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Windows 7 and the battery error "consider replacing your battery" (Part 11) RRS feed

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  • Vegan Fanatic. I have watched you post for months now, I can tell that you either work for M$ or follow their code of conduct because your posts are meaningless! Random users give better hints than you do and no one cares that you've already 'told world+dog'. Stop shelling out rhetoric please, this place is for people who want to see a successful Win7 install, obviously reverting isn't our foremost obliged option. You are incorrect on the notorious nature of laptop components as they are far more standardized than you think.

     

    People who read this.....don't pay attention to the guy above as he will do nothing but echo phrases that were originally heard months ago. Your best bet is in the people who have this problem who are actively searching for a solution. In plain English: Vegan=useless, Microsoft=pathetic. Stop commenting please, especially when I'm trying to enjoy a juicy quarter pounder

    Monday, December 20, 2010 1:06 PM
  • We have an HP G61-320CA that is just over 1 year old.  In the last few weeks we started noticed battery warning messages in Win7 and also during bootup (a BIOS-level warning).  This sounds like a large scale problem (no, I haven't read all 11 pages of this thread yet).  Hopefully, there is a sufficient case for a class action as I would be content to have the root cause fixed and my dead battery replaced.  Not sure if I would qualify to be a rep plaintiff but I can certainly provide the purchase and usage history.

    Brad

    Thursday, December 23, 2010 6:47 AM
  • Unfortunately, I have the same problem on an ASUS Eee PC 1015PEM that's only 10 days old.  

    None of the solutions proposed here work for me.

    Saturday, December 25, 2010 3:39 PM
  • I have an ASUS Eee PC 1000HE that is 1 year old running Windows 7 for almost 1 year and have never seen any warning that my battery has a problem.

    I also have a Dell Inspiron 1501 that is over 3-1/2 years old with original battery running Win 7 x64 for almost 1 year and have never seen a battery warning on it either.

    So, I am not convinced the battery warning is a universal problem in Windows 7.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    Saturday, December 25, 2010 5:35 PM
  • I have an HP G60 laptop and have been using Win 7 for almost a year now. But the same problem have suddenly appearing and my batter life is redues to jsut 2-3 minutes only and system shut down suddenly. Though my battery shows Fully Charged 100%.

    I am not sure if it's my battery problem or it's due to Win 7.

    Sunday, December 26, 2010 6:42 PM
  • OK...listen up people, I've made a video on Youtube describing how this, in no way, can be a software issue. My example is shown by how my manufacture, Dell, has made a laptop that has a faulty charging supply. Every now and then I can get the battery to charge by playing with the AC adapter.  Yes, I've come across vids of people reinstalling drivers and it TEMPORARILY fixing the issue, but have yet to come across someone with hard evidence of this being a software issue. Watch my video and comment. ENJOY! I honestly hope this helps you guys.

     

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=RllAMhVPJwQ

     

     

    Monday, December 27, 2010 4:29 AM
  • Lots of manufacturers use shoddy power supplies, good ones cost big $

    eBay has lots of universal power supplies for notebooks, cheap

     


    Elected! Your votes and support have got me my 2010 MVP!

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Hardcore Games | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews


    I'd say that single statement you just made should be labeled as the answer and this topic should be closed lol.
    Monday, December 27, 2010 5:08 AM
  • can someone confirm that this is also experienced in a Windows7 32bit OS?

    I've been following these threads for more than a year now, and I guess I will finally give up and buy a new battery for my Acer Aspire 6920, which at the time of upgrade to Windows 7 64 bit was almost like new. Hard to believe that the battery became bad when I put Windows 7 on it.

     

    • Proposed as answer by Supermaco Wednesday, February 10, 2016 6:57 AM
    Tuesday, December 28, 2010 2:22 PM
  • I have a 17 month old HP notebook.  I had NO battery issues until I installed Windows 7.  The battery will no longer hold a charge and I have the dreaded "Consider replacing your battery" message and the highly annoying red X.  I have tried the BIOS change recommendations, etc. on the previous threads.

    I refuse to believe that it's just a coincidence that my battery issues started immediately after installing Win7. 

    If anyone is collecting contact information for a possible class action suit, please add me to the list.

     

    Wednesday, December 29, 2010 2:08 AM
  • can someone confirm that this is also experienced in a Windows7 32bit OS?

    I've been following these threads for more than a year now, and I guess I will finally give up and buy a new battery for my Acer Aspire 6920, which at the time of upgrade to Windows 7 64 bit was almost like new. Hard to believe that the battery became bad when I put Windows 7 on it.

     


    the vid i put on youtube was of me using the Windows 7 32-bit OS. so yes it happens on that one as well.

     

    @ToniTX, mine actually started doing this to me when I had Vista. If you search Google for this same problem on the Vista platform, you'll see that people are having the same issue. My brother's laptop didn't start doing it again until 3 months after having Windows 7. It's just a "coincidence" that yours occurred after installing Windows 7. I actually did find a cure for mine, which included disassembling my entire laptop down to the mobo and soldering a contact for the AC adapter port. All is well now and haven't had problems since. I still have yet to see solid proof of this being a software issue lol...

    Wednesday, December 29, 2010 2:27 AM
  • I have been using Windows 7 on my HP Pavilion DV4 laptop since it came out. Hp replaced me one battery and now as my warranty is over I have purchased a by myself. The problems on the batteries as same; battery life is very low, Windows 7 warns me "consider replacing your battery" , and the PC shut downs all of a sudden.

    This problem is clearly Windows 7 bug as other PCs with XP or Vista never had such kind of problem for batteries less than a year old. The first battery died after working 11 months. My second dead battery only lasted 5 months or less.

    When I took the battery to Hp service center, they checked the battery with different PC with Vista and when they checked the battery health With HP battery health check, it also says the battery is dead. So it is not just GUI error but Windows 7 has eaten the battery very badly.

    What I feel the real cause of the problem is the power settings and plans which seem more advanced than previous OS but has led to battery death. I think a simple trial and error could help identify what specific setting is causing the problem, which shouldn't have taken a year to solve for Microsoft.

     

    Monday, January 3, 2011 5:07 AM
  • I suggest selecting the power options and using one set aggressively for portability.

    Control Panel\System and Security\Power Options

     

     


    Elected! Your votes and support have got me my 2010 MVP!

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Hardcore Games | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews


    Do you think there is anyone who use battery with high performance? I think most users prefer power saver on battery and me too. So you are wrong! The cause of this BUG is not because we/I used the battery aggressively.
    Monday, January 3, 2011 5:26 AM
  • My acer laptop always has the error, and it shuts too down while Im playing one of my download games. Is there a solution? 
    Wednesday, January 5, 2011 9:37 AM
  • Its not that the battery became bad when you installed Windows 7, its just Windows 7 is the first Windows OS to include this notification.
    Matthew Arkin - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied
    Wednesday, January 5, 2011 11:50 PM
  • Its not that the battery became bad when you installed Windows 7, its just Windows 7 is the first Windows OS to include this notification.

    From : http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2010/02/08/windows-7-battery-notification-messages.aspx

    "This degradation translates into less battery life for the user over the life of the battery in the PC.  Ultimately, batteries must be replaced to restore an acceptable battery life.  A quick check of mainstream laptops will show that batteries usually have a warranty of 12 months, which is about the length of time when statistically we expect to see noticeable degradation (meaning that you start to notice the need to charge more frequently)"


    Matthew Arkin - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied
    Wednesday, January 5, 2011 11:52 PM
  • Its not that the battery became bad when you installed Windows 7, its just Windows 7 is the first Windows OS to include this notification.

