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windows experience index in windows 10

    Question

  • Hi.Don't see windows experience test on system page. It would be good to compare score from previous win 7install on the old athlon64 laptop I installed 10 on. It seems to have improved and sped up quite a bit so far.
    Monday, November 03, 2014 11:36 PM

Answers

  • The Windows Experience is still there--even in build 9860.  However, the GUI was retired with Windows 8.  If you want to run the experience, which is really called the "Windows System Assessment Tool," you must run it from the command line.

    Open an administrative command prompt and type winsat formal -v -xml c:\winstatresults.xml.  This will run the full formal test in verbose mode and provide an xml output of the results.  It is in the report, you will see the scores you seek.  As others have said, it is important to keep in mind that the numbers may not--probably won't--really align with the numbers from previous operating systems.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that all of the preview versions and builds are "checked" builds with debugging code built in.  As such, preview versions of Windows will never run as fast as "free" builds that are fully optimized and lacks all of the debugging code.  This is the reason why Microsoft insists that people don't run and publish performance testing results as the test is not an accurate or fair measure.

    If you want to run just a subset of the tests, type winsat /? see all of the arguments and options.


    Navigate to C:\Windows\Performance\WinSAT\DataStore to see all of the assessment XML files.
    • Edited by DarienHawk67 Tuesday, November 04, 2014 8:33 PM Added WINSAT DataStore path.
    • Proposed as answer by Cloud_TSModerator Monday, November 10, 2014 9:36 AM
    • Marked as answer by Cloud_TSModerator Tuesday, November 11, 2014 8:21 AM
    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 8:27 PM

All replies

  • Bilibob9

    WEI was eliminated in win 8 never to be resurrected as it did not reflect real world performance changes.  It was a meaningless number


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Monday, November 03, 2014 11:54 PM
    Moderator
  • Many (most?) people accumulate background programs over time and find new versions of Windows to seem more responsive than older installations simply because they are not running nearly as much junkware.

    Careful benchmarking using 3rd party software has shown a steady slowdown, believe it or not, in all Windows releases since Windows 7.  Windows 10 is really no different (i.e., it's slower), though in all fairness it might be a bit more instrumented than a retail build for detecting errors.

    The feeling of responsiveness is also influenced somewhat by the desktop transition animations, which give you visual cues of "speed" but are in fact are almost unrelated to actual efficiency or performance.  The current set of animations in build 9860 seem kind of "abrupt" to me, which may be leading you to sense better responsiveness.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 12:05 AM
  • Thank you for your reply.In all fairness, I was comparing to a brand new install of win 7 so bloating is not an issue. As for the windows 10 being slower [never tried win 8]what do you base this on? Accepted knowledge or firsthand.Video played better, web loaded faster, but i havn't had much time to check it out. As for animations, well I've always been more of a windows explorer type user. As for benchmarks, well they can also be misleading [ie video card benchmarks]So.....in my opinion will be better than win7.
    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 2:22 AM
  • If you compare the same computer with two versions .......maybe not meaningless.
    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 2:32 AM
  • B

    The number is  useless. For example you can run the same machine with no changes and get a significantly different result.  The number comes from a static data base where the system is rated against others so you conceivably could go down over time even with no changes being made.


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 3:17 AM
    Moderator
  • Firsthand controlled testing of Windows 8 and 8.1 as compared to 7 on high-end workstation hardware tested for real-world throughput in an Engineering development setting.  Mostly it's file system access that's been slowing down, and most of that slowdown was seen between 8 and 8.1.  There are a few things that are a little faster, but most kinds of operation are up to 10% slower in 8.1.

    I've only done minimal testing with Win 10 so far, and the very first build actually did seem a bit faster than Win 8.1, but build 9860 now seems slower than 8.1 (again, concentrating on file system access, using SSD hardware).  Just as a couple of quick examples, on nearly identically provisioned virtual machines (yes, I realize these are not on real hardware; I don't have Win 10 on real hardware yet, but I HAVE verified that such testing mirrors comparative tests on the same real hardware):

    Win 8.1 x64:

    Win 10 x64:

    I have to disclaim this - mileage will most certainly vary from system to system and because this is not a retail build (it has extra tweaks for telemetry, etc.).

