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Exchange Server and Remote Access to Public Calendar RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello:

    We use Outlook 2010 with Exchange Server at the 45 person architecture firm I work at.  We have a public calendar (set up in public folders) that is used by staff to note their time away from the office (doctor’s appt, vacation, client meeting, etc). The owner of the company wants to be able to remotely access that public calendar to be able to know when staff are out of the office.  Can it be set up on his Surface 2 or phone (iPhone) so that when he’s not in the office, he can see that public calendar?

    I’ve search online and from what I can tell, the only way to make it work is with third party software.  Is that true?  Or is there another way to make it work?  Is VPN an option?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.

    Joe

    Monday, October 13, 2014 3:43 PM

All replies

  • You may want to look into the Outlook Web App for iPad and also iPhone. You can download it from iTunes. For Surface I would just install Office.

    OWA for iPad
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/owa-for-ipad/id659524331?mt=8

    OWA for iPhone
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/owa-for-iphone/id659503543?mt=8

    I think this would be the best fit for you.


    Check out my latest blog posts on www.supertekboy.com A tech blog for I.T. Superheroes.



    Monday, October 13, 2014 3:57 PM
  • You can try creating a shared mailbox instead of a Public folder. Then your employees can send there time off to the mailbox calendar where you can grant the owner full access permission to the shared mailbox. Then the owner will be able to see the calendar via Outlook on his surface and OWA. 

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj150498(v=exchg.150).aspx


    DJ Grijalva | MCITP: EMA 2007/2010 SPA 2010 | www.persistentcerebro.com

    Monday, October 13, 2014 8:52 PM
  • Thanks Gareth.

    He has MS Office on his Surface and can access his own calendar, it's the public calendar that he needs access to when he's not in the office. Everything I read says the Public Calendar can't be shared and I should set up a shared mailbox, have all staff post their vacation time, doctor visits, etc to that calendar and give the owner the ability to view it remotely.  I assume that means I'd set up the share mailbox with whatever address was chosen (example - calendar@company.com)  and then set it up as another mailbox on his Surface.

    Joe

    Monday, October 13, 2014 9:23 PM
  • Exactly how you would do it. You can make sure that only the owner has full access to the account and when assigning the 'full access' permissions automapping will automatically add the shared mailbox to the owners mailbox. So you will not need to do anything further. 

    DJ Grijalva | MCITP: EMA 2007/2010 SPA 2010 | www.persistentcerebro.com

    Monday, October 13, 2014 9:27 PM
  • The Public Folders could be accessed and shared with a Surface running 8.1 with Office. Can you link the article that said otherwise?

    Check out my latest blog posts on www.supertekboy.com A tech blog for I.T. Superheroes.

    Monday, October 13, 2014 11:07 PM
  • Thanks DJ, After I get a chance to try it, I'll post the results.

    Joe

    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 12:52 AM
  • I was at work while doing research on how to make it work and don't remember the sites I was at.  Truthfully, I searched so many places I'm not sure of the exact wording but it was said that you can't give access to a public folder to a user not on the network (or something similar).  They pointed to a handful of sites that provide software that can make the connection, for fees ranging from $20 to $600. 

    I don't think I misread any of them but it's not out of the realm of possibility. 

    To summarize your reply, you're saying that, with the Outlook/Exchange 2010 public folder / public calendar active and populated, the user (owner in this case) can access that public folder/calendar from any location, including offsite (while using a client's wifi, for example) on his Surface tablet.  He doesn't need to set anything else up, his install of Outlook 2010 with Exchange 2010 will work.  If so, how do I make it work?  In the office, the public folder can be seen and accessed because he's on the company network.  Offsite (and according to him), the public folder/calendar can't be accessed.

    Joe

    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 1:12 AM
  • If so, how do I make it work?  In the office, the public folder can be seen and accessed because he's on the company network.  Offsite (and according to him), the public folder/calendar can't be accessed.

    Joe

    As long as Outlook Anywhere is permitted to work externally he can access Public Folders as if he were in the office. So, if he can access his mailbox externally without a VPN, then he should be able to access Public Folders as well.

    Check out my latest blog posts on www.supertekboy.com A tech blog for I.T. Superheroes.

    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 1:31 AM
  • Ok, so Outlook Anywhere is the key to it. 

    I'm an architect with IT aspirations so I'll have to do a little research to understand Outlook Anywhere a little more, how to turn it on, etc.

    Thanks for the info.

    Joe

    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 1:43 AM
  • Yes with Exchange 2013 it should be on by default. Could be some stuff needed at the firewall. Or perhaps some External URL configuration.

    About a quarter of the way down the page on this article it refers to setting the Outlook Anywhere URLs.

    http://supertekboy.com/2014/07/08/designing-simple-namespace-exchange-2013/

    To test Outlook Anywhere you can use the www.exrca.com test website from Microsoft. You can run the Connectivity Test. See if it comes back with any errors.


    Check out my latest blog posts on www.supertekboy.com A tech blog for I.T. Superheroes.

    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 1:55 AM
  • Thanks, I'll try and let you know the results. 
    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 1:57 AM
  • I'm going to attempt to activate Anywhere soon, probably early next week. I found a site that does a step-by-step of the Anywhere setup and I have a couple of questions based on those steps (here's the site - http://exchangeserverpro.com/how-to-configure-exchange-server-2010-outlook-anywhere/) After the Anywhere wizard opens, it says this - "The external host name you choose should ideally be one that is already included in the Exchange certificate configured on the Client Access server. Otherwise you will need to create a new certificate for Exchange." So I can name the external host, where do I find the Exchange cert? When accessing the firewall to allow Anywhere through, it says this: To enable remote Outlook users to connect to Outlook Anywhere the perimeter firewall for the network must be configured to allow the SSL/HTTPS connections to pass through to the Client Access server. The precise steps for this will depend on which firewall you are using in your environment. However the basic components of this configuration are: •A public DNS record for the external host name you are using for Outlook Anywhere •A public IP address on the firewall that the public DNS record resolves to •A NAT or publishing rule to allow SSL/HTTPS connections to reach the Client Access server
    Thursday, October 16, 2014 1:24 PM
  • Correct. The name you use for Outlook Anywhere should be on the SSL certificate you use for Exchange. Probably the easiest way is to just give Outlook Anywhere the same URL you use for Outlook Web Access (assuming you have a cert for that name already).

    For Exchange Server 2013, log into the Exchange Admin Center. From their the certificate are under the Server tab on the left >> Certificates tab along the top.

    This article also gives you a complete guide on how to configure your Exchange 2013 name space.

    http://supertekboy.com/2014/07/08/designing-simple-namespace-exchange-2013/

    I wouldn't worry about the firewall. If Outlook Web App is working then you have all the necessary firewall configuration already in place.


    Check out my latest blog posts on www.supertekboy.com A tech blog for I.T. Superheroes.


    Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:22 AM
  • Thanks for the info, I'm hopefully going to try it this week.  In regards to the namespace; I understand (slightly) the importance of it but, if our firm already has OWA set up, does that mean namespace is already taken care of?  We use an outside consultant for the majority of our IT needs so I suspect they've already done it, but I'm going down the path to become more involved with the daily IT issues, so I'd like to get my hands dirty and see, and know, how things work.
    Tuesday, October 21, 2014 12:50 PM