none
Why Microsoft? Why? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am the admin of a reasonably small network (300 users).  As such, I wear multiple hats.

     

    Microsoft, in their infinite wisdom, removed the email tools from ADUC.  I have to use the clunky Exchange 2010 Management tools. With that tool, my AD structure is moot.  Locating specific objects is tedious and time consuming. 

     

    It now takes literally twice as long to accomplish the same tasks then in the 2003 world.  It's so very frustrating.  A very sarcastic 'thanks' to MS.

     

    Sorry, had to vent somewhere where others will, I'm sure, agree.

     

    OCH

    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 4:15 PM

Answers

  • I agree that it can make some things harder (it was nice seeing everything in one "pane" before).  I think they did it more for larger rollouts where the person managing AD and the one managing exchange were not the same person.  It does help when looking at the "role based security" model to have them seperated.

    It is REALLY fun when you have exchange 2003 and 2010 in the same company hehe, we havent finished migrating our international users yet, so we manage them via aduc, and our US users via EMC/EMS lol

    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:32 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 8:12 PM
  • Meanwhile, I'm performing tedious tasks in minutes instead of hours because I can do it in powershell via the EMS. I rarely edit anything via the EMC. I'll use it for a quick look at something, but not much more than that. Microsoft even gave you a button to see the powershell of any changes you are going to make via EMC.

    Learn Powershell. It's not hard, and you'll have a marketable skill. Learning new skills is part of working in this field. Ignore this at your (career) peril.

    That said, if you insist on viewing your mailboxes by Organizational Unit in EMC, you can always add the Organizational Unit column to your various Recipient Configuration nodes, and sort by that. It will accomplish the "organize by my AD structure" model you're looking for. 

     

     

    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:32 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 8:53 PM
  • Locating specific objects is tedious and time consuming. 

    Have you explored using the built-in find feature? Go to Recipient Configuration, and then click on Mailbox or Distribution List for whatever you're looking for. Right-click "Mailbox" for example and there is a Find option. Type the first few characters of what you want to find and it should come back quickly.


    Microsoft Premier Field Engineer, Exchange
    MCSA 2000/2003, CCNA
    MCITP: Enterprise Messaging Administrator 2010
    Former Microsoft MVP, Exchange Server
    My posts are provided “AS IS” with no guarantees, no warranties, and they confer no rights.
    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:33 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 8:53 PM
  • With the right permissions, you can do everything within EMC and Powershell and not need to use ADUC.
    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:33 AM
    Thursday, April 7, 2011 1:13 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi

    You are new to Exchange 2010 so you maybe not used to Exchange 2010. You should also see the advantages when you find its disadvantage. As the below mentioned above, Exchange 2010 provides more high available, such as improved information worker access, increased the database maximum size, configuring outlook anywhere to provide external access to Exchange 2010 for your clients and so on.

    In particular, for Exchange Management Shell, once you are very familiar with it, you will feel it so convenient because you can do everything in it.

    For more information about Exchange 2010, you can refer to Microsoft official website: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb124558.aspx

    Hope it helps.

    Thanks


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:33 AM
    Friday, April 8, 2011 3:36 AM

All replies

  • This has been the cawe for years, starting with Exchange 2007.

    Why does this make your AD structure moot?

     

     

    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 4:47 PM
    Moderator
  • I agree that it can make some things harder (it was nice seeing everything in one "pane" before).  I think they did it more for larger rollouts where the person managing AD and the one managing exchange were not the same person.  It does help when looking at the "role based security" model to have them seperated.

    It is REALLY fun when you have exchange 2003 and 2010 in the same company hehe, we havent finished migrating our international users yet, so we manage them via aduc, and our US users via EMC/EMS lol

    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:32 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 8:12 PM
  • Meanwhile, I'm performing tedious tasks in minutes instead of hours because I can do it in powershell via the EMS. I rarely edit anything via the EMC. I'll use it for a quick look at something, but not much more than that. Microsoft even gave you a button to see the powershell of any changes you are going to make via EMC.

    Learn Powershell. It's not hard, and you'll have a marketable skill. Learning new skills is part of working in this field. Ignore this at your (career) peril.

