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Stopping all services when unknown bad update arrives RRS feed

  • Question

  • We have a WSUS server here at work that is configured to push out updates on Saturday night. However my computer is configured to push the patches out on Wednesday(right after patch Tuesday) for testing purposes. Suppose my computer starts acting funny and I am not quite able to pinpoint which update it was that screwed my computer up.

    How would  I go about stopping the updates from occurring on Saturday night?

    Yeah I could go change the location of our server to some gibberish but I'm wanting a more thorough way of doing this...

    We have WSUS 6.0 on a 2012 R2

    Wednesday, January 20, 2016 3:43 PM

Answers

  • You want to configure multiple WSUS groups.

    Normal practive is to have a WSUS test group which you place any machines you want to use to test updates. When you approve updates you only approve them for the test group first.

    If you are then happy that no updates present a problem then you can approve the updates for the other groups. If you think an update caused a problem then no action is needed as they are not approved in the other groups so they will not be rolled out.

    This is the easiest method of managing this issue, alternate method would be to remove the approvals you have just approved and found a problem with but this can be messy. The easiest solution to manage is the method I have mentioned by using multiple groups.

    In the company I work for, we wait a week after updates are released to hear of any potential issues. A week after the updates are released by Microsoft we approve updates for the test group, if a week later none of the computers in the test group report any issues we then roll it out to the rest of the computers in the company.

    Wednesday, January 20, 2016 4:04 PM

All replies

  • You want to configure multiple WSUS groups.

    Normal practive is to have a WSUS test group which you place any machines you want to use to test updates. When you approve updates you only approve them for the test group first.

    If you are then happy that no updates present a problem then you can approve the updates for the other groups. If you think an update caused a problem then no action is needed as they are not approved in the other groups so they will not be rolled out.

    This is the easiest method of managing this issue, alternate method would be to remove the approvals you have just approved and found a problem with but this can be messy. The easiest solution to manage is the method I have mentioned by using multiple groups.

    In the company I work for, we wait a week after updates are released to hear of any potential issues. A week after the updates are released by Microsoft we approve updates for the test group, if a week later none of the computers in the test group report any issues we then roll it out to the rest of the computers in the company.

    Wednesday, January 20, 2016 4:04 PM
  • Hi Smith,

    Agree with MikeeMiracle, we may approve updates for specific groups and rule out the test computer. If the above reply could answer your question, you may mark it as answer, if you have further questions, feel free to ask.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, January 21, 2016 7:15 AM
  • Oh wow quick response! and thank you! makes sense now.
    Thursday, January 21, 2016 3:40 PM