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Group Policy Management in Mixed Environment Windows 7/8

    Question

  • I have inherited a Group Policy environment that was originally built for Windows 7. A couple years ago they started deploying Windows 8 but used most of the Windows 7 objects that already existed. As you can imagine the Windows 8 workstations have many issues caused by UAC, desktop backgrounds etc. This lead to poor user acceptance with Windows 8.

    Sooner rather than later we will be rolling out Windows 10 and I want to make sure Group Policy is prepared correctly. Is their any information regarding best practices for Group Policy in a mixed environment? So far from the videos and documentation I have read for W10 they recommend you have separate objects/admx templates for each OS but not how to implement and restructure your current environment.

    Wednesday, September 16, 2015 8:00 PM

Answers

All replies

  • How is your Group Policy managed currently? Are you using Central Store for the ADMX templates?
     
    If you are using Central Store in your environment, then you can just copy the latest Windows 10 ADMX template into it to overwrite older files (You can use either "xcopy /d" or "robocopy").
     
    Windows 7, Windows 8 is the supported operating system of Administrative templates released for Windows 10. Using some filtering rules for the operation system, no need to manage a separate set of ADMX files. Your existing settings won't be lost.
     

    Regards,

    Ethan Hua


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    Thursday, September 17, 2015 5:50 AM
    Moderator
  • It's also worth grabbing the spreadsheet that includes details of the Group Policy settings here, along with a bunch of downlevel OS Group Policy settings spreadsheets as well.

    In case some settings is updated in Windows 10 ADMX templates, and then you can reconfigured them accordingly..

    Thursday, September 17, 2015 6:14 AM
  • We use a central store, when the time comes I can copy the W10 files.

    My main concern is issues with Windows 7 settings currently causing issues with Windows 8 workstations. As an example they disabled the UAC originally to resolve some issues on Windows 7. In Windows 8 if you have UAC disabled certain items will not work like the Windows Store or Windows Store applications. I know the current architecture will cause issues with Windows 10.

    What I am asking is the best way to configure Group Policy for multiple operating systems? I have read about WMI filtered GPO's but I wanted to see if their was any other options as this would make me have to double the amount of objects, one for each OS. 

    Thanks

    Thursday, September 17, 2015 3:22 PM
  • > operating systems? I have read about WMI filtered GPO's but I wanted to
    > see if their was any other options as this would make me have to double
    > the amount of objects, one for each OS.
     
    We add our computers to security groups based on OS versions, so we use
    security filtering. If your deployment supports that, I'd suggest to go
    the same way. If it does not, I'd recommend WMI filters. Easy to use,
    easy to implement, and since we only query buildnumbers they are quite
    fast :)
     
    Remember that the buildnumber is a string, not a number:
     
     
    And if you are really concerned about WMI filter performance:
     
     

    Greetings/Grüße, Martin

    Mal ein gutes Buch über GPOs lesen?
    Good or bad GPOs? - my blog…
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment (-:
    Thursday, September 17, 2015 3:45 PM
  • My main concern is issues with Windows 7 settings currently causing issues with Windows 8 workstations. As an example they disabled the UAC originally to resolve some issues on Windows 7. In Windows 8 if you have UAC disabled certain items will not work like the Windows Store or Windows Store applications. I know the current architecture will cause issues with Windows 10.

    Thanks for the clarification. For this kind of concern, I would agree with Martin that WMI filters would be the way to go.

    Regards,

    Ethan Hua


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com

    Friday, September 18, 2015 2:53 AM
    Moderator