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Moving Vista to another computer - is it possible RRS feed

  • Question

  • Welcome,

    I have an untypical issue. I have installed Windows Vista Home Premium OEM. In the activation process my Windows OEM key is associated with my motherboard. But if is possible such action:

    - my motherboard breaks down and needs replacing, so I get a new one;
    - after replacing the motherboard I try to launch Vista - I suppose that I will sea the Blue Screen of Death (am I right?);
    - I try to repair the system with tools included in my installation DVD - there is an item "Repair computer";
    - When the system finally launches I have to reactivate it - I have bought a new copy of Vista OEM with a new key.

    I would rather not install whole OS once more - I have spent too much time installing and configuring many applications. So is it possible to reanimate my OS in such way? Earlier I tried similar method with XP Pro and it worked. Would it be any difference if I will try to repair the system with installation DVD with Service Pack included?

    I am waiting for any response.
    Friday, January 25, 2008 12:56 PM

Answers

  •  

    Hi elipsa,

     

    Thank you for the post.

     

    I would like to explain something on Startup Repair:

     

    Startup Repair can be used to automatically diagnose and fix problems that are preventing Windows from starting. These problems could be registry corruption, missing/corrupted/damaged system or driver files, and hardware failures. The recovery tools used by Startup Repair are the following:

     

    System Restore

    Chkdsk

    BCDMD

    Memory Tester

    XCOPY

     

    Therefore, Startup Repair in Windows Vista is different from System Repair in Windows XP. Startup Repair only fix Windows Vista startup issues and it does not affect Windows updates and other programs.

     

    For the product key issue, I recommend contacting your OEM or our Customer Service for more information:

     

    Microsoft Customer Service: (800) 426-9400, available Monday through Friday, from 6:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. Pacific Time.

     

    Note: Microsoft Customer Service mainly handles issues regarding replacement manuals, disks, drivers and service packs, product IDs, lost CD keys, product orders, policies related to copying software on additional computers, licensing, and product registration.

     

    Hope it helps.

     

    Best regards,

    Tim Quan

    Microsoft Online Community Support

    Monday, January 28, 2008 8:07 AM

All replies

  • An OEM Windows Vista license is permanently bound to the very first computer it is installed and activated on.  If the motherboard requires replacement, you must install the same make and model motherboard.  An OEM Windows Vista license is non-transferrable to a different computer.  Only "retail versions" of Windows Vista can be transferred to a different computer.

     

    Friday, January 25, 2008 3:12 PM
  • But in this situation I WANT TO BUY A NEW OEM AND A NEW LICENSE, so there would be another activation. The only thing is if it is possible without making new installation, just repair the existing one, input a NEW key and activate it. Is it possible technically? I don't want to use the same OEM key on the new motherboard.
    Friday, January 25, 2008 3:25 PM
  • You would need to perform a Startup Repair.  Please see the following: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/tutorial148.html

     

    Friday, January 25, 2008 3:47 PM
  • OK, I think that "startup repair" is what I was thinking about. But how do you think - will this tool repair system files and drivers in order to launch Windows after changing the motherboard? In XP there was similar repair option, but it was something rather like reinstallation (it was repairing system, but I had to also reinstall all service packs and updates; nevertheless all applications were still in system).
    Friday, January 25, 2008 6:24 PM
  •  

    Hi elipsa,

     

    Thank you for the post.

     

    I would like to explain something on Startup Repair:

     

    Startup Repair can be used to automatically diagnose and fix problems that are preventing Windows from starting. These problems could be registry corruption, missing/corrupted/damaged system or driver files, and hardware failures. The recovery tools used by Startup Repair are the following:

     

    System Restore

    Chkdsk

    BCDMD

    Memory Tester

    XCOPY

     

    Therefore, Startup Repair in Windows Vista is different from System Repair in Windows XP. Startup Repair only fix Windows Vista startup issues and it does not affect Windows updates and other programs.

     

    For the product key issue, I recommend contacting your OEM or our Customer Service for more information:

     

    Microsoft Customer Service: (800) 426-9400, available Monday through Friday, from 6:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. Pacific Time.

     

    Note: Microsoft Customer Service mainly handles issues regarding replacement manuals, disks, drivers and service packs, product IDs, lost CD keys, product orders, policies related to copying software on additional computers, licensing, and product registration.

     

    Hope it helps.

