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Internet Explorer 11 and failure on related components RRS feed

  • Question

  • Firstly, I want to say hi to everyone in here and make clear that I've only posted here because I'm not sure what forum would be the right one. So, if it's posted in the wrong place, I'm really sorry.

    Well, back to the problem, it's quite simple: IE11 opens and crashes. It hangs and I must close it via Process Explorer or TaskMgr. Some other programs that seems to rely upon IE's Trident engine would fail, as well, like Skype and Desktop Gadgets.

    To check if it's really IE-engine problem, I've installed WLM through reviver, and it crashes, as well. An enterprise P2P application used by a esporadic client that I work for (and uses IE to render some HTML portions) opens, then freezes when loading HTML (like IE does).

    In fact, IE failure, itself, won't bother me, because I'm not using IE for years. But looks like it's base libs are preventing it's dependant apps to work.

    Well, I've been using Windows since Win95, and used Linux for at least two years, so I'm crawling Google for days (at least four, I'd say) and I've already tried all basic measures sugested.

    That problem arose after a failed WU process. In a fresh Win7 install, I let it install all those 100+ updates. However, it fails. And when I'm back to Windows, it gives me the chance to retry failed updates. So it's what I did. Some of them fail to instal... I do not remember exactly if IE were among then, but it failed with 9C48 code whenever I tried to install it. But, one of these trials gave me a "Missing winning component key" failure (pointed by CBS.log and CheckSur.log) that made me pull all hair out.

    However, some Google and RegEdit-hours later, I've figured out and corrected WU problem. Then IE, that were working back then, stopped to run correctly.

    It's hard to list all the things I've tried. But I've sure tried to remove it through Windows Features, and it failed. Tried to manual install the last version and it said I've already had it. So, I tried this:

    FORFILES /P %WINDIR%\servicing\Packages /M Microsoft-Windows-InternetExplorer-*11.*.mum /c "cmd /c echo Uninstalling package @fname && start /w pkgmgr /up:@fname /quiet /norestart

    It removed some packages, made Windows think that it's running IE 8 (as it's listed at Windows Features, now) and left me with a buggy IE 11 that still crashing and cannot be uninstalled for nothing in this world. Manual install still telling me that I've already have the last version (IE 11.0.9600.17496, according to the main binary props).

    I don't know what to do, because I'm not really willing to re-install entire Windows. I have my programs, configs and it's running on my last possible activation. All arround, they keeping telling me to do the basic troubleshooting and then vanishes.

    I'm somewhat experienced user, but Windows, as a proprietary system, lacks some documentation on dirty odds of CBS and so. All I can do is trial and error. If it's lacking some info (like logs, events, etc.), I'll be glad to upload it to DropBox and send it in for proper exam.

    Also, I'm sorry for my terrible English, I'm lacking some grammar skills that I'm still learning, slowly.

    Thanks,
    T. R. P.

    Tuesday, January 20, 2015 2:34 AM

Answers

  • I managed to correct myself the problem... It was tough, however I had a wrong picture of the problem the entire time. What happened, I think, is that it missed some important libraries installed by the (in)famous "death update" (KB2670838). An article (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2847882) told me to install it (and some others). With an exception of KB2729094 and the death update itself, all others were already installed.

    I was feared that it would harm my Windows installation. But it didn't, at all. And everything works fine, now.

    Some MVP's told me to restore my system. I think that there's little effort on really helping users. Some Google-hours later, I've figured out how to fix it without having to restore my entire system to fresh system registry. MS should, as well, provide better details on what depends upon what. It took me days to find that article. I don't know, but something on the Microsoft's way of troubleshooting seems pretty odd to me. In my Linux times, there were only a few errors that I could not fix by simple Googling. The most common of them provided good insights on what caused the problem... Windows, however, puts any advanced user in a trial and error trap.

    I'm not an Windows hater: in fact, I've always used it, spent years using the ultra-reliable Windows Server 2003, enjoyed Windows NT stability. However, that odd thing about fixing deep system problems is something that always grinds my gears in an Windows system. Perhaps it's a good time for Microsoft to look at that and make the system architecture more simple, modular and less based on colapsing DLL's.

    Well, it's only my 50 cents. The problem is now solved.
    • Marked as answer by prppedro Sunday, February 8, 2015 10:33 PM
    Sunday, February 8, 2015 10:33 PM

All replies


  • Hello T. R. P.,

    You have tried the command “FORFILES /P %WINDIR%\servicing\Packages….” to remove Internet Explorer 11 packages.

    As you receive the error message about you have already installed the Internet Explorer 11, I think some of the package about Internet Explorer are not removed completely.

    Please run the command to Dism /online /Get-Packages | findstr InternetExplorer to find out the package related to Internet Explorer 11.
    Run the command Dism /online /Remove-package /packagename: <package full name> to remove the packages.
    And then try to install Internet Explorer 11 again.

    If the issue still exists, please share us the CBS.log for analyzation.

    Best regards,
    Fangzhou CHEN


    Fangzhou CHEN
    TechNet Community Support

    • Proposed as answer by Karen Hu Tuesday, January 27, 2015 2:46 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by prppedro Thursday, February 5, 2015 4:42 AM
    Friday, January 23, 2015 10:41 AM
  • Hi, Fangzhou.

    Thanks for the reply and a direct suggestion on what to do. I'm a bit late answering because I was travelling. I did the command when I read it for the first time, on the hotel. Now, back to my home, tried it again to confirm. The first command returns no entries.

    I don't know which CBS.log to send, because there are a plenty of them. But I got everything in CBS folder inside a ZIP file and uploaded it to Dropbox. I'd glad to share other files, if needed.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/f1tyxfie3ejmtf9/CBS_Fangzhou.zip?dl=0

    Thanks,
    -t.r.p.

    Sunday, February 1, 2015 2:20 AM
  • I managed to correct myself the problem... It was tough, however I had a wrong picture of the problem the entire time. What happened, I think, is that it missed some important libraries installed by the (in)famous "death update" (KB2670838). An article (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2847882) told me to install it (and some others). With an exception of KB2729094 and the death update itself, all others were already installed.

    I was feared that it would harm my Windows installation. But it didn't, at all. And everything works fine, now.

    Some MVP's told me to restore my system. I think that there's little effort on really helping users. Some Google-hours later, I've figured out how to fix it without having to restore my entire system to fresh system registry. MS should, as well, provide better details on what depends upon what. It took me days to find that article. I don't know, but something on the Microsoft's way of troubleshooting seems pretty odd to me. In my Linux times, there were only a few errors that I could not fix by simple Googling. The most common of them provided good insights on what caused the problem... Windows, however, puts any advanced user in a trial and error trap.

    I'm not an Windows hater: in fact, I've always used it, spent years using the ultra-reliable Windows Server 2003, enjoyed Windows NT stability. However, that odd thing about fixing deep system problems is something that always grinds my gears in an Windows system. Perhaps it's a good time for Microsoft to look at that and make the system architecture more simple, modular and less based on colapsing DLL's.

    Well, it's only my 50 cents. The problem is now solved.
    • Marked as answer by prppedro Sunday, February 8, 2015 10:33 PM
    Sunday, February 8, 2015 10:33 PM