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MS Project 2010 Pro - Using 10 Hr / Day, 5 Days / Week AND 24 Hr / Day, 6 Days / Week In Same Project RRS feed

  • Question

  • How does one implement the scheduling of the following activities in one project?

    Activity 1: 10 Hr / Day, 5 Days /  Week

    Activity 2: 24 Hr / Day, 6 Days / Week

    Detailed steps would be greatly appreciated.  It is assumed different calendars will be needed but how to ensure Finish Dates are correct.

    Thank you for you time in advance.

    Sunday, November 18, 2012 7:01 PM

Answers

  • del_ops,

    Yes, that is a dilemma. Project only provides for one definition of a day. Let me make a suggestion. Instead of entering or thinking about duration in days, think and enter it in hours. Then you don't really care about the definition of a day. So, a task using calendar 1 will have a duration of 10 hours for its "day" and a task using calendar 2 would have a duration of 24 hours for its "day".

    Remember, the day definition only affects fields that Project displays as days (e.g. Duration fields). Start and Finish fields are determined by the work calendar associated with a given task, and potentially any custom resource calendars assigned to the task. You can get a better feel for this if you set the date fields to display time as well as date.

    To answer your question directly, yes if you set the definition of a day to be 10 hours, then a task using the 24 hour calendar would need to show 2.4 days duration to cover one full 24 hour period.

    John

    • Marked as answer by del_ops Monday, November 19, 2012 6:10 PM
    Monday, November 19, 2012 5:33 PM

All replies

  • For the majority of tasks, set the Project calendar to the relevant hrs per day. For remaining tasks:

    1. Select them then press Shift+F2 (Task Information)
    2. Select Advanced tab
    3. Select the other calendar in the Calendar drop down

    If hours are determined by Resources, then View the Resource Sheet and set each resource to the relevant Base calendar.

    I would experiment with a test project with a few tasks first before changing your main schedule!


    Rod Gill

    The one and only Project VBA Book

    Rod Gill Project Management

    Sunday, November 18, 2012 9:00 PM
    Moderator
  • del_ops,

    You are correct, either modify the existing standard calendar for a normal 10 hour day, or better yet, create a new custom calendar based on the standard. Don't forget to reset the schedule options for default start and end times, these should probably track with the 10 hour day calendar. Then create another calendar for 24 hour day, 6 days per week.

    Detail steps for the above are Project/Change Working Time. In the Change Working Time window you may want to set exceptions for holidays or other company days off. Hit the Work Weeks tab and then the Details button to set up your working hours for each day. The 10 hour day should be pretty straightforward based on your start time, lunch if applicable, and end time in the From and To boxes. You will have to set up these times for each day separately. For the 24 hour calendar your start time would be 12:00 am and your end time is also 12:00 am, unless you need/want to also include lunch breaks, then you'll need more entries.

    However the most important question to answer is, what do you want to define as a "day"? For tasks using the 24 hour calendar a "day" would be 24 hours, but for the 10 hour calendar, I'm guessing it represents salaried workers who normally work an 8 hour day, in this case with perhaps 2 hours overtime. There is only one setting for the definition of a day (File/Options/Schedule tab/Hours per day), so you will have to decide which to use. Project will use that definition for all duration calculations. The calendars associated with each task will determine start and finish dates and times.

    It can get a little complicated, but once you have it set up it should give what you need.

    Hope this helps.

    John

    Sunday, November 18, 2012 9:04 PM
  • Thanks Rod and John.

    This is my dilemma - the definition of the day.

    Would it not be true (and cumbersome) to define the day as 10 hours but when a task using the 24 Hr schedule is scheduled, that 24 Hr task needs to be 2.4 'Days' in duration?

    The answer to this is crucial for me moving forward.

    Again, thanks, guys.

    Monday, November 19, 2012 4:16 PM
  • del_ops,

    Yes, that is a dilemma. Project only provides for one definition of a day. Let me make a suggestion. Instead of entering or thinking about duration in days, think and enter it in hours. Then you don't really care about the definition of a day. So, a task using calendar 1 will have a duration of 10 hours for its "day" and a task using calendar 2 would have a duration of 24 hours for its "day".

    Remember, the day definition only affects fields that Project displays as days (e.g. Duration fields). Start and Finish fields are determined by the work calendar associated with a given task, and potentially any custom resource calendars assigned to the task. You can get a better feel for this if you set the date fields to display time as well as date.

    To answer your question directly, yes if you set the definition of a day to be 10 hours, then a task using the 24 hour calendar would need to show 2.4 days duration to cover one full 24 hour period.

    John

    • Marked as answer by del_ops Monday, November 19, 2012 6:10 PM
    Monday, November 19, 2012 5:33 PM
  • I think I got it.  Thank you very much John.

    So, I go to File | Options | Project Options | Schedule | Scheduling options for this project: and set "Duration is entered in:" to hours.  Now, I just need to enter the duration in hours and the Start and Finish Dates will be correctly calculated even for the 24 Hr Day while using the definition of a day as 10 Hr because the entered Duration in hours is used to calculate the Start/Finish from its assigned calendar.  So, the definition of a day is trivial.

    Correct?

    Monday, November 19, 2012 6:25 PM
  • del_ops,

    Yep, that's right. We think of a "day" from our own perspective and I think it's safe to say that for most of us that is 8 hours in a normal work day. And indeed the default setting of a day for Project has always been 8 hours. When paired with the standard calendar which has 8 hours of work time, durations and dates work out very nicely - a "day" becomes the working time equivalent of a normal 24 hour clock. When there is more than one work shift things get a little more complicated. It may or may not be beneficial to stick with a duration dimension of a "day". If you can wrap your head around how Project uses the definition of a day, you can stick with it and go from there, but normally the more important parameters to a user are the start and finish dates for tasks.

    One other thought to keep in mind. In Project duration is simply the measurement for the passage of time. It does not accomplish anything. If you separate work from duration, as you should, then work becomes the more important parameter and in most cases, at least in American culture, work is thought of and expressed in hours or man-hours. Work is a direct measure of accomplishment. When all that is considered, then the definition of a day does have less significance.

    John

    Monday, November 19, 2012 8:00 PM
  • Again, thank you so much John.

    This situation has eluded me for some time.

    Monday, November 19, 2012 9:50 PM
  • del_ops,

    You're welcome and thanks for the feedback. We try to find the "eluded".

    John

    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 2:21 AM