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Using get-acl to view the Advanced Permissions of as folder RRS feed

  • Question

  • When I run Get-ACL for a folder I get a report like the one below

    We use advanced permissions with specific premissions to each user however I am unable to find a way to view the advanced permissions. 

    Is there any suggestions to accomplishing this?

    Thank you

    AccessToString   : domain\user1 Allow  FullControl
                              domain\user1 Allow  DeleteSubdirectoriesAndFiles, Write, ReadAndExecute, Synchronize
                              domain\user2 Allow  DeleteSubdirectoriesAndFiles, Modify, Synchronize
                              domain\user2 Allow  DeleteSubdirectoriesAndFiles, Write, ReadAndExecute, Synchronize
                              domain\user3 Admins Allow  FullControl
                              domain\user4 ReadOnly Allow  ReadAndExecute, Synchronize
                              domain\user4 ReadWrite Allow  DeleteSubdirectoriesAndFiles, Modify, ChangePermissions, Synchronize
                              domain\user5 Allow  FullControl


    R White

    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 5:07 PM

Answers

  • You're looking for the 'Access' property, which is a collection of ACE objects that make up the Discretionary ACL (the 'Audit' property contains the System ACL ACEs). Each of the 'Access' ACE objects contain the following properties:

    • AccessControlType - Allow or Deny
    • IdentityReference - The principal that the ACE applies to
    • FileSystemRights - The rights that are granted or denied (depending on the AccessControlType). Most of the time this is translated to a string representation since it's using a flags enumeration.
    • IsInherited
    • InheritanceFlags - Controls what types of child objects that the ACE applies to. If ContainerInherit is present, the ACE will apply to subfolders. If ObjectInherit is present, the ACE will apply to any child files.
    • PropagationFlags - Controls propagation of the ACE. If InheritOnly is present, the ACE will not apply to the folder that the ACE belongs to. If NoPropagateInherit is present, the ACE will only apply to direct children, i.e., it would apply to subfolders, but not their subfolders or files.

    Here are some examples:

    Get-Acl C:\folder | select Path -ExpandProperty Access
    
    dir C:\folder | Get-Acl | select Path -ExpandProperty Access
    
    dir C:\folder | 
        ForEach-Object { $_ | Get-Acl } | # Get-Acl throws terminating errors, so this is a quick way to stop that
        select @{Label="Path"; Expression = { Convert-Path $_.Path }} -ExpandProperty Access |
        Format-Table
    

    You're not necessarily going to get the same view from Get-Acl that the ACL Editor GUI will show you. Get-Acl is going to give you something that is much closer to the raw security descriptor that belongs to the file/folder, while the GUI does some nice things for you like translating generic rights and merging ACEs. 

    If you're looking for something that more closely resembles the GUI, you can try the Get-AccessControlEntry from the PowerShell Access Control Module. It's very useful if you can get past the speed (it's really slow compared to Get-Acl when you run it against hundreds or thousands of objects). I'm pretty close to having a preview of version 4.0, which is faster than using Get-Acl, so keep an eye on the gallery page if you find version 3.0 useful.

    • Proposed as answer by jrv Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:33 PM
    • Marked as answer by tnetplus Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:40 PM
    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:30 PM

All replies

  • THere is no such thing as advanced permissions.  Do you mean "Special Permissions"?  THey are displayed in your example. 

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 5:36 PM
  • THere is no such thing as advanced permissions.  Do you mean "Special Permissions"?  THey are displayed in your example. 

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Thanks for the response.   I do not see how the special permissions are displayed.

    For example this is how thee permissions are displayed in Get-Acl 

    domain\user4  Allow  ReadAndExecute, Synchronize

    However is does not display the special permissions granted or if it is applied to just this folder or the folder and sub folders. Am i just reading this wrong?   

    If i go to the advanced permissionsfor that folder and look at that user i see the below info.  Most users are set twice.  One has one set of special permissionsto the folder only and another set of special permissionsto the folder and sub folders.   

    Thanks again  


    R White

    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 6:06 PM
  • You're looking for the 'Access' property, which is a collection of ACE objects that make up the Discretionary ACL (the 'Audit' property contains the System ACL ACEs). Each of the 'Access' ACE objects contain the following properties:

    • AccessControlType - Allow or Deny
    • IdentityReference - The principal that the ACE applies to
    • FileSystemRights - The rights that are granted or denied (depending on the AccessControlType). Most of the time this is translated to a string representation since it's using a flags enumeration.
    • IsInherited
    • InheritanceFlags - Controls what types of child objects that the ACE applies to. If ContainerInherit is present, the ACE will apply to subfolders. If ObjectInherit is present, the ACE will apply to any child files.
    • PropagationFlags - Controls propagation of the ACE. If InheritOnly is present, the ACE will not apply to the folder that the ACE belongs to. If NoPropagateInherit is present, the ACE will only apply to direct children, i.e., it would apply to subfolders, but not their subfolders or files.

    Here are some examples:

    Get-Acl C:\folder | select Path -ExpandProperty Access
    
    dir C:\folder | Get-Acl | select Path -ExpandProperty Access
    
    dir C:\folder | 
        ForEach-Object { $_ | Get-Acl } | # Get-Acl throws terminating errors, so this is a quick way to stop that
        select @{Label="Path"; Expression = { Convert-Path $_.Path }} -ExpandProperty Access |
        Format-Table
    

    You're not necessarily going to get the same view from Get-Acl that the ACL Editor GUI will show you. Get-Acl is going to give you something that is much closer to the raw security descriptor that belongs to the file/folder, while the GUI does some nice things for you like translating generic rights and merging ACEs. 

    If you're looking for something that more closely resembles the GUI, you can try the Get-AccessControlEntry from the PowerShell Access Control Module. It's very useful if you can get past the speed (it's really slow compared to Get-Acl when you run it against hundreds or thousands of objects). I'm pretty close to having a preview of version 4.0, which is faster than using Get-Acl, so keep an eye on the gallery page if you find version 3.0 useful.

    • Proposed as answer by jrv Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:33 PM
    • Marked as answer by tnetplus Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:40 PM
    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:30 PM
  • Rohn - excellent explanation.  Even I learned something.  That always gets my attention.

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:34 PM
  • Rohn - excellent explanation.  Even I learned something.  That always gets my attention.

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Thanks, jrv!
    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:49 PM
  • Rohn - excellent explanation.  Even I learned something.  That always gets my attention.


    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Thanks, jrv!

    Hey! Good work deserves maximum applause. 

    Be well and continue having fun.


    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:54 PM
  • So sorry.  I was on my phone and could not type on the forum.    Thanks!

    That is great!


    R White

    Wednesday, December 31, 2014 12:01 AM