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Windows 8/8.1 slow boot (sudden onset) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can anyone help with a slow boot problem on Windows 8/8.1, please?  This concerns an Asus Zenbook.  It's about 15 months old, and has always booted very quickly.  Now, all of a sudden, it takes 5 minutes to get beyond the Windows logo screen.  I have tried all the standard things (clean boot, turn off Asus Fast Boot, etc), up to and including Resetting Windows.  No good: on either Windows 8 or 8.1, it still takes 5 minutes.  I have looked at the Windows System Log, and the delay occurs right at the beginning of the Boot process.  E.g., on the most recent boot I see as the first 3 entries (note, I'm in Europe, so dates are dd/mm/yyyy, and times are in 24-hour clock):

    Information    10/03/2014 19:36:23    Kernel-General    12    None The operating system started at system time ‎2014‎-‎03‎-‎10T19:36:23.490074300Z.

    Information    10/03/2014 19:36:23    Kernel-Boot    30    None The firmware reported boot metrics.

    Information    10/03/2014 19:40:26    FilterManager    6    None File System Filter 'FileInfo' (6.3, ‎2013‎-‎08‎-‎22T11:38:45.000000000Z) has successfully loaded and registered with Filter Manager.

    and you can see the 4-minute gap between the 2nd and 3rd entries.  That's where the delay always comes, though sometimes the "reported boot metrics" doesn't show.

    A little later in the procedure I do always get the following warning:

    Warning    10/03/2014 19:40:31    Kernel-PnP    219    (212)  The driver \Driver\WudfRd failed to load for the device ACPI\ACPI0008\2&daba3ff&2.

    However because that comes later I can't see how it can be causing the problem, and I suspect it's an independent issue.

    The machine appears to run normally once booted.  It is protected against viruses by Windows Defender.  I have looked at many posts on this and other fora on slow boot, and tried everything suggested, but none of the solutions have worked.  I have also looked widely on the web for problems with the File System Filter but nothing relevant comes up.  The machine is under warranty, and could be sent back, but that would be a serious pain so if there is a solution I can implement I would much prefer to do so.  Thank you for looking at this.


    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students


    • Edited by seglea Monday, March 10, 2014 8:13 PM
    Monday, March 10, 2014 8:11 PM

Answers

  • Seglea

    Though not definitive there are over 200 seconds of incrase due in part to the HD thrashing.  I would defrag and run CHKDSK as a first step

    CHKDSK /R /F
    Chkdsk disclaimer: While performing chkdsk on the hard drive if any bad sectors are found  any data available on that sector might be lost so as usual backup your data.
    Run CHKDSK /R /F from an elevated (Run as administrator) Command Prompt.
    Do this for each hard drive on your system.
    When it tells you it can't do it right now - and asks you if you'd like to do it at the next reboot - answer Y (for Yes) and press Enter.

    Then reboot and let the test run.
    It may take a while for it to run, but keep an occasional eye on it to see if it generates any errors.
    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/guide-to-using-check-disk-in-windows-vista/


     See "CHKDSK LogFile" below in order to check the results of the test.

    CHKDSK LogFile:

    Go to Start and type in "eventvwr.msc" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    Expand the Windows logs heading, then select the Application log file entry.
    Double click on the Source column header.
    Scroll down the list until you find the Chkdsk entry (wininit for Win7) (winlogon for XP).
    Copy/paste the results into your next post. 


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, March 12, 2014 1:46 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • To find what is causing a computer to boot more slowly than normal you need to run this
    Open a CMD prompt with administrative rights (right click it>run as admin) and run this command for 60 secs to start the process

    It will reboot your computer so save all your data before you do the below

    *

    As normal it is always a good idea to create a restore point &/or back up your data.
    xbootmgr -trace boot -traceflags base+latency+dispatcher -stackwalk profile+cswitch+readythread -notraceflagsinfilename -postbootdelay 10


    When it is done it will create a file (usually boot_1.etl) which you can search for.  Find the file and upload it to your skydrive and give us a link to the file in your next post

    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Monday, March 10, 2014 8:34 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for the advice, and especially for that detailed command line - I would have struggled to get that right.  Here is a link to the boot_1.eti file in the Public folder of my skydrive:

    https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=71A9855B9D8F8BC8!518&authkey=!AHLaxV0lBmknYqA&ithint=file%2c.etl

    I'll be very interested to hear if it makes it apparent what is going on.


    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students

    Tuesday, March 11, 2014 9:36 PM
  • Seglea

    Though not definitive there are over 200 seconds of incrase due in part to the HD thrashing.  I would defrag and run CHKDSK as a first step

    CHKDSK /R /F
    Chkdsk disclaimer: While performing chkdsk on the hard drive if any bad sectors are found  any data available on that sector might be lost so as usual backup your data.
    Run CHKDSK /R /F from an elevated (Run as administrator) Command Prompt.
    Do this for each hard drive on your system.
    When it tells you it can't do it right now - and asks you if you'd like to do it at the next reboot - answer Y (for Yes) and press Enter.

