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Supported IP-PBX for MS Lync RRS feed

Answers

  • If you look at the UC OIP site (which you mentioned in your posting) you will see a section "Known Limitation" on each of the IP-PBXs listed there. They have not been formally tested and qualified (and would not qualify with all those limitations). PBX vendors do not want to invest a lot in adopting to Lync since Lync is able to replace PBXs which is not in their interest.

    When planning to connect such a PBX it should be clarified first if any of these limitations poses an important problem. In that case you should use a qualified gateway which does not have any such restriction.


    Johann Deutinger | MCITP Lync 2010 | MCTS Exchange 2010, OCS | ucblog.deutinger.de | http://twitter.com/jwdberlin
    • Proposed as answer by jwdberlin Wednesday, April 6, 2011 9:36 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jose Osorio R. _ Tuesday, April 12, 2011 6:00 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 9:36 AM

All replies

  • They can be connected via SIP. However if you want intoroperability without limitations (as described for those PBXs) you currently still would need a qualified gateway.
    Johann Deutinger | MCITP Lync 2010 | MCTS Exchange 2010 | ucblog.deutinger.de
    • Proposed as answer by jwdberlin Monday, April 4, 2011 8:09 PM
    Monday, April 4, 2011 8:09 PM
  • Yes it means direct SIP to a IP-PBX is supported, no gateway is required.

    Cheers

    Chris


    http://voipnorm.blogspot.com/
    Monday, April 4, 2011 8:10 PM
  • Hi jwdberlin,

    What do you means when you said  if you want intoroperability without limitations? what will be the limitations?.

    Regards


    Regards. José Osorio.
    Monday, April 4, 2011 9:45 PM
  • If you look at the UC OIP site (which you mentioned in your posting) you will see a section "Known Limitation" on each of the IP-PBXs listed there. They have not been formally tested and qualified (and would not qualify with all those limitations). PBX vendors do not want to invest a lot in adopting to Lync since Lync is able to replace PBXs which is not in their interest.

    When planning to connect such a PBX it should be clarified first if any of these limitations poses an important problem. In that case you should use a qualified gateway which does not have any such restriction.


    Johann Deutinger | MCITP Lync 2010 | MCTS Exchange 2010, OCS | ucblog.deutinger.de | http://twitter.com/jwdberlin
    • Proposed as answer by jwdberlin Wednesday, April 6, 2011 9:36 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jose Osorio R. _ Tuesday, April 12, 2011 6:00 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 9:36 AM
  • jwdberlin is right.  While the supported PBX's will work as a gateway there are going to be limitations to every one. There may also be some unknown limitations that you will not find out about till later due to these PBX not going through the interoperability certification. Since these PBX's are listed as supported, Commercial Technical Support will attempt to help you fiqure out any problem that arises, but it may be up to the PBX vendor to make changes to their product to make a limitation, known or unknown, be resolved.  
    Richard McGiboney, Support Escalation Engineer, Microsoft
    Friday, April 8, 2011 11:03 PM
  • I think even if a certified gateway is used, there may be a potential issue. Indeed, there are 2 possibilites to perform the Lync/Gateway/PBX integaration:

    1. SIP between the gateway and the IP-PBX.

    2. E1/T1 (ISDN/QSIG) between the gateway and the PBX.

    From what I can see, the SIP connectivity between the gateway and the IP-PBX could also introduce "compatibility" issues similarly to have a Direct Sip between Lync and the PBX. Unless the gateway and the PBX are certifed together for SIP Connectivity.

    The E1/T1 connectivity between the gateway and the IP-PBX has less problems for such interoperability but has other issues (why not using SIP and why to purchade extra hardware - E1/T1... ).

    Quang.

    Saturday, April 9, 2011 6:46 AM
  • This is correct also.  Even if the gateway is certified for use with Lync, there are issues that arise for some scenarios.  Sometimes it will take just an update in the firmware on the gateway, sometimes it will take a call into the gateway vendor. But adding themselves to the supported list, the vendors have also dedicated themselves to making fix if a problem is found on their side of the communication path. Most PBX vendors will do this as well, but it is not required of them.
    Richard McGiboney, Support Escalation Engineer, Microsoft
    Monday, April 11, 2011 11:12 PM