none
Configuration for a newbie

    Question

  • Hi everybody,

    I will really appreciate a professional opinion, as I do not have a lot of knowledge, basically coming from WHS, quite some time ago.

    I have a server running Windows 2012 R2, on a Proliant ML350 G6 with the following configuration:

    - drive C on sas drive 150GB

    - drive 1 (volume D), mirrored on drive 2, both of the drives are 2TB (SATA)

    - drive 3 (volume E), mirrored on drive 4, both of the drives are 2TB (SATA)

    - drive 5 is a CDROM (SATA)

    - drive 6 is open (SATA)

    I used the mirroring scheme as a backup, and it works just fine. I do not have problems with the server, but I'm reaching full capacity and I'm looking to upgrade maybe with another drive.

    I was planning to get a 10TB drive and have individual volumes to which to mirror current volumes (D & E), eventually having 4 individual drives/volumes (total of 8TB), all of them mirrored on the 10TB drive. Is this a viable configuration? The idea is to 1) still have redundancy and 2) double the space available. Will this put to much work on the 10TB drive, as it will take the work of the other 4 drives during mirroring?

    Thank you

    Vernon

    Thursday, May 10, 2018 7:03 PM

All replies

  • Hi Vernon,

    If possible, could you please show the screenshot for your configuration? (You could put that on the onedrive,share the link in the post).

    Based on my understanding, you set the software raid in the disk management, right?

     Windows built-in disk tool can only extend simple and spanned volume, excluding mirrored volume

    Please check the article for more details

    "You cannot extend a system volume, boot volume, striped volume, mirrored volume, or RAID-5 volume."

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/windows/it-pro/windows-server-2003/cc776741(v=ws.10)

    Since the Microsoft limit, I'm afraid, could be backup the data, delete the volume. Then choose another two larger disk and set the new mirrored volume. After that, recovery the data.

    If you don't want to do such operation, I'm afraid you may need to find if some 3rd party software could achieve this goal.

    Best Regards,

    Mary


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Friday, May 11, 2018 6:55 AM
    Moderator
  • "used the mirroring scheme as a backup, and it works just fine."

    Mirroring is never to be considered as a backup technology.  Bad data or corrupted data written to one volume is automatically written to the mirror volume.  The only way to perform a reliable backup, something you can use to recover your data to a known good state, is to perform a backup that copies the data to another destination and provides you with an auditable trail that allows you to go back in time to a known good point.  Mirroring cannot do that.

    Mirroring is a technology that protects against a hardware failure of the disks.  Should one disk fail, the other disk which is a mirror image, will continue serving up the data.  But it is not a backup technology.


    tim


    Friday, May 11, 2018 12:55 PM
  • Hi Vernon,

    You want the achieve this?

    "So, this is what I'm thinking:

     1. Add 10 TB drive on bay 6

     2. Create 2 volumes on this drive

     3. Copy data from current volumes (D &E) to these volumes on 10TB drive

     3. Format the drives that hold volumes D & E

     4. Mirror each volume on the 10TB drive to individual drives/volumes on individual drives.

     In this way my primary data stays on the 10TB drive, and it gets mirrored on individual volumes on separate drives, 2 TB each."

    I'm afraid you couldn't mirror the volume with only one disk.  You need two dynamic disks to create a mirrored volume

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/windows/it-pro/windows-server-2003/cc776202%28v%3dws.10%29

    Best Regards,

    Mary


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, May 14, 2018 1:48 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    Just checking in to see if the information provided was helpful. Please let us know if you would like further assistance.

    Best Regards,

    Mary


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, May 15, 2018 8:04 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,
    Could the above reply be of help? If yes, you may mark it as answer, if not, feel free to feed back
    Best Regards,
    Mary

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, May 16, 2018 7:37 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Mary,

    "I'm afraid you couldn't mirror the volume with only one disk.  You need two dynamic disks to create a mirrored volume".

    I'm planning to have dynamic disks, actually all of them will be dynamic, as in the scheme proposed in the file named server.jpg:  https://1drv.ms/f/s!AuQHSNEyEo6Em101xmk1Y3XsnN0R

    Each volume (2TB) on the main disk (10TB) will be mirrored to an individual disk.

    Is that a viable solution?

    Thank you so much,

    Vernon


    • Edited by topaz107 Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:24 AM
    Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:24 AM
  • Again, mirroring is not a backup technology.

    Secondly, you are mixing terms.  When you create a dynamic disk, it means just that - you are creating a software property on a physical disk.  So if you have a 10 TB physical disk which you have defined as dynamic, you cannot create multiple partitions on the disk, and define them as separate physical disks in order to mirror them with another physical disk.  The mirroring is performed at the physical level.


    tim

    Saturday, May 19, 2018 12:37 PM