    Then reboot and let the test run.
    It may take a while for it to run, but keep an occasional eye on it to see if it generates any errors.
    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/guide-to-using-check-disk-in-windows-vista/


     See "CHKDSK LogFile" below in order to check the results of the test.

    CHKDSK LogFile:

    Go to Start and type in "eventvwr.msc" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    Expand the Windows logs heading, then select the Application log file entry.
    Double click on the Source column header.
    Scroll down the list until you find the Chkdsk entry (wininit for Win7) (winlogon for XP).
    Copy/paste the results into your next post. 


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, March 12, 2014 1:46 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for doing the analysis; I will try the CHKDSK.  Just a quick check before I do...  Obviously it's the system disk that is going to have to be checked, so what does "backup your data" mean?  Could I lose the operating system, or installed programs?  If so I'm going to have to wait to do this, as I'm travelling shortly, and won't have everything I'd need to rebuild the system with me.  I do have a system recovery disk, which I could take with me.

    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students

    Wednesday, March 12, 2014 9:29 PM
  • Seglea

    You should be backing up to begin with and in this case it is just an added precaution I needed to tell you about just to be sure.

    If it is a HD and you don't run the tests it could die on you while you are away which would you prefer?


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, March 12, 2014 10:15 PM
    Moderator
  • Seglea

    You should be backing up to begin with and in this case it is just an added precaution I needed to tell you about just to be sure.

    If it is a HD and you don't run the tests it could die on you while you are away which would you prefer?


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag


    Yes, fair point.  There's no data on the machine anyway, only software.  I'll post the outcome when I've done the chkdsk.  Ah, haven't done one of those for best part of 20 years...

    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students

    Wednesday, March 12, 2014 10:49 PM
  • Seglea

    CHKDSK is fairly benign and usually doesn't cause any problems.  Just had to warn ya'


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, March 12, 2014 11:46 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks... I have gone ahead and tried this, but CHKDSK got stuck at 13%.  After waiting for it about an hour, I left it overnight, and the machine had booted up in the morning.  But there was no Chkdsk entry in the Applications log; I think that the system probably crashed and restarted without Chkdsk (I thought I saw that happen on an earlier attempt).  I suspect this means that there are indeed some bad blocks or something on the disk (it's an SSD), and I'll have to keep chipping away at it with various tools till it will run clean.  I am going off on a trip now so cannot pursue this any further for the moment - I'll just have to hope the machine stays viable, albeit slow on the uptake, while I'm away.  I'll pick this thread up again when I return, and report progress.  Many thanks for your help so far; I look forward to interacting further in a little while.

    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 10:05 PM
  • Thanks for your interest... nothing definitive yet, and I have to put the issue to sleep for a couple of weeks (see above).  With regard to your earlier post, no, no major new installations (no doubt some updates); and Malwarebytes runs clean.

    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 10:07 PM
  • Thanks... I have gone ahead and tried this, but CHKDSK got stuck at 13%.  After waiting for it about an hour, I left it overnight, and the machine had booted up in the morning.  But there was no Chkdsk entry in the Applications log; I think that the system probably crashed and restarted without Chkdsk (I thought I saw that happen on an earlier attempt).  I suspect this means that there are indeed some bad blocks or something on the disk (it's an SSD), and I'll have to keep chipping away at it with various tools till it will run clean.  I am going off on a trip now so cannot pursue this any further for the moment - I'll just have to hope the machine stays viable, albeit slow on the uptake, while I'm away.  I'll pick this thread up again when I return, and report progress.  Many thanks for your help so far; I look forward to interacting further in a little while.

    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students

    ok if chkdsk choked, get a new hard disk, the one you have is likely borked

    clonezilla can clone a disk and it can deal with borked disks to an extent


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    Thursday, March 13, 2014 10:17 PM
  • Just to close this one down, for the sake of anyone looking for help from it: I agreed with Vegan Fanatic's assessment that the hard disk was probably shot, and took the machine back to the shop where I bought it for service under its 2-year warranty.  After rather more delay than promised, it was sent back from repair, I went to collect it, the service centre said, "We'll just start it up for you sir, so you can see it is working all right", pressed the button... and it took 5 minutes to boot.  I think it may have been jamming at a different point in the sequence than before, but neither I nor the service centre felt like investigating; they offered me a brand new machine as a replacement in about 15 seconds flat, and I agreed in a similar time.  Moral: if you have this problem, you'd better hope you bought your machine from a responsible retailer; I heartily recommend johnlewis.com.  Thank you to everyone who replied on this thread; your discussion was a real help in deciding what to do.

