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building Lync from nothing, what is the solution for pstn? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all

    I'm beginner in Lync, with question about traditional phone line tech to convert to voip

    my target is to "build Lync 2010 enviroment" between 3 different cities, 1 office per each city, and 2 to 3 pstn traditional telephone line per office.

    Headquarter  [city 1] ~ line1, line2, line3

    branch office1[city 2] ~ line4, line5

    branch office 2[city3] ~ line6, line7

    The plan is to that all offices communicate each other via VOIP, and if any office want to make call to target city local phone call goes though SIP to a branch Lync then local pstn, saving inter urban telephone feed.

    question is what do I need to connect the 2 or 3 local pstn lines to Lync server? do I need a IP PBX hardware or like a voice modem attach to a Lync mediation server?

    is there any sample or senario that I can take as example?

    Franklin

    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 7:23 PM

Answers

  • If you're talking about a true POTS (Plane Old Telephone System, a copper line running from the phone company to you) then you simply need a PSTN/SIP Gateway. I'd recommend the Dialog DMG Analog. In the simplest terms it takes PSTN on one side and Ethernet on the other. They come in 4 and 8 line Analog models.  Take a look at http://www.dialogic.com.

    You will need a Mediation Server to as well. The Mediation Server acts as a proxy for your Lync clients. Calles between Lync clients will bypass the Mediation Server and speak directly over the network. Calls out to the PSTN will route through the Mediation Server.

     


    - Marc LaFleur
    Thursday, October 14, 2010 4:25 AM
  • I would recommend talking with your ISP about a SIP trunk.  It would allow you to make PSTN IP calls through your data connection with them.  This allows you to have one circuit for both the internet and telephone calls.  I hate dealing with those pesky analog lines when there are SIP options available.  You should be able to make a direct SIP connection from the Lync mediation server to them.
    • Proposed as answer by Jeffrey Kelso Thursday, October 14, 2010 1:02 PM
    • Marked as answer by fhjs Friday, October 15, 2010 6:24 PM
    Thursday, October 14, 2010 1:00 PM
  • If you are asking if you can still use the same number, then the answer is yes.  You would simply port your current number over to your SIP provider.

    • Marked as answer by fhjs Friday, October 15, 2010 6:23 PM
    Friday, October 15, 2010 2:18 PM

All replies

  • If you're talking about a true POTS (Plane Old Telephone System, a copper line running from the phone company to you) then you simply need a PSTN/SIP Gateway. I'd recommend the Dialog DMG Analog. In the simplest terms it takes PSTN on one side and Ethernet on the other. They come in 4 and 8 line Analog models.  Take a look at http://www.dialogic.com.

    You will need a Mediation Server to as well. The Mediation Server acts as a proxy for your Lync clients. Calles between Lync clients will bypass the Mediation Server and speak directly over the network. Calls out to the PSTN will route through the Mediation Server.

     


    - Marc LaFleur
    Thursday, October 14, 2010 4:25 AM
  • I would recommend talking with your ISP about a SIP trunk.  It would allow you to make PSTN IP calls through your data connection with them.  This allows you to have one circuit for both the internet and telephone calls.  I hate dealing with those pesky analog lines when there are SIP options available.  You should be able to make a direct SIP connection from the Lync mediation server to them.
    • Proposed as answer by Jeffrey Kelso Thursday, October 14, 2010 1:02 PM
    • Marked as answer by fhjs Friday, October 15, 2010 6:24 PM
    Thursday, October 14, 2010 1:00 PM
  • If I have SIP TRUNK can I still preserve the old PSTN? (because of company representive number, to receive phone calls)


    Franklin
    Friday, October 15, 2010 2:16 PM
  • If you are asking if you can still use the same number, then the answer is yes.  You would simply port your current number over to your SIP provider.

    • Marked as answer by fhjs Friday, October 15, 2010 6:23 PM
    Friday, October 15, 2010 2:18 PM