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got computer a month ago HUGE problems w/ Vista RRS feed

  • Question

  • I bought my computer just over a month ago. It didn't say I couldn't change the names of the blue folders so I tried to change mine to match my old computer. Then I had duplicate files and I wanted to get rid of one. Vista said there wasn't room in my recycle bin for the files with long names, did I want to try again, and it completely removed my docs. So much hard work lost. No way to get the files back, not in recycle bin (the names were too long... now I get it)

    I wonder if Windows 7 will fix these problems and not run so slow as Vista. Is 7 free for people who just bought Vista and it was such a HUGE problem?
    Saturday, July 4, 2009 6:57 PM

Answers

  • I want to know if in 7 the folders can have names changed. I found it less confusing to use XP when my file folders were My Documents to start with, not Documents and then inside, My Documents. I wanted to get rid of one layer so that the blue folder, Documents would just be My Documents.

    I want to know if 7 has been adjusted so that it won't destroy documents the way that Vista did for me. Do you know?

    Now it became clear to me what has really happened. In both Vista and Win7
    the canonical XP names for "blue" folders (My Documents, My Pictures, etc.) were shortened
    to just  Documents, Pictures, etc. At the same time old names are saved for compatibility
    reasons, but now they are not the real folders, but just kind of links to them. For example,
    "My document" is the link to "Documents". So, if one tries to rename "Documents" to
    already existing (not accessible from Windows Explorer, but accessible from other file managers,
    like Total Commander) "My Documents" then the consequences
    may turn out to be catastrophic.

    But it may turn out as well that Your documents folder is really not deleted.
    You can try to find Your disappeared files inside the folder
    "C:\users\YourLoginName\Documents". Or, may be, "My Documents"
    instead of Documents, I do, not know.

    And, of course, Win7 in this respect (names and behavior of "blue" folders)
    is identical with that of Vista.
    • Proposed as answer by piepaw Monday, July 6, 2009 4:05 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sean Zhu -Moderator Monday, July 13, 2009 3:22 AM
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 4:33 PM

All replies

  • Thanks, I would just like to say that I don't think it's fair to make a crumby operating system, sell it in computers, and then force people (who want a fix for all the problems) to have to buy the fix.

    Thanks, though.
    Saturday, July 4, 2009 8:10 PM
  • All problems are ultimately by people's own hand.

    I bought a Toshiba computer. I wanted one because I liked the one I had before, which had XP on it.

    As far as I know Toshiba doesn't have any other operating systems than stupid Vista? Do you know of any? I get so angry when people blame the victim. It's horrid, and it's angry making.

    Vista did not tell me that I could not change the names of the blue files. The MS tech told me that the files are system files so they can't be changed. But Vista didn't tell me that, all Vista told me was that my file names were too long to fit into recycle.

    Well, how can a file name be too long to fit into the recycle bin? I don't think it can except that the operating system was badly made.

    Because the file names were so long, which they are because of my disability, Vista destroyed all my documents that I had made using it. Wooo Hoooo. That's not a hot operating system in my estimation!

    The MS tech looked in the recycle bin... lol... for $59. I was not amused.

    You just like to jump on people you feel are weaker than you!
    Saturday, July 4, 2009 9:46 PM
  • Oh dear, aren't you clever? So brilliantly tongue in cheek. I'm awed.

    I would suggest that MS make it's system give a warning if there are folders that look like folder in XP except for their color, but only these folders will destroy your documents if you try to rename them.

    :)
    Saturday, July 4, 2009 11:46 PM
  • I am curious about this.  What on earth is a "blue folder"???  What folder names did you change that proved so fatal to their contents?

    To be more helpful, have you tried data recovery software to recover your deleted files?

    At the core, Windows 7 is similar to Vista so if Vista went wrong for you it is pretty likely Windows 7 would do the same under the same circumstances. 



    Sunday, July 5, 2009 10:24 AM
  • I don't know, doesn't your Vista have blue folders when you click on Documents, under Start? And, don't you have blue folders when you open Windows Explorer?

    I believe Microsoft should have a warning message about changing the names if the result is so disastrous.

    I think the recycle bin should be able to hold documents with very long names, not just destroy them because "there isn't enough room" -- That just is negligent to make the recycle bin have that kind of short coming with such disastrous results for those who need long names.

    I would have thought the MS tech would have mentioned data recovery. He didn't, he said that everything was permanently lost.