    From : http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2010/02/08/windows-7-battery-notification-messages.aspx

    "This degradation translates into less battery life for the user over the life of the battery in the PC.  Ultimately, batteries must be replaced to restore an acceptable battery life.  A quick check of mainstream laptops will show that batteries usually have a warranty of 12 months, which is about the length of time when statistically we expect to see noticeable degradation (meaning that you start to notice the need to charge more frequently)"


    Matthew Arkin - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied
    I get that, but i changed OS from Vista to windows 7 yesterday. When i was running on Vista i could go without the charger for at least 1hour, with windows 7 i can go  20 min or less. Hard to belive my battery went that bad over a couple of hours?....
    Thursday, January 6, 2011 11:53 AM
  • Still no solution from Microsoft? That's really pathetic...
    Saturday, January 8, 2011 11:03 PM
  • I bought Acer 4736 installed Windows 7 about three weeks. When I checked my battery : 10% wear. So I decided installed Vista, after 1 year, my battery is still  10% wear. Vista maybe slower than Windows 7 but my  battery is safe when using it. I will not use Windows 7 until it was fixed.
    Sunday, January 9, 2011 8:09 AM
  • well guys i think that microsoft didn't figure out yet the problem it made to peoples' laptops and its blaming the manufacturers i have the same issue on my HP probook i don't think that all these brands have the same problem the right thing is that Microsoft has the problem and a fix is recommended ,....
    Thursday, January 13, 2011 2:14 AM
  • As for me I'm using lenovo U350 running Win7 32b. I start getting the msg "Consider Replacing Your battery" suddenly 1 day after return home from my trips to India. I thought "Could it be caused by unstable power supply at the hotel" or "power surge happens when I didn"t use proper power converter when I was in the delhi airport" or ....But I google and found this thread. I follow step by step suggestion post by Damian18 (Wednesday, April 28, 2010 2:04 PM ) ...And walla...my battery are good and healthy... no more annoying red X...

    So now did the error msg caused by false battery reports or FALSE Win7 reports or false BIOS reports....

    Nevetheless my report is TRUE..

    Peace...


    Friday, January 14, 2011 4:24 AM
  •     Vegan Fanatic. I have watched you post for months now, I can tell that you either work for M$ or follow their code of conduct because your posts are meaningless! Random users give better hints than you do and no one cares that you've already 'told world+dog'. Stop shelling out rhetoric please, this place is for people who want to see a successful Win7 install, obviously reverting isn't our foremost obliged option. You are incorrect on the notorious nature of laptop components as they are far more standardized than you think.


        People who read this.....don't pay attention to the guy above as he will do nothing but echo phrases that were originally heard months ago. Your best bet is in the people who have this problem who are actively searching for a solution. In plain English: Vegan=useless, Microsoft=pathetic. Stop commenting please, especially when I'm trying to enjoy a juicy quarter pounder

    Vegan is an MS employee, stooge or "volunteer". His posts offer nothing but a condescending tone to people in need of help. MS clearly doesn't give a ____ about this issue and is passing the buck. If you look at Vegan's posts over the many months, it's always the same mantra... "batteries don't last forever", "install the OS the notebook came with as the hardware is all unorthodox and not compatible", "update your bios", "contact the manufacturer". Seriously Vegan, pull your head out of the sand.

    Batteries don't die overnight going from 2 hours to usage to 20mins. And it doesn't happen 4 times in a row after buying a new battery each time either as some have done here to not only backup their complaints, but to show without a shadow of a doubt, there IS a problem. You know this, so don't be preaching and trying to influence people that this is considered normal. Obviously in MS's universe it is. But batteries, they do last when looked after and of the 6 laptops I've owned, all had years of reliable usage. The common element here isn't a particular motherboard, component, manufacturer... it's Windows 7. That is the cause, the originator and destroyer of peoples batteries.

    The fact you keep on like a broken record means your purpose here isn't to help, but to mislead and direct people away from the real reason Win 7 destroys batteries. What exactly are you an MVP of anyway? Deception, condescending and retardation? It's not old batteries, it's not crappy chargers, it's not old bios’, it's not having to deal with acpi issues, it's simply poor programming on MS's part. Admit it, or find another forum to mislead and deceive.


    Wednesday, January 19, 2011 2:46 AM
  • This is horrifying. My computer just started having this issue yesterday. I search the net and find this thread... a thread that has been goin on since JUNE 2009!!!! And still no solution. This is infinite levels of screwed up.
    Thursday, January 20, 2011 4:06 PM
  • We have an HP computer doing the same thing and never thought it was a Windows issue.  After a year I bought a new battery and within a month we were having the same issue again.  Now the computer won't even charge the battery.

    Batteries wear out but I'm sorry, they don't wear out that fast.  This makes so much sense.  I have another HP laptop running XP.  The battery will slowly wear down, but never suddenly like the other computer.

    Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:29 PM
  • Hello guys, i have a similar problem with Compal HL 90.

    After upgrading from Windows Vista Home premium to W7 unltimate my battery life went down from 5 hours to 5-10 minutes.

    I've tryed other battery but it does the same thing even tryed my battery in another laptop and it works fine, btw powercfg utility shows full capacity on last recharge (79920 / 79920 ).  I have also instaled "smart battery" software which should help but it doesnt battery still falls down from 99% to 7% in 5 to 10 minutes.

     

    Im not sure if its just W7 problem or more like problem with compatibility, but still if anyone could help i would be really grateful.

    Monday, January 24, 2011 10:07 AM
  • My Dell Vostro 1310 laptop showed me this message 2 days ago. It is a almost 2 years old laptop.

    Is there any software that i can measure my battery?

     

    I´m using Original Windows 7 Ultimate since i bought it.

    Thursday, February 3, 2011 12:33 PM
  • I have been coming back to this thread for a year now. In that time I went from vista to windows 7 and back to vista on my HP Pavillion dv9000.
    Going from around 1-2 hour charging time to 20-30 min charge, and now that I am using vista again it has stayed that way. And seeing as many people bought new batteries and again the same thing happened in less than a month. It is clear to me that either computer manufacturers like HP or Dell have some issues in the hardware department or that Microsoft has some software issues with windows 7. In either case none of these companies will help you. Therefore, I say stick with the OS that works with your laptop best or install windows 7 knowing that your battery will die very soon. I'm done checking back to this tread. Peace.
    Tuesday, February 8, 2011 3:56 PM
  • I suddenly started getting the dreaded "Replace battery" message. I had recently upgraded my HP dv5t from Vista to Windows 7. I am positive that the problem has to do with Windows 7 and not with the battery.

    The reason I think so is because:

    When I got the message, my battery was not charging about 38%. Then as someone has suggested, I uninstalled "ACPI Compliant Control Method", and reinstalled it. Then the battery charged to 60% and stopped. Which means, this is a software issue, or Windows 7 screwed up the battery somehow.

     

    Friday, February 11, 2011 2:41 PM
  • add me to the list also.  my battery was just fine on xp now says 100% when fully charged but last just 20 minutes before shutting off.  thanks windows 7, now if i want to save my laptop i have to buy a new battery and do a clean install back to xp.  is this some kind of conspiracy to trash the older laptops and make people buy new ones?  you can be sure im not letting anybody i know upgrade to windows 7.
    Sunday, February 13, 2011 8:42 PM
  • I have just started receiving this error on my desktop. As far as I know, I don't have a battery. It is plugged into an outlet. Where is there a battery? This makes me think that it must indeed be a problem in Windows 7. The error said my battery was reaching a critical level, and that I should consider replacing it.

