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My laptop (HP Pavillion dv9000) with Windows 7 64-bit (RTM) is overheating to the point of shutting down frequently... RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have been using Windows 7 RC 32-bit from the time it was released. I had no issue with the bits. But as soon as I installed the RTM, this time, with 64-bit, my laptop is heating up so soon and fast. The fan is going full-speed but it cannot keep up with the heat. Now it is shutting down at random. Have you had any reports having similar problems like mine? Is there a solution for this?
    I hate to go back to 32-bit.
    Monday, September 21, 2009 3:48 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    It may be related to less silica gel attached to the CPU, as we all know, the silica gel helps CPU to radiate heat. It is recommended to send to IT technical getting more silica gel.

    Best Regards.
    Dale
    • Proposed as answer by ambulocetus27 Thursday, October 1, 2009 11:01 AM
    • Marked as answer by Dale Qiao Monday, October 12, 2009 3:18 AM
    Tuesday, September 29, 2009 2:21 AM
  • Performance and reliability issues with IE8 are often traced to add-ons.  Do you still encounter the described problems if you run IE8 with no extensions (iexplore.exe -extoff)?

    Regarding the overheating - have you considered running the "Intel® Processor Identification Utility"?
    • Marked as answer by Dale Qiao Monday, October 12, 2009 3:18 AM
    Sunday, October 4, 2009 11:23 PM

All replies

  • Ive had the same problem but with a Toshiba Laptop...
    What are your PC specs?
    You need to make sure that you have ALL of the latest drivers, especially for your GPU... Don't rely on Windows 7 to do that for you. Windows 64-Bit, is pretty resource intensive, so if your PC is not built to handle a 64-Bit OS, dont expect it to perform the way its supposed to.

    In my case, all i did was make sure the drivers are up to date, and if you have an Intel CPU, enable SpeedStep in the BIOS. 
    Or if you have an AMD CPU, enable Cool n' Quiet in the BIOS. 
    Make sure your Power Settings in Windows is NOT set to "High Performance" when your doing basic stuff like browsing the internet...

    Hope this helps,
    Fahd.

    FSR
    Monday, September 21, 2009 10:50 AM
  • Hi, Can you tell us, what are the spec's for this laptop. Until you get an answer. I would like to suggest you Stop using the 64bit RTM, because you could damage your CPU. You could reinstall Win 7 32bit, create another partition and put the 64bit RTM there. Use the dual boot to go between the 32bit & 64bit. Slan go foill, Paul   
    Monday, September 21, 2009 10:53 AM
  • The specs for the laptop from HP:

     

    Key Features

    Taking the show on the road is better than ever with the latest AMD Turion™ X64 dual-core

    (4,5,6) mobile processor. With AMD dual-core it makes it easy to handle demanding applications, while running background applications such as system backup and virus scans.

    Monday, September 21, 2009 6:32 PM
  • How do you "enable Cool n' Quiet in the BIOS" in the AMD CPU (Turin 64 dual core)?

    Thanks much.

    Casey
    Monday, September 21, 2009 6:34 PM
  • Restart the computer...then at the first boot screen depending on the motherboard maker it would show something like "Press Tab for Setup", or "Press Del for Setup" so just press that key quickly and it would take you into the BIOS. Once in, look for something called "Power Management" or similar, or just look around the menu's till you find Cool n' Quiet and make sure its enabled...then press ESC and make sure you select to save the settings if prompted...and your done!

    Hope this helps,
    Fahd

    FSR
    Monday, September 21, 2009 9:38 PM
  • Hi,

    Though you don't want to roll back to 32-bit Operating System, I kindly recommend you to dual boot Windows 7 32-bit with Windows 7 64-bit for test purpose. We need to make sure that the fan is working normally before taking further step. Meanwhile, how much CPU is used after entering Windows? You can launch Resource monitor to verify if any process uses abnormal CPU. Since the heat is mainly caused by power consuming, I would like to recommend you to run powercfg parameter to collect the energy efficiency report. Check if any device occupies abnormal power energy. To do this, please refer to this InfoSharing.

    Best Regards.
    Dale Qiao

    Thursday, September 24, 2009 8:16 AM
  • have you tried blowing out your vents w/ compressed air.  might be just a issue /w dirty fan and heatsink.  HP tech
    • Marked as answer by Dale Qiao Monday, September 28, 2009 1:50 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by Dale Qiao Monday, September 28, 2009 6:47 AM
    Thursday, September 24, 2009 11:55 AM
  • If I setup a dual boot, I need to create another partition in my drive for 32-bit. That means I need to wipe out the current hard drive in the process, isn't this true? Unless you know another way to preserve the current content of the hard drive. If I have to do this, I might well install only the 32-bit OS, because I didn't have any problem with it before.