    There are no stupid rats, only misguided students

    Wednesday, June 4, 2014 7:28 PM
  • Hi Seglea,

    I have exact the same issue as you have! The only difference is the time period the splash screen / logo screen with the dots spinning in a circle hangs / delays / freezes: exactly 120 seconds. You can set your watch to that delay. During these 120 seconds nothing happens, no HDD LED activity, just nothing. Having passed the 120 s, the HDD LED begins to flicker and the logon screen is displayed 15 s later. 

    For the first look at it, I believe that it is a timeout problem. Usually Windows services retry to start after just these 120 seconds (e.g. Software Protection is configured this way, but in my case it does not start although configured as auto delayed). I believe that the clue is to find out which service causes this delay.

    My event logs are exactly the same as yours (without boot metrics), I do also have your WudRfd warning!

    When started, the machine operates in a fast and stable way, as if nothing harmful had ever happened.

    I do also have an SSD installed as only (system) disk.

    In my case the startup screen of the BIOS also stays visible for more than 10 seconds, longer as on any other computer I have had before. I also had problems during installation of Windows 8.1. After the first reboot during OS installation the BIOS POST screen restarted in an endless loop. I could solve that problem by setting the dedicated internal Graphics memory to less than 1024M, although I own 32 GBytes of RAM.

    Nothing helped so far, I permuted my BIOS settings, even Fast Boot or Ultra Fast Boot did not help.

    I have installed the latest drivers, I even tried to update the firmware of my SSD, but Intels toolbox told me, that my 3 years old 520 series SSD (never had seen any firmware updates before) was up-to date! Thus Windows 8.1 should handle with it. I also did a quick analyzation with the tools, but everything was ok.

    I just run chkdsk /r /f, as Zigzag proposed, but I had nearly the same problems as you have had:

    Chkdsk got stuck at 10 % for 10 minutes then the machine rebooted with the 2 minutes delay and event logs do not show any Checkdisk entry.

    In the Applications log, I noticed a igfxCUIService1.0.0.0 sourced entry as the first entry after reboot approximately 2 minutes after the end of the delay: The description of the event-ID "0" from the source "igfxCUIService1.0.0.0" could not be found. Event: started/resumed which sounds ok. But it says that the component that caused this event, is not installed. (my translation from the German log)

    The device manager shows that everything is fine and working well.

    Here's my System constellation:

    Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H, Intel Ivy Processor i7-3770 with 32 GBytes RAM, Intel 520 Series SSD via SATA 6G, BD Writer from LG via SATA 3G

    BIOS F20e with UEFI and Secure Boot enabled (Windows 8.1 did install the GPT partitions):

    Fast Boot enabled/disabled doesn't bother,  Intel Virtualization  Technoloy Enabled, VT-d enabled, OS Type Windows 8, Network Stack disabled, Secure Boot Mode standard,  AHCI, USB 3.0 xHCI, Internal Graphics Size now 32M, (didn't bother up to 512M, 1024M BIOS POST-screen endless loop), Intel Rapid Start Technology Enabled (disabled same effect) => I installed Windows 8.1 with "Intel SATA Preinstall driver For AHCI  RAID Mode" in the F6 mode, as Intel recommended, Marvell ATA Controller for eSATA (disabling same effect), ErP same effects on dis/enabled.

     Windows 8.1 Pro German. Same effect when with or without LAN connected

    I am thinking of Reinstalling Windows 8 with CSM mode without UEFI, but I believe that would not have any effect. Maybe I'll try another system disk for a reinstallation (HDD or other older SSD).

    It would be nice if this problem could be solved by the community or by Microsoft, since I am not the only one!

    Peter

    Saturday, June 21, 2014 4:53 PM
  • I have exactly the same problem.. Done a fresh install of windows 8.. Installed all available updates. Finally updated to 8.1 and encounter a LONG wait with black screen (3-4 minutes) before machine logo appears and windows starts to boot. No third party software is installed other than basics that came with acer.

    Once booted the machine runs absolutely fine.

    Thursday, July 10, 2014 2:25 PM
  • Peter,

    You ever find a solution to the 3-4 min spinning circle upon boot. Clean 8.1 OS image working on many other Dell models including the E6520.  I am also using a SSD drive.

    Wednesday, February 3, 2016 4:52 PM
  • Ed,

    You ever find a solution to the 3-4 min spinning circle. Clean 8.1 OS image working on many other Dell models including the E6520.  I am also using a SSD drive.

    Wednesday, February 3, 2016 4:52 PM
  • Hello. I have a Dell E5470 laptop with a Crucial MX300 SSD and experience the same issue. I have a fresh install of Windows 8.1 Pro x64. At first, it was fine, then somewhere along the update process, it just began to lag on the Windows 8 startup screen (with the spinning circles). I have timed it 3 times and have found it to be about 120 seconds each time. The SSD indicator light does nothing during that time. It's like the computer is waiting for something. After it gets past the startup circles, the login screen takes no time at all. Everything else seems to be perfect from there. Sooooo confusing and frustrating when your SSD laptop boots slower than your average HDD!
    Friday, March 23, 2018 12:39 AM