     

    Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:53 PM
  • De boa pessoal  comprei um I-buster hbnb-1401 e veio o win7 instalado e  com ele nao consigo mais de 1 hora de bateria no modo economia

    Voltei meu velho Xp service pack2 de guerra e a bateria ta durando 1 hora e 45 em media trabalhando no maximo e com varios aplicativos incluindo gravacao de dvd de filme no totl video convert 

    DEFINITIVAMENTE O WIN7 NAO USA DURACELL KKKKKKKKK ELE DEVE USAR AS AMARELINHAS KKKKKKKKKKKKK

    Sunday, February 20, 2011 12:52 AM
  • I think this is not the only case I have. I had vista Home premium shipped with my Acer laptop. I upgraded to Windows 7. It went good for some time. But one day when I was working on battery power, it shut down after completely being discharged. I plugged in with power cord and upon restart I saw this red X on my battery icon stating the same thing. I googled up and one of the thread asked me to completely discharge the battery again and then fully recharge with one software. For my wonder, upon restarting after battery discharged, the red X along with the message were gone.

    Now after sometime it reappeared, I tried the old trick again but nothing happened. Although the battery still gives me more than an hour for normal work but this red X is there.

     

    Sunday, February 20, 2011 11:08 AM
  • Hey folks, finally some good news. I troubleshooted yesterday and the red X along with the message is gone. Now the battery is showing time. Please go through the following link and do exactly as told. http://www.rm.com/Support/TechnicalArticle.asp?cref=TEC401640 But remind you one thing, is always use hybernation/sleep for low battery action. Also it will be better if you keep the low battery level at 10% or little more.
    • Proposed as answer by Tramgamer Sunday, February 27, 2011 8:28 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Tramgamer Sunday, February 27, 2011 8:29 AM
    Monday, February 21, 2011 10:35 AM
  • Since about 1 year I have my 3 years old Asus FL5 running on Win 7. After just 1 day I got the red X.  I disabled ACPI.

    Restart without battery. Put battery back, and enabled ACPI, red X was gone. Since that time never had a red X problem.

    Yesterday I put on my notebook, and it instantly closed down.

    Restarted with AC connected and there was the red X again.

    Deconnected the power and it was showing 90% loaded and only 4 minutes of use.

    Shit. Now I did the same as 1 year ago. And indeed the red X was gone and the battery lasted about the normal 1.5 hour.

     

    Sunday, February 27, 2011 8:42 AM
  • i installed windows 7 on my acer travelmate 6291 laptop about a year ago. coincidence or not, just a few days after, my battery (6 cell) died! though it was already a 2yr old laptop, i don't think my battery will just die all of a sudden (literrally in just a few days!). when it was still on vista, i was getting an hour on balanced power and about 45 minutes on high performance. i used it for a few more days and i was about to purchase a new battery when i saw some threads about this issue online... so i had decided to reinstall the original OS using the recovery dvd's i have. battery was still dead for a few more days but to my surprise after a couple of days it was alive again!!! i was getting again an hour on balanced and 45 minutes on high performance. now, i installed ubuntu just a couple of days ago and somehow i didn't liked it so i went ahead reverted back to vista but i don't know if ubuntu messed up the OEM partitions or what not and now both the recovery partition and recovery dvd's won't load! i didnt erase the recovery partition when i installed and i tested both methods of recovery before (but this is another topic). but moving on, now i am torn if i am to install vista (RTM should work using my OEM keys on the bottom) or install windows 7 (retail) again and this time the one with sp1... tough decision for me as i don't want to kill my battery just yet again...
    Monday, February 28, 2011 7:21 PM
  • Folks,

    Microsoft has launched Service Pack 1 of Windows 7. Once you install it, it gives you the option to remove the red X and replacing battery message under the battery percentage.

     

    • Proposed as answer by munsif Tuesday, March 1, 2011 10:07 AM
    Tuesday, March 1, 2011 10:07 AM
  • Folks,

    Microsoft has launched Service Pack 1 of Windows 7. Once you install it, it gives you the option to remove the red X and replacing battery message under the battery percentage.

     

    WARNING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

     

    DO NOT INSTALL THE NEW UPDATE!! Service pack 1 is being uninstalled from my computer right now... it actually made the whole thing worse!!!!!  I have the battery problem and I listened to the post above.. I installed service pack 1.. Guess what.. My battery used to last 40 minutes with the previous problem.. now it lasts 7 minutes MAX!!

     

    Its a warning... Thats all im saying.. Yes The service pack fixes the stupid error about replacing the battery but!! your battery will drain down so fast its not worth it.. It charges from 0 to 100 in 3 minutes... and then goes down from 100% to 0 in 7 minutes! that is not what I call a fix microsoft.. Im uninstalling every single update. atm Will post back when done :(

    P.S. The same battery that drained from 100 to 0 in 7 minutes, was detected as 100% in my windows xp laptop and lasted 7 hours.. its a damn software problem that microsoft cant fix.. waw...


    Note To Developers:  The Battery drain issue does not start when the user installs windows 7.. I have tested this 9 times:

    Installed windows 7, no updates, disabled automatic updates - the battery is fine.. The second I re-enable automatic updates and install an update, the battery problem is back.. and if i install service pack 1.. good bye battery. 7 mins max on service pack 1.

     

     

    EDIT: I have just uninstalled every single update that windows 7 ever had.. Guess what! MY BATTER IS FIXED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  The only windows 7 update left on my computer right now is: KB976902... It drains a hell of a lot slower.. still gives the error BUT the battery life is a hell of a lot longer. Well to get rid of the error Im going to restore and see what happens. that way that one update will be gone and ill post back.

    Sunday, March 13, 2011 9:24 AM
  • Folks,

    Microsoft has launched Service Pack 1 of Windows 7. Once you install it, it gives you the option to remove the red X and replacing battery message under the battery percentage.

    To sum up here:
    Windows 7 Service Pack 1
    Reinstalling or disabling drivers for battery
    Changing power scheme
    Charging battery full before turning on computer

    DOES NOT fix this issue. Untill this issue is fixed i suggest all who still got a working laptop battery install Windows Xp and fully charge the battery. Everyone else who got a totally broken battery due to this error, like i do. Well bad luck for us as i can read from the EULA microsoft is not forced to take eny responsibility for broken hardware. they can support you in fixing the problem but they cannot give you a new battery.

    Friday, March 18, 2011 8:15 AM
  •  

    Hey everyone,

     

    I just got this issue a few weeks ago, I own a Toshiba Sattelite Pro A300 which has never failed on me in 2 years.

    So, I figured, battery must be dead - i would expect it after heavy usage over 2 years.

    Bought a brand new battery - a toshiba one for my machine - not a cheap knock off, or 'will fit x laptop' from ebay.

    So, I took out the old battery, put in the new one and powered up my machine.

     

    STILL getting the error message on the battery icon, somehow thinks it has charged upto 44% from 10% in about 2 minutes (this is not possible?). I would very much say this is a software issue, its as if Microsoft have just got poorly made battery monitoring, which appears to just lie to you and then blame your hardware when it cant work it out. This started happening around the 4th March (a windows update day according to my update history).

     

    There is no reason a brand new battery from the manufacturer should be 'dead' - does this not prove it is a Windows 7 issue?

     

    Uninstalling updates now to see if anything solves this - who knows maybe my last battery is perfectly fine? >_>



    Friday, March 18, 2011 7:05 PM
  • hp have hit back with this page which acknowledges the problem but does nothing to help

     

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?cc=uk&lc=en&docname=c01997964

    Saturday, March 19, 2011 8:43 PM
  • I too am suffering *suddenly* from this issue.  My HP Compaq Mini 311 was working without any issues - the battery lasted for 5 hours plus.  Then around 2 weeks ago it started to turn off after around 1 hour.  This does not seem like battery aging to me, it is far to abrupt a change in behaviour it seems to me.  I am running Windows 7, with Windows Update and I had updates applied at around that time. 