    Regards,

    Casey
    Thursday, September 24, 2009 12:34 PM
  • Hi,

    We can visit this page without disturbing the current Operating System.

    Best Regards.
    Dale Qiao
    Friday, September 25, 2009 3:26 AM
  • I checked it out but it looks clean. My laptop is less than 2 years old in a clean environment. Thanks.
    Monday, September 28, 2009 4:49 AM
  • Hi,

    It may be related to less silica gel attached to the CPU, as we all know, the silica gel helps CPU to radiate heat. It is recommended to send to IT technical getting more silica gel.

    Best Regards.
    Dale
    • Proposed as answer by ambulocetus27 Thursday, October 1, 2009 11:01 AM
    • Marked as answer by Dale Qiao Monday, October 12, 2009 3:18 AM
    Tuesday, September 29, 2009 2:21 AM
  • I also have an HP DV9000 series laptop which ran cool under Vista with occaisional fan usage. I have now installed Windows 7 32 bit (MS partner version, presumably the same as commercial release). It now runs extremely hot even on power saver battery settings. I have to keep the back of it propped up to get air underneath.

    My personal view is that Windows 7 is placing extremely heavy resource demands on the machine (CPU, disc etc). This is demonstrated by the very poor performance times, regular crashes and unresponsive GUI. Many dialog boxes are not fully rendered (a symptom I last saw many years ago on RAM limited machines - I now have 2GB). 

    Given that this is a clean install with just MS office, visual studio and expression studio installed; and that with just IE8 or file explorer running that performance is MUCH slower than Vista I would suggest that the heating is down to hardware resource demands. The only partial fix I have been able to implement so far is to use Google Chome instead of IE8, which seems much more responsive and doesnt keep crashing. Since doing this fan usage is reduced.

    I have seen huge numbers of articles relating to poor windows 7 performance on the web, lets hope Microsoft fix this before our laptops melt !
    • Proposed as answer by ambulocetus27 Thursday, October 1, 2009 11:02 AM
    Thursday, October 1, 2009 11:02 AM
  • Performance and reliability issues with IE8 are often traced to add-ons.  Do you still encounter the described problems if you run IE8 with no extensions (iexplore.exe -extoff)?

    Regarding the overheating - have you considered running the "Intel® Processor Identification Utility"?
    • Marked as answer by Dale Qiao Monday, October 12, 2009 3:18 AM
    Sunday, October 4, 2009 11:23 PM
  • I have the same exact problem, but I found a solution(not a true fix, but it keeps my laptop from overheating). 
    In Control panelsystem and Securitypower options:

     Click Change plan settings, then click Change advanced power settings.  Expand Processor power management, then expand Maximum processor state.  Change those settings to 85%.  Press OK.


    The temperature is now on average 10degrees celcius cooler, and my computer doesn't overheat anymore.  I don't notice a drop in performance either.

    I have a dv800 with an amd turion ml-40 w/ windows media center xp 2005.  Upgraded to Windows 7 RC, it works great, to went to Windows 7 Home Premium, After watching video online(pr0n + Hulu) or messing with anything that uses alot of system resource, my pc would overheat.  I came to the conclusion windows 7 uses more of the cpu which causes higher temps, and since amd turions run hot in the first place, this it run that much hotter, which puts my cpu at an overheating risk, according to win 7.  My cpu was going upto 96 celcius, now it tops out at 85.  
    • Proposed as answer by maiop Tuesday, February 16, 2010 1:11 AM
    Tuesday, February 16, 2010 1:06 AM
  • I had an overheating DV9000 (Intel CPU). It worked for about 3 years before the left screen screw mounts broke and the NVIDIA chip overheated and blow out. I reflowed the NVIDIA BGA assembly myself and made improvements the air flow. I also learned to program my fan to run faster. I did it by patching the BIOS ACPI DSTS that controls the speed of the fan so now the GPU stays between 49C and 58C even running games. I searched for months before figuring out how to do this. If you are interested in doing this you can read about it at “How I Fixed My Overheating HP DV9000 Computer: Software Solution: Patching the DSDT” (http://icodehead.blogspot.com/2010/07/how-i-fixed-my-hp-dv9000-computer_02.html#Section3.4.2). My code will work for DV9000 and DV6000 (Intel CPU) running BIOS F.29, F.2D and F.2E. There are many sites you can find to help for other computers.

    Friday, July 9, 2010 3:32 AM