    That said, if you insist on viewing your mailboxes by Organizational Unit in EMC, you can always add the Organizational Unit column to your various Recipient Configuration nodes, and sort by that. It will accomplish the "organize by my AD structure" model you're looking for. 

     

     

    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:32 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 8:53 PM
  • Locating specific objects is tedious and time consuming. 

    Have you explored using the built-in find feature? Go to Recipient Configuration, and then click on Mailbox or Distribution List for whatever you're looking for. Right-click "Mailbox" for example and there is a Find option. Type the first few characters of what you want to find and it should come back quickly.


    Microsoft Premier Field Engineer, Exchange
    MCSA 2000/2003, CCNA
    MCITP: Enterprise Messaging Administrator 2010
    Former Microsoft MVP, Exchange Server
    My posts are provided “AS IS” with no guarantees, no warranties, and they confer no rights.
    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:33 AM
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011 8:53 PM
  • I think he was mainly lamenting the fact of using 2 admin tools (emc and aduc) for user management as opposed to the way it worked in 2003 where it was all contained in ADUC. There is some efficiency lost when you have to use multiple tools to do what used to be done via one.

    For those admins that do wear many hats, powershell is something they use sparingly, as such it makes the job much harder than when everything was done via gui because its hard to remember all those command when you dont use them often.  I agree everyone is going to have to learn powershell whether they want to or not, however the original poster does have a point that it doesnt help him in his job to be forced to learn it to do tasks via powershell that he used to do quickly via a gui.

    Personally, I think everything should be available via gui and powershell, I prefer powershell when i have to do something that requires bulk changes, but for day to day stuff that changes (i.e. not repetitive stuff), its easier to use a gui.  Both have their uses :)

    Thursday, April 7, 2011 12:17 PM
  • With the right permissions, you can do everything within EMC and Powershell and not need to use ADUC.
    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:33 AM
    Thursday, April 7, 2011 1:13 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi

    You are new to Exchange 2010 so you maybe not used to Exchange 2010. You should also see the advantages when you find its disadvantage. As the below mentioned above, Exchange 2010 provides more high available, such as improved information worker access, increased the database maximum size, configuring outlook anywhere to provide external access to Exchange 2010 for your clients and so on.

    In particular, for Exchange Management Shell, once you are very familiar with it, you will feel it so convenient because you can do everything in it.

    For more information about Exchange 2010, you can refer to Microsoft official website: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb124558.aspx

    Hope it helps.

    Thanks


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Sophia Xu Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:33 AM
    Friday, April 8, 2011 3:36 AM
  • I also find it frustrating, create an object in AD in the desired OU then mail enable the object in the exchange EMC, when we could do it in one hit with the one wizard in 2k3

    I also find the reliance on powershell annoying rather than developing a fully fledged GUI it's a 1/2 attempt with alot missing from the GUI. Powershell is great but for us milti-skillers it slows us down as we can't live all day every day in exchange

     

    Friday, April 8, 2011 4:47 AM
  • I also find it frustrating, create an object in AD in the desired OU then mail enable the object in the exchange EMC, when we could do it in one hit with the one wizard in 2k3

    In EMC, when you create a new User Mailbox, you get the option of creating a new user, and specifying the location.  However I also was fustrated by using two tools for mail management in Exchange 2007 & 2010 until a course trainer explained it like this (paraphrased from his explanation to me):-

    "SQL management - do you use one tool for user management and SQL management?  SMS? SCCM?  SCOM?  etc etc.  Then why do you want one tool for user management and exchange management?"  The argument went on a little longer - but hopefully you get the point.

    Now, I would argue that email and user management are more closely related than the other products mentioned, but I also accept that design decisions to separate the tools for Exchange 2007 (and forward to 2010) made sense to me, as more features could be exposed through the GUI than probably would have been if bolted onto ADUC

     

    Friday, April 8, 2011 1:13 PM
  • It's pretty much deja vu to 20 years ago but with a heavy dose of irony.  "GUI is all nice and everything, but serious admins use the command shell!"
    Friday, April 8, 2011 3:01 PM