    Can there be a connection between the updates and the change in battery behaviour?

    Thursday, March 24, 2011 12:59 AM
  • hp have hit back with this page which acknowledges the problem but does nothing to help

     

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?cc=uk&lc=en&docname=c01997964

    The blinking x is a curse.

    HP dv2700 laptop. 6 cell battery. W7 Pro SP1 upgrade from XP with all SP. Battery without SP1 lasted 70 minutes +/-, with SP1 on high power 37 minutes; low power 54 minutes.

    Using the link above I downloaded the latest HP Support utility to run the "Battery Test". That said battery was good but the blinking x stayed on. Drained the battery, recharged by plugging in, drained the battery again, recharged, shut down and then removed the battery before starting up on the plug. Shut down, reattached the battery and the blinking x is gone. Well sort of... Did the drain down again and the x came back with "Battery Check" saying battery needs replacement. Repeated all of the steps of drain/charge/etc. and x is again gone and battery check reports battery is just fine. (!?). None of this happiness occured prior to SP1.

    Thursday, March 24, 2011 6:07 PM
  • Folks,

    Microsoft has launched Service Pack 1 of Windows 7. Once you install it, it gives you the option to remove the red X and replacing battery message under the battery percentage.

     

    WARNING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

     

    DO NOT INSTALL THE NEW UPDATE!! Service pack 1 is being uninstalled from my computer right now... it actually made the whole thing worse!!!!!  I have the battery problem and I listened to the post above.. I installed service pack 1.. Guess what.. My battery used to last 40 minutes with the previous problem.. now it lasts 7 minutes MAX!!

     

    Its a warning... Thats all im saying.. Yes The service pack fixes the stupid error about replacing the battery but!! your battery will drain down so fast its not worth it.. It charges from 0 to 100 in 3 minutes... and then goes down from 100% to 0 in 7 minutes! that is not what I call a fix microsoft.. Im uninstalling every single update. atm Will post back when done :(

    P.S. The same battery that drained from 100 to 0 in 7 minutes, was detected as 100% in my windows xp laptop and lasted 7 hours.. its a damn software problem that microsoft cant fix.. waw...


    Note To Developers:  The Battery drain issue does not start when the user installs windows 7.. I have tested this 9 times:

    Installed windows 7, no updates, disabled automatic updates - the battery is fine.. The second I re-enable automatic updates and install an update, the battery problem is back.. and if i install service pack 1.. good bye battery. 7 mins max on service pack 1.

     

     

    EDIT: I have just uninstalled every single update that windows 7 ever had.. Guess what! MY BATTER IS FIXED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  The only windows 7 update left on my computer right now is: KB976902... It drains a hell of a lot slower.. still gives the error BUT the battery life is a hell of a lot longer. Well to get rid of the error Im going to restore and see what happens. that way that one update will be gone and ill post back.

    Brandon, this in a way confirms my suspicion that the Win 7 battery drain is in fact not only known by Microsoft, but intended!!!! I suspect this was put in to thwart piracy. Thus if a system is not "Genuine" this little nasty will get to work. But the problem with this is, is that it's never foolproof and M$ are renowned for stuffing over legitimate customers. Thus not only would a pirated version do this, a legit one could as well because the system thinks it's pirated.

    Putting in time bombs like this isn't new to software design. I've seen it and even several months ago suggested this was such a thing.

    By uninstalling all the Windows Updates on your system it certainly makes things interesting. Just like XP had WGA where if you installed that particular update which was called something generic btw, so you'd never know, suddenly a pirated system would then be crippled and nag away constantly. Chances are M$ got a bit more creative and destructive with this way of thinking.

    Brandon, would you be willing to run the updates again, but update only one at a time? I know it'll take awhile, but maybe one a day or something. That way we might be able to narrow down just what update is at fault here. Then we can look at what the update does and hopefully learn more.

    Monday, March 28, 2011 1:33 AM
  • Well - I did have this problem, I thoguht it was to do with software, but I bought a replacement battery since my HP Battery Check software indicated that the battery could only hold 28% of the designed capacity.   I have just installed the new battery, and it is showing that it has 98% of the design capacity now. 

    So, maybe the battery failed abruptly - now I have it, I will use the HP Battry Check to check on it regularly.

    Sunday, April 3, 2011 1:46 PM
  • I have the same problem here. Have had a several times. I used the command powercfg -energy, when I have the problem the programm tells me the follwoing about the battery: 

    Battery:Battery Information

    Battery ID ASUSTekG73--52
    Manufacturer ASUSTek
    Serial Number  
    Chemistry LIon
    Long Term 1
    Design Capacity 78000
    Last Full Charge 23700

     

    I solved it several times by shutting down the laptop, remove the battery, press down de power button for 30 seconds, place external power on it, boot, shutdown again, place battery, load battery to 100%, and the boot again. The powercfg programm says then Last Full Charge 74000. 
    I have done this 4 times in the last half year. But now it does not work anymore. What is really going on?
    Thx,
    Marc 

     

    Thursday, May 5, 2011 7:38 AM
  • I have Dell Vostro 1520 and I am facing this issue for quite a while now. I tried once draining the battery and then restarting the system. It worked once but strangely after next shutdown the obnoxious message is now appearing again.

    This is what I got after running some cmd command found on i'net:

    Battery:Last Full Charge (%)
    The battery stored less than 40% of the Designed Capacity the last time the battery was fully charged.
    Battery ID     11Dell
    Design Capacity     48840
    Last Full Charge     19300
    Last Full Charge (%)     39

    Saturday, May 14, 2011 8:43 AM
  • I have started to get this issue now. It happened suddenly and always shows the "Consider Replacing Your Battery" message. Following the information here and running the powercfg /energy it reports 30% last full charge. The biggest issue is that running on battery lasts a couple of minutes and as soon as it hits 88% remaining it hibernates. 

    However, if I disable the ASPI battery driver in device manager the battery can run the laptop for the normal amount of time (give or take).  I would say the battery appears to be fine and it's the OS that's suddenly upset.

    How do I go about fixing this? If you need any further information please let me know.

    Thanks,

    Simon.


    Simon Jefferies
    Tuesday, May 24, 2011 2:46 PM
  • Hi

    I'm another user with battery problems after installng SP1 for 64-bit Windows 7.  But I've found a really simple fix for Sony VAIO users ... Unfortuantely, only after the Sony Battery Checker software destroyed my battery. 

    My battery would discharge from 100% to zero in only 52 minutes - it was nearly new and previously, before SP1, had 3 hours life... Sony Support have been worse than useless ... Unfortunately, in just a few weeks while waiting for a solution / working it out myself, my battery has been damaged. 

    My problem was not the battery but the Sony VAIO battery management software which stopped working after I installed the 64-bit Windows 7 update Service Pack 1 (SP1).  In a specific timed test for Sony Support the battery took 47 minutes to discharge to 50% and then rapidly discharged from 50% to zero in the following 4 minutes.  In all tests I performed the machine did not ‘turn off’ but crashed as if the battery had been ripped out, prompting a safe-start by windows each time.  From zero charge, the battery was re-charging to 100% charge in about 20 minutes.

    The solution for Sony VAIO (that worked for me) -  run the VAIO Care Recovery and Restore programme (from the start menu), use the Recovery option – Reinstall Applications and Drivers – and re-installed the Battery Checker (tick the check box option)

    For other makes of laptop ... is there an equivalent to the Sony VAIO Battery Checker software that can be re-installed?

    Hope this helps :)

     

    Meanwhile, here's the detail of what happened to me in case others in this forum have similar problems - including the way Sony Support refused to accept their problem and blamed Microsoft:

    After I installed the Windows 7 update for SP1 my battery performance died - the battery would discharge from 100% to zero in only 52 minutes (it was nearly 3 hours before installing SP1).   