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options



    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 4:48 AM
  • Hi.Don't see windows experience test on system page. It would be good to compare score from previous win 7install on the old athlon64 laptop I installed 10 on. It seems to have improved and sped up quite a bit so far.

    This seems to work providing you have no hardware issues, but it’s a long-winded process. Open a Run window (Windows Logo key+R), type perfmon and press Enter. Click Data Collector Sets > System > Right-click System Diagnostics > Start. When it has finished, go down to Reports in the left pane > System > System Diagnostics and click on the name of your computer and the data will be collected. Scroll down in the main pane and expand the Hardware Configuration drop down > Expand Desktop Rating drop down > Expand the + sign below Query, finally expand the + sign below Returned Objects to display your WEI score.


    Ninety-nine per cent of politicians give the rest a bad name.

    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 8:36 AM
  • Thanks for that little gem, BurrWalnut.  I didn't realize the scores could still be summarized like that. 

    Of course, as mentioned above, they're not really of use for comparison between different operating systems - Microsoft changed the scales at the time of Windows 8.  My Win 8.1 numbers all are higher than when running Windows 7 on the same hardware, yet actual work operations aren't faster (just the opposite).

    By the way, you can actually get a raw set of WinSAT measurement data directly from the WinSAT tool on the command line.  At an elevated command prompt:

    WinSAT  formal

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 1:32 PM
  • Thanks for that little gem, BurrWalnut.  I didn't realize the scores could still be summarized like that. 

    Of course, as mentioned above, they're not really of use for comparison between different operating systems - Microsoft changed the scales at the time of Windows 8.  My Win 8.1 numbers all are higher than when running Windows 7 on the same hardware, yet actual work operations aren't faster (just the opposite).

    By the way, you can actually get a raw set of WinSAT measurement data directly from the WinSAT tool on the command line.  At an elevated command prompt:

    WinSAT  formal

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    It is useful, it runs on Vista and later.



    Ninety-nine per cent of politicians give the rest a bad name.

    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 2:05 PM
  • The Windows Experience is still there--even in build 9860.  However, the GUI was retired with Windows 8.  If you want to run the experience, which is really called the "Windows System Assessment Tool," you must run it from the command line.

    Open an administrative command prompt and type winsat formal -v -xml c:\winstatresults.xml.  This will run the full formal test in verbose mode and provide an xml output of the results.  It is in the report, you will see the scores you seek.  As others have said, it is important to keep in mind that the numbers may not--probably won't--really align with the numbers from previous operating systems.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that all of the preview versions and builds are "checked" builds with debugging code built in.  As such, preview versions of Windows will never run as fast as "free" builds that are fully optimized and lacks all of the debugging code.  This is the reason why Microsoft insists that people don't run and publish performance testing results as the test is not an accurate or fair measure.

    If you want to run just a subset of the tests, type winsat /? see all of the arguments and options.


    Navigate to C:\Windows\Performance\WinSAT\DataStore to see all of the assessment XML files.
    • Edited by DarienHawk67 Tuesday, November 04, 2014 8:33 PM Added WINSAT DataStore path.
    • Proposed as answer by Cloud_TSModerator Monday, November 10, 2014 9:36 AM
    • Marked as answer by Cloud_TSModerator Tuesday, November 11, 2014 8:21 AM
    Tuesday, November 04, 2014 8:27 PM
  • By the way, there is now a nice little freeware tool for displaying the internally calculated WEI scores on systems where the UI has been removed...

    http://winaero.com/comment.php?comment.news.220

    Example on Win 10:

    On Win 8.1:

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Thursday, June 18, 2015 3:30 PM