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Can I Run an Exchange Server Using a Free No-IP Hostname?

    Question

  • Hi there,

    I have installed  exchange server 2013 on my virtual test lab and my ISP is taking too long in assigning a static IP address for me domain my domain 

    I have been looking at the www.no-ip.com website and it looks feasible to create mx records etc to push through email to a no-ip account.


     How do I setup Exchange to receive emails to the domain this way and also any others I need to consider/configure to get this working.

    Any help in this matter would be gratefully received.

    regards

    Laxit

    Wednesday, September 7, 2016 8:57 AM

Answers

  • You may have to pay for the service for optimal results. I have been doing this for years - so yes, it is definitely possible.

    I'm not sure where you are located so I cannot give exact pricing but I think the cost is insignificant.

    Essentially, once you sign up, you'll install a tool on one internal server that will reach out and update your A record based on whatever IP address has been assigned to the external interface of your firewall.

    One pre-requisite: if you have a registered domain name for your test organization, i.e. "mytestnetwork.com", you have to indicate that you want No-IP to manage your DNS records (and not the domain name provider). For example, if you get a domain name with GoDaddy, you would indicate in the GoDaddy interface that No-IP is managing your DNS records. It's been a while since I did this, but I think you designate the No-IP DNS servers.

    In the No-IP interface, you create MX records that point to your A record (which is regularly updated by the tool I mentioned above).

    Another tip that may be useful: if you attempt to send test messages to external recipients (Gmail or Hotamil recipients for example), they will probably be rejected, as most dynamic IP ranges are included in many of the big blacklists (SpamHaus for example). No-IP also allows you to relay email through their servers. Please note that there is an additional fee for this.

    But in the end, No-IP can indeed allow the creation of a fully-functional Exchange lab (with inbound and outbound connectivity to/from the outside world).


    Please mark as helpful if you find my contribution useful or as an answer if it does answer your question. That will encourage me - and others - to take time out to help you.

    Wednesday, September 7, 2016 4:59 PM
  • Another thing to watch out for with your ISP is filtering on port 25. Many ISPs do not allow dynamic IPs on their own network to either receive from or send to port 25 over the network.

    This is done to prevent botnets from sending email over their networks.


    Byron Wright (http://byronwright.blogspot.ca)

    Wednesday, September 7, 2016 7:25 PM

All replies

  • Paul Cunningham has an article about that:

    http://exchangeserverpro.com/exchange-server-dynamic-public-ip-address/


    My Blog: http://exchangeitup.blogspot.com My Twitter: http://twitter.com/ExchangeITup

    Wednesday, September 7, 2016 12:41 PM
  • You may have to pay for the service for optimal results. I have been doing this for years - so yes, it is definitely possible.

    I'm not sure where you are located so I cannot give exact pricing but I think the cost is insignificant.

    Essentially, once you sign up, you'll install a tool on one internal server that will reach out and update your A record based on whatever IP address has been assigned to the external interface of your firewall.

    One pre-requisite: if you have a registered domain name for your test organization, i.e. "mytestnetwork.com", you have to indicate that you want No-IP to manage your DNS records (and not the domain name provider). For example, if you get a domain name with GoDaddy, you would indicate in the GoDaddy interface that No-IP is managing your DNS records. It's been a while since I did this, but I think you designate the No-IP DNS servers.

    In the No-IP interface, you create MX records that point to your A record (which is regularly updated by the tool I mentioned above).

    Another tip that may be useful: if you attempt to send test messages to external recipients (Gmail or Hotamil recipients for example), they will probably be rejected, as most dynamic IP ranges are included in many of the big blacklists (SpamHaus for example). No-IP also allows you to relay email through their servers. Please note that there is an additional fee for this.

    But in the end, No-IP can indeed allow the creation of a fully-functional Exchange lab (with inbound and outbound connectivity to/from the outside world).


    Please mark as helpful if you find my contribution useful or as an answer if it does answer your question. That will encourage me - and others - to take time out to help you.

    Wednesday, September 7, 2016 4:59 PM
  • Another thing to watch out for with your ISP is filtering on port 25. Many ISPs do not allow dynamic IPs on their own network to either receive from or send to port 25 over the network.

    This is done to prevent botnets from sending email over their networks.


    Byron Wright (http://byronwright.blogspot.ca)

    Wednesday, September 7, 2016 7:25 PM