    Sony Support were useless, so I started to read many technical discussion forums online and found that hundreds of Sony users have the same problem with battery performance with no solution.  Many discussions online have led back to a wrong idea: that the Microsoft Windows system drivers – battc.sys and compbatt.sys – used for Microsoft Composite Battery management are too old to be 64-bit versions.  This idea is because the Microsoft driver information displayed in the Device Manager window shows a driver date of 21/06/2006, before Windows 7 64-bit was deployed.  However the actual hidden driver files in the Windows System folder (version 6.1.7) are dated 14/07/2009 and are indeed 64-bit versions.  I found this after I spent hours looking for new versions of the drivers and when I couldn’t find any mention, let alone new versions, I then checked the actual file properties myself and discovered the Microsoft drivers are fine (even though there is a Microsoft error displaying the date using Device Manager).  Similarly, many users had tried BIOS updates with no joy (so I left that update option alone).

    I then investigated other ideas – and checked that the version of Sony VAIO Power Management and Battery Checker VAIO (part of the Sony Notebook Utilities exe) for my machine (VPCEB3C5E).  The latest versions I could see online (Sony sites) all appear to be the same versions as those already installed on my machine. 

     However, I tried one final, simple action and it fixed my machine:

    I used the VAIO Care Recovery and Restore programme (start menu), use the Recovery option – Reinstall Applications and Drivers – and re-installed the Battery Checker (check box option).

    This fixed the problems with the battery management where the machine suddenly crashes without adequate warning when the battery is discharging. The battery now shows a steady discharge from 100% down to zero (remember, before it discharged quickly down to 50% and then from 50% to zero in the last 4 minutes). It also charges back up at a steady (safe) rate rather than rapidly.

    Unfortunately, my battery is now damaged but Sony Support do not want to know.  In the several weeks while the software was not working properly the battery had been rapidly re-charged, over-charged and is now damaged.  The previous battery life of over 2.5 hours in normal use (let alone test conditions doing nothing) has been reduced to less than an hour since the 64-bit Windows 7 SP1 installation.

    Things cannot still be fully correct with the Sony battery management software because the battery health status in the VAIO Control Centre is still displaying GOOD.  So Sony Support will not replace the battery, even though previously they contradicted themselves by saying I had to run industry standard tests - now when the tests show the battery is faulty Sony then go back to relying on software that was the cause of the problem.  Unbelievable !!!

    Moreover, the Sony European Support guy escalated my case (5568077) and the response he got was this is a Windows 7 issue and not a Sony problem ... Therefore, should I ask Microsoft for a new Sony battery even though it was the Sony software at fault?  Even more unbelievable !!!!!!

    So, to all all Sony VAIO Users:  Don't install Windows 7 SP1 and expect Sony Support to help.  

    Therefore, as a warning to all Sony 64-bit Windows 7 users:  If you install Windows 7 SP1 and the Sony VAIO battery management software ruins your battery, Sony Support won't to replace it but will blame Microsoft instead.

     

     


    Cheers RB, England
    • Proposed as answer by aka HarRy Saturday, June 18, 2011 7:03 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by aka HarRy Saturday, June 18, 2011 7:04 PM
    Tuesday, May 24, 2011 9:14 PM
  • well i was having the same problem today. I did a fresh installation on an HP G60-120US and low behold the battery was stuck on 40%. With Vista it worked quite well. So after few searches via good and forum reading I ended up here. I did the option to uninstall and then re-install the ACPI but to no avail. The god damn thing would not charge. So then i began doing some searching in the Cmos ( looking for any options to enable or disable ). 



    THERE IS WHERE I SAW THE LIGHT ( well at first i didnt know but I believed it could be a factor)

    I realized that the Date was set back to 2008 0r 2009 ( I quickly adjusted it ), did a reboot and walla.. My batter began charging again. Now its charged to full capacity. I do hope this helps.  
    Saturday, June 18, 2011 7:08 PM
  • I am facing the same problem with my Dell laptop 1440, it was working fine till last night but today it is showing the same error with a blinking cross on icon, stating that consider replacing your batter. however this is just 8 months old battery. it provides me 2 hrs plus run time. this icon is annoying me so much that i cant remove my eyes from that.

    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 3:05 AM
  • I am facing the same problem with my Dell laptop 1440, it was working fine till last night but today it is showing the same error with a blinking cross on icon, stating that consider replacing your batter. however this is just 8 months old battery. it provides me 2 hrs plus run time. this icon is annoying me so much that i cant remove my eyes from that.

    This message popped up on my new Dell 1520 laptop last night as well. There was one message saying the battery could no longer hold a full charge, the red X stays there all the time even when 100% charged, and the "consider replacing your battery" message also is there all the time.  This laptop is just over ONE MONTH OLD.  How could the battery have lost all that charging capacity??

    Friday, June 24, 2011 7:00 PM
  • Contact Dell, you could have a bad battery, battery technology is very good at this day in age, that does not mean you wont get a bad one.
    Friday, June 24, 2011 10:27 PM
  • maybe the battery has aquired some form of memory, ie do you always use the laptop with the power cord in? if so then try to fully discharge the battery.

     

    after it gives the error and turns off, try and turn it back on again withouut the power cord, keep doing so until the battery completely discharges,

     

    then charge fully, remove the cord and use laptop on battery only

     

    repeat this until battery acquires an acceptable memory state

    Thursday, July 14, 2011 2:42 PM
  • My battery problems seem to be just a little different from everyone elses. I have an emachines EM250 thats about a year and a half old running Windows 7 starter. About a week ago my battery started acting weird. Ive never used my battery that much and it held decent charge. Suddenly it would charge to 87%, the orange light never turned green and it would just hang there at 87%. After about 12 hours plugged in the light would go off, but never turn green to indicate a full charge at 100%. I let it run through another battery discharge cycle and then it would only charge to 57% and hang there. I did a lot of research and tried many of the suggestions out there and so far the only thing that seemed to sort-of work was doing a full discharge with ACPI DISABLED. Uninstall doesnt work. Must be DISABLED. I let it discharge while disabled and it seems to still have decent life. Ive tried removing battery after a full discharge, waiting hours before I charge it, holding power button for 30 seconds, etc and when I plug it in to charge it doesnt matter if I enable the ACPI or leave it disabled. I can only get my battery to charge up to 79%. It seems that it charges pretty quickly at first and when it hits around 70% the charge slows down to only charge 5% in about an hour. Its very strange. If I continue to leave it charging it will say "plugged in, not charging". Ive tried removing the battery and replacing it, but all that does it tell me its charging but not actually charge any further than 79%. It seems that something is telling my battery that its already charged to 100% and its misreading its true percentage. So basically I just cant get my battery to fully charge to 100%. I never did get any red x on the battery or any message that says to replace it. Just this strange behavior. By now Ive done 4 or 5 consecutive full discharges and I have tried updating the BIOS and so far it still wont top a 79% charge. Very frustrating.

    Friday, July 15, 2011 6:36 PM
  • lithium batteries do not have the problems of Ni-Cd of old.

    depending on the chemistry they should last at least 12 months. My netbook is about 2 months old now, and I have not seen any degradation even though every AM I go to a coffee shop and guzzle coffee while reading the news

    If I am near a plug I use it, otherwise I use the battery which seems to last 4-5 hours.

    HP has a better battery but I will not buy it until this one rots

    If it rots in < 1 year, I will likely still go for the better model when I order a replacement.

    Maching comes with a 12 month warrenty, typical for portables

     


    Windows MVP, paid Remote Assistance is available for XP, Vista and Windows 7.

    My page on Video Card Problems is now my most popular landing page. See my gaming site for game reviews etc.