     

    Best regards,

    Tim Quan

    Microsoft Online Community Support

    Monday, January 28, 2008 8:07 AM
  •  Carey Frisch wrote:
    An OEM Windows Vista license is permanently bound to the very first computer it is installed and activated on.  If the motherboard requires replacement, you must install the same make and model motherboard.  An OEM Windows Vista license is non-transferrable to a different computer.  Only "retail versions" of Windows Vista can be transferred to a different computer.

     

    an OEM vista license vs a retail license is the only distinction between being able to reinstall vista on a new platform or not.  This should be made a little clearer to the purchasing public as not being able to, or having the ablity to move your os to a newer platform could become frustrating to some consumers ????duh and thanks again for letting me figure this out for myself.......

     

     

    Sunday, November 9, 2008 6:12 AM
  • @ davmhai:
    The licensing terms for Vista (OEM vs. Retail) are the same as they were for XP.
    I'd also like to add that one, generally, doesn't walk in to a store and buy an OEM copy - 'real' stores sell retail copies.
    Yes, OEM is availble from many online stores (every copy of XP, Vista, and WHS that I've bought from NewEgg is OEM); however, the truly 'average' computer user generally doesn't know about such sources.

    (oh, and, nice thread dredge - this one died in January.   )

     

    Wednesday, November 12, 2008 6:06 PM
  • Guys,

     

    I have an iMac that I added Vista OEM to a partition on bootcamp. I was hoping to move Vista to another computer and eliminate the Windows partition from the iMac. I assume based on the above that there is no chance of moving it to a laptop, right??

     

    Bill

    Friday, December 5, 2008 4:03 AM
  •  stratbi wrote:

    Guys,

     

    I have an iMac that I added Vista OEM to a partition on bootcamp. I was hoping to move Vista to another computer and eliminate the Windows partition from the iMac. I assume based on the above that there is no chance of moving it to a laptop, right??

     

    Bill

     

    Right! 

    Saturday, December 6, 2008 12:10 AM
  • I would also like to move my copy of Vista Home Premium to a new computer I built. Would my copy be considered "OEM" or "Retail" if I got it directly from Microsoft at the special $50 add-on price I paid for it with the deal they offered when I bought a Vista Ultimate XP Upgrade license a year ago?
    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 1:28 PM
  • Hi there,
    What does the COA (Certificate of Authenticity) state?

    If it staes as OE then you wont be able to move from one machine to another, if it states as retail or FPP then you can do a one time transfer.

    Akfash Latibu
    http://akfash.wordpress.com
    Akfash Latibu http://akfash.wordpress.com http://techdbt.blogspot.com http://techdisti.blogspot.com
    Monday, January 19, 2009 2:53 PM
  • An OEM Windows Vista license is permanently bound to the very first computer it is installed and activated on.  If the motherboard requires replacement, you must install the same make and model motherboard.  An OEM Windows Vista license is non-transferrable to a different computer.  Only "retail versions" of Windows Vista can be transferred to a different computer.

     


    So the only part that it recognises is the MoBo, in that case if I built a new PC with the exact same model as I first intalled Vista Ultimate OEM would I be able to then install it on the new PC, even if the MoBo was the only pice of hardware that I kept the same.
    Tuesday, June 2, 2009 6:47 AM
  • Vista can't be locked to the mobo. I just replaced the mobo on my daughter's Toshiba, and Vista runs just fine.

    Perhaps because it wasn't a new installation?

     

    Wednesday, November 9, 2011 3:50 AM
  • "FraidyMan" wrote in message news:12511144-3591-4b7c-9154-972884339f0c...

    Vista can't be locked to the mobo. I just replaced the mobo on my daughter's Toshiba, and Vista runs just fine.

    Perhaps because it wasn't a new installation?

     

    Depends on whether the motherboard you purchased was a direct replacement from Toshiba, a direct replacement from elsewhere, and which Key it was using before/after the replacement.
    You may want to post an MGADiag report – it’ll show if you’re likely to have problems or not.
     
    To properly analyse and solve problems with Activation and Validation, we need to see a full copy of the report produced by the MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to your response, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) into your response.
      - **in your own thread**, please
     
    Please also state the Version and Edition of Windows quoted on your COA sticker (if you have one) on the case of your machine, but do NOT quote the Key on the sticker!

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Wednesday, November 9, 2011 9:53 AM