none
MS Project Missing Fields like Expected Work! RRS feed

  • Question

  • While Planning, Work is a very important variable, MS Project has Work and Actual Work, however it misses a field with the Expected Work based on the Status Date. I did a formula in Duration1 Custom Field that solves the issue in the Gantt Chart, however you can't transpose these Custom Fields to Resources Sheet! Here is the Formula for Expected Work in Gantt Chart:

    • IIf([Status Date]<[Start];0;IIf([Status Date]>[Finish];[Work];([Status Date]-[Start])/([Finish]-[Start])*[Work]))

    With the Field Expected Work incorporated in MS Project it would be possible to identify the resources with more Delayed Work accordingly to the Status Date...

    Why after so many versions MS Project still misses some very useful Fields?


    Sunday, June 25, 2017 6:40 PM

All replies

  • Rui --

    Before you begin entering progress in your schedule, you need to save a Baseline for your project.  By doing this, Microsoft Project will capture the planned Work for every task, resource, and assignment in the schedule, along with the timephased Work as well.  When you enter or update actual progress in your schedule and then specify the Status Date for your project, the software will do a "behind the scenes" calculation of the expected Actual Work up to the Status Date.  The software will use this information to calculate Earned Value for your project and the tasks in the project.  Unfortunately, there is no "Expected Work" field like you are seeking.  It just is not there, so we live with it.  Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]

    Monday, June 26, 2017 12:42 AM
    Moderator
  • In the current plan, for a task and a resource there is only actual work and remaining work, and actual + remaining = work , ie total work.

    In the baseline there is baseline work, which is the total work when the baseline was set. I think this is what you are looking for.

    Your formula? I wouldn't pursue it.

    ([Status Date]-[Start])/([Finish]-[Start]) is really the % complete if all of the duration between actual start and status date is actual duration. It does not account for different amounts of work on the various days.

    Monday, June 26, 2017 5:00 AM