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Hardcore Games | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews

     

     

    ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, im having this same problem with my bat!! tho when i got back to vista the bat last and everything is fine  is there anyway to remove that stupid red x its annoying me and microsft get this problem sorted it is a windows 7 issue dont ask em to replace my bats i have 3 brand new ones as back all have this issue SOLVE IT OR IM GOING TO SUE YOU FOR LOSS OF DATA !!!!!

    Saturday, July 30, 2011 2:48 PM
  • Hi people,

     

    Is there any real solution for this battery issue from microsoft or from anyone here? I have three laptops with newly installed windows 7 and all of them have a battery issue, 1)stucked at 0% battery plugged in but not charging, 2)stucked at 60% plugged in and charging(but on actual not charging) and 3) consider replacing your battery with X mark. 

    Thursday, August 4, 2011 10:17 AM
  • Hi, try to deactivate C6 state in BIOS setup and test. Deactivate C6 state solve the issue for my laptop. I have HP DV7 laptop with latest BIOS F44. I think,it's a BIOS issue and not windows 7 issue.
    Saturday, August 6, 2011 5:20 PM
  • Thanks, but already tried and still not working:-(
    Sunday, August 7, 2011 7:56 AM
  • Ok, let's C6 state disable in BIOS setup and :

    - Use "Normal use" settings in Power management

     Battery settings :

    - On Battery low level option try to change 15 % to 25 %

    - On battery critical level option try to change 5 % to 15 %

    - Save and reboot.

    Sunday, August 7, 2011 10:06 AM
  • Still no sucess my friend, my laptops are hp cq60, hp dv6000 and acer 3100.
    Monday, August 8, 2011 7:35 AM
  • Still no sucess my friend, my laptops are hp cq60, hp dv6000 and acer 3100.
    I'm sorry, it's a manufacturer laptop BIOS issue and not windows 7 issue. Issue is on Linux system too,so... You can wait BIOS updates or expose the issue on the manufacturer forums. Cheer up.
    Monday, August 8, 2011 12:52 PM
  • i installed a new battery into an acer 5536G, Windows reported the battery charged to 60%. This was immediately Sus as new battery's come completely flat (the new battery break in guide stated and many sites state this as such)

    Upon the first charge it nearly maxed out at 47880 (rated for 48840), Well this is what ACPI was telling windows / batterycare.

    I performed the first discharge as recommended by the break in guide, upon startup windows now reports the battery as 33300 being the last full charge. This is funny, i have a log from just an hour beforehand showing it was at nearly at the full rated capacity.

    So the problem seems to be that Windows itself at random instances, misreads the max charge possible and stops charging the battery when it thinks it is at 100%, even when it clearly isn't. Thus causing the battery to commit that value to eeprom and recording it as battery wear.

     

    Fix It.

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 12:50 PM
  • This is most assuredly a Win7 issue. I've been through TWO Batteries already, and was told by tech support to buy a third!! Even after I explained the issue that everyone else here has been having. I have an HP Pavilion dv7 which originally had Vista 64-bit on it when I purchased it. I upgraded to Win7 Ultimate...guess what happened to my battery. My issue appears to be even more severe however. No battery I have tried to get to work will run my laptop. I unplug the A/C power cord and the computer goes off, no warning no time to shut down, just off. And it will not come back on unless I plug in the power cord. I've run every stupid battery test available--HP and Microsoft. No it isn't the power cord, no it is not the battery, it is a Win7 problem and it keeps getting worse. I'm not buying another battery! Someone please tell me there is a fix/patch/hack something to resolve this issue, this is very frustrating. What am I going to have to do buy another laptop?? Gosh, will microsoft comp me the money for a new one, since their software ruined mine!? Doubt it!

    How many more people need to complain about this till something is done? I agree with the other poster, time for a class action suit!

    Saturday, September 10, 2011 9:37 PM
  • I have an HP dv7 too and am having major battery problems. I don't believe it is a BIOS issue. I updated to v. F49 still having problems. Still no battery charge, even with a brand new battery. If it was BIOS the problem should have been fixed by now.
    • Edited by DMFord Saturday, September 10, 2011 9:42 PM
    Saturday, September 10, 2011 9:40 PM
  • After reading these postings (and many many other sites) for over a year now, and trying everything, working with Sony tech support and Sony retail service,  about my 'battery draining in 5 mins' after upgrading from Vista to Win7 on my Sony Vaio laptop, I had enough!!!!!!!!  I should add I had only just bought my Sony Vaio with Vista (8 months earlier) to get away from all of the previous problems I had with Windows XP, Windows 98 ....

    I finally 'GAVE UP' and bought a 27" iMac Desktop.  No more laptops for me and I will never spend another cent on Microsoft products again. 

    So go buy an apple product.  You won't be disappointed.

    If there is a Class Action suit, I want all of the money back for my Sony Vaio which is now a 'paper weight' on my desk, along with the upgrade costs for spending money on Windows 7 and installation, my time and aggrevation, etc...

    It's really Unbelievable!!!!!

     

     

    Sunday, September 11, 2011 4:48 PM
  • My solution, since finding this thread, has been to discharge the battery while watching the "BatteryMon" program output.  Once it reaches a fairly low level, I disable the ACPI driver, then recharge until the charging light goes out.

    I've managed to increase the reported capacity this way.

    I watched a charge cycle using BatteryMon and Windows turned off the charger, even with a fairly high rate of charge happening, as soon as the reported capacity reached the "last full charge" value.

    I don't have forever to keep trying this, because it does take a fair amount of time to do each cycle, so I may just buy a new battery.  But for me, this proves beyond a doubt that Windows is causing the problem.  I looked at the log files from BatteryMon and it indicated that the battery voltage NEVER reached the correct "Float" target.  A LiOn battery needs to reach 4.2 volts DC per cell, then the voltage is held constant while the charging current reaches approximately 10% of the original rate.  This also didn't happen.

    What happened instead is the battery reached 12.36 volts (12.6 volts is the proper target -- this battery appears to use 3 LiOn cells in series per string of batteries) and the charging current declined to 3,542 milliwatts.  The firmware was reporting 98% charged.  Then, for no apparent reasons, Windows TURNED OFF THE CHARGER.  Not only did this not match the correct charging profile for a lithium ion battery, it cost me 2 more percentage points of capacity.

    When I turned off the ACPI device driver and recharged the battery, I gained back almost 3,000 milliwatt-hours of capacity.  Which further proves, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the problem is caused by how Microsoft manages battery charging.

    (Edited to add)

    I've performed a few more "tests", and they pretty much point to the ACPI device driver being the problem.

    As I mentioned earlier, there is a proper charging profile for a Lithium Ion battery.  It requires that the battery terminal voltage reach 4.2 volts per cell, and that the voltage be maintained until the charging current reaches 10% of the original rate.

    Chemical reactions have a sort of "natural progression" where the shape of the charging curve is asymptotic -- the charging current slowly declines until it reaches a more or less constant value.  That's when a battery is fully charged.

    My current charging cycle -- the one going on right now -- began with around 13 watts of power going to the battery, and a voltage of 12.26 volts.  What should happen, more or less, is the batteries are charged until the entire pack reaches 4.2 * 3 = 12.6 volts.  Some manufactures will lower that voltage, slightly, to make up for manufacturing tolerances.  If the voltage sensor is +/- 0.1 volts, they'll set the target for 12.5, because they don't want to overcharge and cause a fire or other bad thing.

    Once again, as before, as soon as the watt-hours added back up to the "capacity" value, even though the proper charging profile hadn't been followed, "something" turned off the charger.  The ending voltage was around 12.35 volts (as reported by ACPI) and the ending charging power was 4.2 watts (4,212 milliwatts, again, as reported by ACPI).  Note that in the earlier test, when the battery was still lasting longer, the ending charge was 3,542 milliwatts.

