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Import data from Power BI Designer into Excel RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi everyone, 

    Let me put you in place.

    I have been using Power BI Designer to connect into Google Analytics. Once I got the data, I can use it in the Designer to create my plots and metrics. But I would like to use that data in Excel, in order to use the Power View and Power Pivot. 

    Do you know if there is the way to do that? Because, I don't have the option as a data source in Excel. 

    Another approach, also equally valid: 

    I tried the same but using app.powerbi.com, I mean, connect to Google Analytics, and get the data. Same: Is there any way to use that data in Excel (Office 365)

    Thank you in advance for your help. 

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015 8:05 AM

Answers

  • No, the Power Query codebase itself has not been forked and is not expected to fork for at least the lifespan of Office 16. But with the integration of Power Query functionality into Office, we're going to try to keep the Power Query addin in sync with Office 16 while the PBI Designer may ship more frequently. The Office team may also elect to expose or not expose certain data sources inside Excel based on their own considerations. For instance, they chose not to incorporate Google Analytics.
    Wednesday, June 10, 2015 9:26 PM

All replies

  • It was my impression that Power BI Designer gave you all the Power Query, Power Pivot, and Power View functionality. Is there Power Query, Power Pivot, or Power View functionality that you have in Excel that you can't find in Power BI Designer?
    Wednesday, June 10, 2015 2:29 PM
  • Hi Tim , 

    Thank you for your reply. Yes, you are right Designer give all the functionality. But I need that data in Excel. The app.powerbi.com and designer approaches, are just part of my research toward the solution. With both of them I have the way (pluging) to connect to Google Analytics, but with Excel I don't. 

    That's because I am asking a way to import that data from Designer into Excel; but it would be equally valid to access directly the data source from Excel (actually it would be much better, indeed).

    I hope you get a more clear understanding of the situation now. 

    Thank you for your collaboration. 

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015 3:12 PM
  • Ah, I see. So, I don't know the answer to your question, but it does bring up a big concern.

    As soon as Power BI Designer became its own app, the concern was that Excel would lag behind in "Power" functionality. If Power Query in Power BI Designer leveraged the same code base as Power Query in Excel, then we would have seen Google Analytics included in the recent release of Power Query for Excel. The fact that it's not there seems to indicate that the Power Query project has indeed forked and Power Query for Excel is not just an older version of Power Query for Power BI Designer, but a different product entirely. This is the main problem with the current Microsoft BI strategy. There are too many moving parts. Keeping Power BI Designer and Excel on the same Power Query code base would be a big step towards simplifying things and making the Microsoft BI stack more appealing.

    FYI, it's the same problem with Power Pivot, Power View, and the Excel Online web app. With Excel Online specifically, I'm still not clear how many different versions are lurking out there and what the exact differences are between them.

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015 3:38 PM
  • No, the Power Query codebase itself has not been forked and is not expected to fork for at least the lifespan of Office 16. But with the integration of Power Query functionality into Office, we're going to try to keep the Power Query addin in sync with Office 16 while the PBI Designer may ship more frequently. The Office team may also elect to expose or not expose certain data sources inside Excel based on their own considerations. For instance, they chose not to incorporate Google Analytics.
    Wednesday, June 10, 2015 9:26 PM
  • There is a workaround that may be helpful in your particular case: the latest version of DAX Studio lets you perform queries on a running Power BI designer model. First, open your model in power BI designer. Then from Excel, launch DAX studio. You will then see an option to connect to your model. From there you can create queries to extract data from Designer into Excel. The problem is that each time you launch designer, it listens on a different port number. The consequence is that you cannot simply refresh the table in Excel after you have updated your model in designer. In order to do that, you will need to update the connections created in Excel and modify the port number with the new one, visible at the bottom of the DAX studio window. It is far from a "seamless integration", but at least your data is not locked into designer.



    Monday, June 15, 2015 1:10 PM