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use msiexec.exe to remove an application

    Question

  • I have 500+ Windows 7 systems that I need to remove Symantec VIP client from.

    Looking in the registry on several systems I am unable to locate the GUID for the application, however each system has an MSI package under C:\Windows\Installer\RANDOM.MSI which can be called with an /x parameter for removal.

    Manual execution of msiexec.exe  /qn /x C:\Windows\Installer\41f43.msi as administrator brings up a Prompt where you have to supply a Yes or No answer for removal of user profile (inside the application)

    Is there a way to supply Yes / No answer with msiexec.exe ?

    Is there a way to figure out the name of the msi file on each machine or should I find MSIs for all versions of the app and place them on the server so I can run

    msiexec.exe  /qn /x \\server\removesoftware\v1.msi

    msiexec.exe  /qn /x \\server\removesoftware\v2.msi

    msiexec.exe  /qn /x \\server\removesoftware\v3.msi


    Thanks

    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 7:33 PM

Answers

  • > Manual execution of msiexec.exe  /qn /x C:\Windows\Installer\41f43.msi
    > as administrator brings up a Prompt where you have to supply a Yes or No
    > answer for removal of user profile (inside the application)
     
    As Don mentioned: Depends on how the MSI is crafted. There's no
    "standard" way to suppress individual popups in a MSI, especially for
    custom actions.
     
    > Is there a way to figure out the name of the msi file on each machine or
    > should I find MSIs for all versions of the app and place them on the
    > server so I can run
     
    Regedit:
    HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Installer\UserData\S-1-5-18\Products\<product
    code - obfuscated>\InstallProperties: LocalPackage contains the cached
    MSI file name.
     
    The <product code - obfuscated> is the original MSI product code - first
    part in reverse nibble order, second and third part in reverse nibble
    order, fourth and fifth part in bytewise reverse nibble order.
     
    Example:
     
    Product code {14E2CE00-465F-4AD2-8365-A4F543E40F90}
     
    First part: 14E2CE00 - reverse nibble: 00EC2E41
    Second part: 465F - reverse nibble: F564
    Third part: 4AD2 - reverse nibble: 2DA4
    Fourth part: 8365 - bytewise reverse nibble: 3856
    Fifth part: A4F543E40F90 - bytewise reverse nibble: 4A5F344EF009
     
    Resulting registry key for <product code - obfuscated>:
    00EC2E41F5642DA438564A5F344EF009
     
    Weird, but true :)
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 7:54 AM
  • It seems to be a custom action (or similar), contained within the VIP msifile, to prompt if you want to keep or remove userdate (credentials).

    You may need to examine the documentation for this product, or contact the vendor, or use the vendor forums, to get this help.

    https://knowledge.verisign.com/support/ua-support/index.html


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)


    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 8:21 PM
  • > this is helpful info, but since there is no "easy" way to suppress the
    > prompt I don't think I can automate the removal using msiexec.exe
     
    You could edit the MSI - but if the prompt results from a custom action
    in a DLL, and that action does important things afterwards, you are
    right to go with reg keys and that stuff :)
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Friday, March 13, 2015 8:19 AM

All replies

  • It seems to be a custom action (or similar), contained within the VIP msifile, to prompt if you want to keep or remove userdate (credentials).

    You may need to examine the documentation for this product, or contact the vendor, or use the vendor forums, to get this help.

    https://knowledge.verisign.com/support/ua-support/index.html


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)


    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 8:21 PM
  • > Manual execution of msiexec.exe  /qn /x C:\Windows\Installer\41f43.msi
    > as administrator brings up a Prompt where you have to supply a Yes or No
    > answer for removal of user profile (inside the application)
     
    As Don mentioned: Depends on how the MSI is crafted. There's no
    "standard" way to suppress individual popups in a MSI, especially for
    custom actions.
     
    > Is there a way to figure out the name of the msi file on each machine or
    > should I find MSIs for all versions of the app and place them on the
    > server so I can run
     
    Regedit:
    HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Installer\UserData\S-1-5-18\Products\<product
    code - obfuscated>\InstallProperties: LocalPackage contains the cached
    MSI file name.
     
    The <product code - obfuscated> is the original MSI product code - first
    part in reverse nibble order, second and third part in reverse nibble
    order, fourth and fifth part in bytewise reverse nibble order.
     
    Example:
     
    Product code {14E2CE00-465F-4AD2-8365-A4F543E40F90}
     
    First part: 14E2CE00 - reverse nibble: 00EC2E41
    Second part: 465F - reverse nibble: F564
    Third part: 4AD2 - reverse nibble: 2DA4
    Fourth part: 8365 - bytewise reverse nibble: 3856
    Fifth part: A4F543E40F90 - bytewise reverse nibble: 4A5F344EF009
     
    Resulting registry key for <product code - obfuscated>:
    00EC2E41F5642DA438564A5F344EF009
     
    Weird, but true :)
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 7:54 AM
  • Martin,

    this is helpful info, but since there is no "easy" way to suppress the prompt I don't think I can automate the removal using msiexec.exe . Will look in to removing Reg keys and stopping services via GPO

    Thanks

    Thursday, March 12, 2015 7:04 PM
  • > this is helpful info, but since there is no "easy" way to suppress the
    > prompt I don't think I can automate the removal using msiexec.exe
     
    You could edit the MSI - but if the prompt results from a custom action
    in a DLL, and that action does important things afterwards, you are
    right to go with reg keys and that stuff :)
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Friday, March 13, 2015 8:19 AM
  • Hi,

    It's been a while. How is it going? If you need further help regarding the question, please don't hesitate to let us know.

    Best regards,
    Frank Shen


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Friday, March 20, 2015 7:31 AM
    Moderator