    This is what's known in the solar power world (what I do for a living, which is why I know so much about charging batteries) as "chronic under-charging".

    Now, I don't have the source code to Windows 7, and I don't know how much control Windows 7 actually has over the hardware, but my test have convinced me that Windows 7 is the culprit.

    I am going to try another one of my "tests" and see if I can get the capacity over the most recently reported "Full" of 11,178 milliwatt-hours.  The problem I'm having now is that I've been doing these "tests" so often, and Windows has been losing a few percent each time, that my battery now dies after less than 5 minutes.  This is consistent with the charging behavior -- not reaching the proper "float" voltage and not reaching the proper "ending current".

    (Edited to add)

    And the results are in --

    By disabling ACPI during the recharge cycle, the new "Full capacity" is 11,243 milliwatt-hours.  As I mentioned previously, Windows 7 CONSISTENTLY terminates the charge when the reported capacity reaches the last reported "Full Capacity".  Without ACPI, a gain of 65 milliwatt-hours occurred.  Keep in mind, this apparent defect has so diminished my capacity that I can't do longer or deeper cycles, but I believe that turning off ACPI would result in a gradual return to the capacity I had before.

    Enjoy!

    • Edited by Beit Ariella Tuesday, September 20, 2011 1:30 AM
    Sunday, September 18, 2011 3:14 PM
  • Greets,

    As I mentioned earlier, I don't have the time to try and get my existing battery back in to working condition.  I'm going to look into running Linux on my laptop and seeing if there is a way to run the applications which =must= run on Windows to run inside of VMware or something similar.

    The short and sweet of what I've found is this --

    1). You should download and install (and paying for wouldn't hurt) the "BatteryMon" application from PassMark.  It's apparently too much to expect Microsoft to provide the tools we actually need to use our computers ...

    2). You may want to recalibrate your battery by lowing the "low" and "critical" power levels.  Set the two warning levels to 2 and 1 percent, respectively.  After doing this, disable ACPI.  As far as I can tell, the warning levels are stored as percentages of the ORIGINAL capacity, while Windows displays the "Current" capacity.  That is, if you request a warning at "10%" and you have a 50 watt-hour battery, the warning keeps happening at 5 watt-hours, even if Windows says you have 30 or 40 percent remaining because you have lost some capacity.  Once you've reset the warnings and disabled ACPI, use the laptop until the battery dies completely.  Then allow the laptop to fully recharge WITHOUT turning it on.

    3). Once a week or so, use "BatteryMon" to tell you how much capacity you had as of the last charge.  Once a month or so, repeat the calibration I described above.

    4). Tell your Microsoft tech support person or sales rep to FIX THE STUPID BATTERY METER.  They also need to fix ACPI so it implements the correct Lithium Ion charging profile, including the correct ending voltage and current.

    (Edited to add ...)

    I have reason to believe that the ultimate cause of my battery's failure is Microsoft NOT following the correct charging profile -- I've been going over all the voltages and charging states.  Whenever the battery voltage has just "happened" to be higher, ACPI reports I've gained capacity, whenever the battery voltage has just "happened" to be lower -- and keep in mind, the target is 4.2 volts per cell -- I've lost capacity.  So this apparent defect in ACPI is because Windows doesn't follow the profile and wait until the voltage reaches the proper target.

    (Edited to add more!)

    I've also found the trick to making sure your battery is good (along with your charger) and keeping Windows from breaking your battery any worse.

    You need to use BatteryMon to do this, otherwise you can have one of those "instant battery death" experiences.

    NEVER EVER charge your battery with ACPI turned on.  DO NOT DO IT.

    1). Install "BatteryMon".

    2). CAREFULLY watch how low the capacity gets before the computer dies completely.  That's the "Plug Back In" level.  Be sure to set the warning percentages as I mentioned earlier.

    3). With the laptop turned off, recharge all the way.

    4). Restart the laptop and start "BatteryMon".

    5). Unplug the charger and use it until "BatteryMon" says your capacity is 2000 milliwatt-hours MORE than the "Plug Back In" level.

    6). Plug in the charger, waiting until BatteryMon indicates the battery is charging, then disable ACPI.

    7). Use the laptop until it indicates it is no longer charging.

    8). Re-enable ACPI and note the new maximum amount of charge.  This =should= have gone up by several hundred milliwatt-hours.  If not, you've either reached the maximum possible charge (if you're repeating this step) or else your battery really is dead (if this is your first time).

    9). Repeat step 5).

    You can do this process repeatedly throughout the day.  You =should= be able to get your battery back to it's "proper" level of charge, so long as you pay attention to step 8).  That's the crucial step for determining how much of a charge your battery really will hold.  If it says some number over and over again, or starts slowly going down, you're done.

    You can do this process over and over again as Windows continues to screw up your battery (IMHO, etc).  In other words, once you've recovered the lost capacity from this (IMHO ...) bug in Windows, you can turn ACPI back on so you get the power meter, then repeat what I've described here to recover the capacity.

    Now, for the matter of the charger -- you will need to leave ACPI running for at least the first 30 to 60 seconds after you start recharging in step 5.  A lot of Cheap Chinese Crap chargers wind up with frayed cords that rob you of charging capacity.  When that happens, the bug (IMHO) in ACPI is worse because the voltage at your battery is even lower than it should be, so Windows screws up (IMHO) even more.  What you're looking for is a charging rate, that when added to the discharge rate you were seeing earlier, is fairly close to the capacity of the charger.  It can be lower, but not horribly low.  Remember -- when your battery is almost full, you'll need less power to charge, so this is just during those first 30 to 60 seconds, before you turn on ACPI.

    And if anyone would seriously like to consider that Class Action lawsuit, I'd be more than happy to participate.  I'm very confident I've identified the causes of the defect and Microsoft has repeatedly said there is none.

    • Edited by Beit Ariella Wednesday, September 21, 2011 10:54 PM Clarify some steps.
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:59 PM
  • Greets,

    It's been almost a week since I found this thread and set out to figure out why the heck my battery has prematurely died.

    I've completely stopped having the "instant battery death" problem I'd been having before, but at the expense of having to either leave ACPI turned off all the time (which means I have no battery monitor at all ...) or turning it on and off all the the time so Windows doesn't harm the battery more.

    To give you an idea, I used to have "instant battery death" in as little as 3 minutes.  Right now, I'm recovering my battery from the latest Microsoft-induced loss of capacity and I've been running on the batteries for going on 20 minutes.  I had the power meter on during a recent trip and ACPI cost me several watt-hours that I'm now working to recover.

    I just ordered a replacement battery -- trying to fix this one, and balancing between keeping Windows from harming the battery more and having a power meter is too much.  The $90 replacement battery is much cheaper than the time I'm wasting.

    My plans are to buy the "BatteryMon" application and keep track of how much ACPI has damaged =that= battery, then do the "turn off ACPI and recharge fully" trick once a week.

    Best of luck to the rest of you.  I hope you can get your batteries working right again, or at least not allow Windows to destroy your replacement.

    Saturday, September 24, 2011 1:59 PM
  • I've faced this problem today and within 2 hours my laptop went to sleep. I bought Dell Inspiron n4030 last week, and installed Windows 7 x64 Ultimate just 2 days ago.

    This is how the energy report stated my battery in the morning, just after the error occurred 

     

     

    Battery:Last Full Charge (%)

    The battery stored less than 40% of the Designed Capacity the last time the battery was fully charged.

