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What is the difference between Azure Windows Virtual Desktop and Windows Server with Remote Desktop License? RRS feed

  • Question

  • What is the difference between Azure Windows Virtual Desktop and Windows Server with Remote Desktop License?
    Tuesday, April 21, 2020 4:27 AM

Answers

  • "Azure Remote Desktop" does not correspond to an existing service available in Azure. I'm not sure if we understood each other. Let me try to reformulate.

    Remote Desktop Services (RDS) is a feature that is integrated in any version of Windows Server (in the Windows Server 2003 it was called : Terminal Services). By default, Remote Desktop Services can propose several type of features : creation of dedicated virtual desktops [VDI] (that"s mean 1 VM = 1 user), shared desktops or Remote Apps. You can deploy RDS in your personal datacenter to provide such desktop environment to your people. In this scenario, you will deploy everything and you will to buy CAL RDS licences for your infrastructure.

    => You need licences.

    Azure Virtual Desktop is the "SaaS" version of a RDS deployment. That's mean, you will not have to deploy all the servers. You will choose how many people are in your organization or how many need a virtual desktop and all the infrastructure will be deployed automatically in Azure. In this price, yes, you will also have the RDS licences (and all the rest) that will be integrated in the cost (because it's "as a service").

    => You will pay "as you use" and you don't need to pay licences separately.

    Finally, your asked when should we use ? Simple, it's the same difference between deploying an On-prem/internal Exchange infrastructure or using Office 365 Exchange Online. In the first scenario, you are responsible for the management of your Exchange infrastructure (servers, backup, monitoring, etc.). In the second case, Microsoft is managing in for you - you're just creating your users throw an interface.

    It will be the same between local RDS vs. Azure Virtual Desktop : do you want to manage technically the infrastructure (configuration, backup, monitoring, etc.) or do you want to have something "as a service" where you will not manage the servers but just creating the accounts that need to access to the virtual desktops.


    -- Thibault

    • Marked as answer by SAMATA Friday, April 24, 2020 5:41 AM
    Wednesday, April 22, 2020 1:25 PM
  • When you will setup Azure Virtual Desktop, it will be possible for your to create the virtual machines you want in terms of RAM, CPU resources that will be needed. Depending on this choice, obviously yes the cost will be different. You can estimate your costs by using the Azure pricing tool available here : https://azure.microsoft.com/fr-fr/pricing/details/virtual-machines/windows/.

    -- Thibault

    • Marked as answer by SAMATA Friday, April 24, 2020 5:41 AM
    Thursday, April 23, 2020 10:11 AM
  • A virtual machine is essentially a PC hosted on remote storage. However, a hosted virtual desktop is a standard, shared user experience which does not vary and runs only those applications which are presented to the user through a limited desktop interface, usually through policy.
    • Marked as answer by SAMATA Friday, April 24, 2020 5:41 AM
    Thursday, April 23, 2020 10:42 AM
  • Windows Virtual Desktop on azure is a comprehensive desktop and app virtualization service running in the cloud. It is the only virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) that delivers simplified management, multi-session Windows 10, optimisations for Office 365 ProPlus and support for Remote Desktop Services (RDS) environments. Deploy and scale your Windows desktops and apps on Azure in minutes and get built-in security and compliance features.

    Learn more about Azure WVD Pricing : https://azure.microsoft.com/en-in/pricing/details/virtual-desktop/

    • Marked as answer by SAMATA Friday, April 24, 2020 5:41 AM
    Thursday, April 23, 2020 10:47 AM

All replies

  • Hello,

    Azure Windows Virtual Desktop is the "as a service" solution that is based on Remote Desktop Services (RDS). That's mean when you're using Azure Windows Virtual Desktop, you will have the whole RDS infrastructure to propose virtual desktops to your people. For a certain amount / user / month, you will have all the servers requirement needed to do so but the cost will integrate the CAL RDS licence that should be needed. So in this scenario, it's not needed to buy CAL RDS licences because they will be managed "as a service" by Microsoft.

    However, if you want to deploy virtual Desktops or Remote Apps throw a RDS platform that you would have installed by yourself - you will require CAL RDS licences to be deployed in your infrastructure.

    Do you see the small distinction ?

    Kind regards,


    -- Thibault

    • Proposed as answer by ThibaultG Wednesday, April 22, 2020 2:23 PM
    Tuesday, April 21, 2020 12:21 PM
  • If I understand: Azure remote desktop: If comes with a license (inclued in the subscription) Windows Terminal Server: Need to by CAL RDS per user Am I right? When should we use "Azure remote desktop" instead of "Windows Terminal Server"?
    Tuesday, April 21, 2020 5:19 PM
  • "Azure Remote Desktop" does not correspond to an existing service available in Azure. I'm not sure if we understood each other. Let me try to reformulate.

    Remote Desktop Services (RDS) is a feature that is integrated in any version of Windows Server (in the Windows Server 2003 it was called : Terminal Services). By default, Remote Desktop Services can propose several type of features : creation of dedicated virtual desktops [VDI] (that"s mean 1 VM = 1 user), shared desktops or Remote Apps. You can deploy RDS in your personal datacenter to provide such desktop environment to your people. In this scenario, you will deploy everything and you will to buy CAL RDS licences for your infrastructure.

    => You need licences.

    Azure Virtual Desktop is the "SaaS" version of a RDS deployment. That's mean, you will not have to deploy all the servers. You will choose how many people are in your organization or how many need a virtual desktop and all the infrastructure will be deployed automatically in Azure. In this price, yes, you will also have the RDS licences (and all the rest) that will be integrated in the cost (because it's "as a service").

    => You will pay "as you use" and you don't need to pay licences separately.

    Finally, your asked when should we use ? Simple, it's the same difference between deploying an On-prem/internal Exchange infrastructure or using Office 365 Exchange Online. In the first scenario, you are responsible for the management of your Exchange infrastructure (servers, backup, monitoring, etc.). In the second case, Microsoft is managing in for you - you're just creating your users throw an interface.

    It will be the same between local RDS vs. Azure Virtual Desktop : do you want to manage technically the infrastructure (configuration, backup, monitoring, etc.) or do you want to have something "as a service" where you will not manage the servers but just creating the accounts that need to access to the virtual desktops.


    -- Thibault

    • Marked as answer by SAMATA Friday, April 24, 2020 5:41 AM
    Wednesday, April 22, 2020 1:25 PM
  • Thanks for the clarification. Is Azure Virtual Desktop has difference price for the hardware setting like memory, cpu, etc.?
    Thursday, April 23, 2020 3:37 AM
  • When you will setup Azure Virtual Desktop, it will be possible for your to create the virtual machines you want in terms of RAM, CPU resources that will be needed. Depending on this choice, obviously yes the cost will be different. You can estimate your costs by using the Azure pricing tool available here : https://azure.microsoft.com/fr-fr/pricing/details/virtual-machines/windows/.

    -- Thibault

    • Marked as answer by SAMATA Friday, April 24, 2020 5:41 AM
    Thursday, April 23, 2020 10:11 AM
  • A virtual machine is essentially a PC hosted on remote storage. However, a hosted virtual desktop is a standard, shared user experience which does not vary and runs only those applications which are presented to the user through a limited desktop interface, usually through policy.
    • Marked as answer by SAMATA Friday, April 24, 2020 5:41 AM
    Thursday, April 23, 2020 10:42 AM
  • Thanks to all for your answers!
    Friday, April 24, 2020 5:42 AM