    Is Windows 7 just as slow? Vista takes so long to do things, and this new computer has a faster speed than my old computer. Do you think I could put the XP games (Spider Solitaire, Hearts and Free Cell) on the Windows 7? I asked about putting them on Vista and no one ever responded, so I guess that means it's impossible.
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 2:06 PM
  • what does that mean that the "type" was changed? Why was it changed? Is that the font? or the kind of question I asked?
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 2:33 PM
  • Are you saying I'm not asking a question? I am asking a question. I want to know if in 7 the folders can have names changed. I found it less confusing to use XP when my file folders were My Documents to start with, not Documents and then inside, My Documents. I wanted to get rid of one layer so that the blue folder, Documents would just be My Documents.

    I want to know if 7 has been adjusted so that it won't destroy documents the way that Vista did for me. Do you know?
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 2:36 PM
  • Oh, I see, you took away the question mark. The question mark should be there. Else how can anyone possibly answer?

    Boy, it's tiring trying to get help with ms products. It's very frustrating. And depressing. And, that is a comment.

    My question is, if MS makes nearly everyone buy their operating systems, why isn't there some proper support? not this changing of questions to comments, so that there's absolutely NO help???????
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 2:39 PM
  • What a put down, ms takes no responsibility and that is unconscionable.
    I did not buy my computer from Wal*Mart, thank you very much for the put down of a place that has things the majority of the population (who don't get paid by Microsoft for fleecing people) can afford to buy.l

    I don't know what you mean about the filepath. Where does the operating system tell me about that?

    My laptop is STRONG. How irritating that ms takes no responsibility for the horrors it puts on people.

    I have more than 2 gig of ram, thank you!

    If there is a way to recover data, then why did the ms tech tell me that there was no way, "NO WAY" to get the documents back?
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 3:48 PM
  • I want to know if in 7 the folders can have names changed. I found it less confusing to use XP when my file folders were My Documents to start with, not Documents and then inside, My Documents. I wanted to get rid of one layer so that the blue folder, Documents would just be My Documents.

    I want to know if 7 has been adjusted so that it won't destroy documents the way that Vista did for me. Do you know?

    Now it became clear to me what has really happened. In both Vista and Win7
    the canonical XP names for "blue" folders (My Documents, My Pictures, etc.) were shortened
    to just  Documents, Pictures, etc. At the same time old names are saved for compatibility
    reasons, but now they are not the real folders, but just kind of links to them. For example,
    "My document" is the link to "Documents". So, if one tries to rename "Documents" to
    already existing (not accessible from Windows Explorer, but accessible from other file managers,
    like Total Commander) "My Documents" then the consequences
    may turn out to be catastrophic.

    But it may turn out as well that Your documents folder is really not deleted.
    You can try to find Your disappeared files inside the folder
    "C:\users\YourLoginName\Documents". Or, may be, "My Documents"
    instead of Documents, I do, not know.

    And, of course, Win7 in this respect (names and behavior of "blue" folders)
    is identical with that of Vista.
    • Proposed as answer by piepaw Monday, July 6, 2009 4:05 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sean Zhu -Moderator Monday, July 13, 2009 3:22 AM
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 4:33 PM
  • Thanks Vlad, I think you may have described it. I'm not able to follow what you wrote exactly. But I can sort of see what you're saying because I think that is what happened, and I think the ms tech would not have told me you can't change a system folder without problems if it weren't something like that.

    Which is why I say that ms should have a warning box that comes up if someone tries to make their Vista be like their XP.

    The tech looked in the recycle bin and used the search function, and the docs weren't there.

    Because I use Google Desktop I was able to find an unformatted cached copy of the interrogatories I'd done that had taken huge time. But everything else was basically gone because there are SO many cached documents that it makes it nearly impossible to go through them all to find certain ones.

    Thank you. A lot.

    I do wish MS would make a warning box for that. Please?
    Sunday, July 5, 2009 4:39 PM
  • This thread has been heavily edited, making it hard to make sense of some of the contributions.

    May I repeat that there is a wealth of software designed to help people in Consider This' position; needing to recover lost files that are not in the Recycle Bin.  When you delete a file (intentionally or otherwise) what gets removed is the "index entry" that enables the computer to find the file.  The file itself will remain on the computer until it gets overwitten by something else (as the computer now sees the space it occupies on the hard drive as free).  Specialised data recovery software will search for and recover these "invisible" files. 

    Monday, July 6, 2009 8:53 AM