    Battery ID  11154 DELL KCFPM15

    Design Capacity  725141

    Last Full Charge  47730

    Last Full Charge (%)  6

     

     

     

     

    Battery:Battery Information

    Battery ID  11154 DELL KCFPM15

    Manufacturer  

    Serial Number  11154

    Chemistry  LION

    Long Term  1

    Design Capacity  725141

    Last Full Charge  47730

     

     

     

    And I followed some steps that some people have suggested. In earlier threads

    after this method, "powercfg -setdcvalueindex SCHEME_CURRENT SUB_BATTERY BATACTIONCRIT 0"

    the red X has disappeared but, when I unplugged the charger, a yellow exclamation point appears at the battery indicator.

    After that I've followed another suggestion made by Alexdro in this thread. After that I've done another energy test and this time it didn't showed up the "Battery:Last Full Charge (%)" error.

    And here's that report.

     

     

    Battery:Battery Information

    Battery ID  11154 DELL KCFPM15

    Manufacturer  

    Serial Number  11154

    Chemistry  LION

    Long Term  1

    Design Capacity  48840

    Last Full Charge  47852

     

     

    The Design Capacity has been reduced from 725141 to 48840.

    All the time the battery was charged to 100%. I've charged it 2 times today and it was charging normally and was draining normally. I can work for about 3 hours yet! The problems now I'm facing are the yellow exclamation point appears every time when I unplugged the charger and the design capacity has been reduced about 15 times shorter.

    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 4:52 PM
  • Hi All

    I am also a victim of the battery issue. I am having a one year old Acer 5740G. And for past two weeks the problem started. After unplugging with in 3 to 4 minute the system will go in sleep mode.

    I have tried most of the things which mentioned in this thread but nothing worked as expected until today. In last few post somebody have mentioned about the Graphics which causing a power surge and ACPI in device manager. I just give try on both at the same time and switched  the view to Windows Classic. Then I have disabled the ACPI in device manager. And to my surprise suddenly the red mark and message disappeared. After seeing that I have removed it from mains and to my surprise the system was up for 38 minutes instead of 3-4 minutes. But the problem is after restarting the battery icon have disappeared. As of now I have put my lap top on charge. Will let you know tomorrow how it is.

    Till then cheers :)

    Arun

     

     


    • Edited by Arun_1980 Thursday, October 6, 2011 5:10 PM
    Wednesday, October 5, 2011 9:16 PM
  • Hi All

    I am back with the good news :)

    I hope the issue is fixed now. Right now I am running on battery and my stopwatch in my Mobile is ticking 40 mins and counting....

    So all you there. Try killing the ACP & Graphics and recover back your battery life ....

    I am really happy with it. :

     

    Dear MS

    Could you please do the needful to  fix the ACP issue. Please let me know if you need any inputs from my end.

    Cheers

    Arun

    Thursday, October 6, 2011 5:20 PM
  • Hurray...... :) 

    My stopwatch just reached 60 MINUTES and counting.

    This includes 33 mins of Internet browsing using Data Card  :)

    You should note that earlier it was 3 to 4 Minutes.

     

    Only drawback is that I cant see how much battery is left :(


    • Edited by Arun_1980 Thursday, October 6, 2011 5:36 PM
    Thursday, October 6, 2011 5:35 PM
  • Fixed the battery issue by accident!

    Just purchased a new recertified TOSHIBA Qosmio X500-Q930X that has this battery issue. While working in the dark I kept being annoyed by the backlight on my keyboard turning off via timer. When i disabled the timer in bios, the battery issue is gone.

    Charges to 100% now and never shows the replace battery message or battery not charging message. All battery items in device mgr are enabled and battery monitor functions normally.

    Hope this may help others searching for answers.



     

    Sunday, October 9, 2011 2:58 AM
  • To Magnet Paint,

    it would help if you could specify how to disable the timer in bios step by step.

    Thanks

    Tuesday, October 11, 2011 10:05 AM
  • Reboot and press F2 to get into bios

    then search around for power options/settings. each systems bios is slightly different layout but all are basically the same

    don't change anything unless you are sure, save and reboot

    Wednesday, October 12, 2011 5:05 AM
  • Unluckily, laptops bios is not "slightly different" and I'd say it's complete "anarchy" among makers.

    In my case (Acer TM 5730) disabling timer is not an option at all!! My system bios shows no timer to disable.

    Thanks again

    Sunday, October 16, 2011 7:28 AM
  • Vegan Fanatic,

    your remark is beside the point.

    The question is a self-evident window 7 ACPI malfunction and not systems BIOS peculiarities.

    Justifiy window 7 all the time, as you usually do, is deceitful and misleading.

    MS is not unerring.

     

    Monday, October 17, 2011 9:01 AM
  • Improvement :

    Here is what improved for me.

    I had the same problem with "consider replacing..." - i fixed that BUT i had , like many others the drain problem.

    Before i had +1.5 hour definitely...after the problem....less than 30 minutes. I know that my battery before the problem was in good shape. My laptop is about 1 year. Compaq CQ71-420ED

    After trying alot of things i read about this possible solution (it improved for me)

    First put in battery management the low battery level to 3% and critical to 1% and with critical reached go into sleep-mode, then do the following steps:

    1. in NORMAL mode : charge to 99-100% (leave ac on)

    2. after charging, shut down and restart in SAFE mode (F8)

    3. in SAFE mode, plug the AC adapter out and let the battery drain completely to 0 and let it shut down itself

    4. plug AC in , restart in NORMAL mode and charge again to 100% (battery should be recalibrated now)

    5. after charge, unplug AC and see what improvement you have

     

    my improvement :

    from 15 min. from draining in SAFE mode , i improved to 53 min. (after recharging) in normal mode

    my energy report remains unfortunately 20% even with 53 min.

      Hewlett-PackardPrimary

    47520

    9677

    20%

     

    i will put further info when necessary

    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 1:13 PM
  • UPDATE : back to worse again : 53 ---->20 MIN. and my battery status is flipping again. Stays at 100% for 10 min. then drops very quickly and last but not least, my laptop turns off itself, without warning, at around 20 %

     

    I did everything to fix this problem. I had a good lasting battery some weeks ago and now....nothing!!!!!!!!!!

    It is a MS issue , that is for sure. When MS does not come with a solution, i will sue them with proof that new batteries become worse in no time at all due to problem that i can not fix. There are others on the tread that had new batteries who became worse in no time.

    I AM VERY ANGRY AT THE MOMENT !!!!!!!!!

    SO MS, DO CONTACT ME BEFORE I GO TO MY LAWYER AND I MEAN IT - THIS IS VERY WRONG. When we can proof officially that it is MS disfunction, MS is in deep trouble again.

     

    Thursday, October 20, 2011 3:12 PM
  • @Vegan Fanatic

    hope this can help

    http://www.2shared.com/document/S96_MLzz/STEFAN-PC1.html

     

    note : previous bios was F23------>did reconfig a week ago to F21-------->problems remained the same so Bios is not the problem here

    note : yesterday  +-9600mWh...now 6912mWh       getting worser !!!

     

    Hope you can help !

     

     

     




    • Edited by raystef66 Friday, October 21, 2011 9:38 AM
    Friday, October 21, 2011 6:48 AM
  • as an MVP this is not helpfull....sorry...of course i know that NOW my battery has BECOME in a worse shape due to some MS issue.

    AND I AM NOT THE ONLY ONE !

    My battery worked some 1.5 hours....I REPEAT 1.5 HOURS!!! and now 20 min. I REPEAT 20 min.

    A DECRASE of 80% in a couple of DAYS, not weeks or years. So....

    Even the corrupt malfunction of shutting down at a complete unknown level now is very, very unacceptable.

    MY BATTERY WAS NOT IN A ROUGH SHAPE WHEN I FIRST ENCOUNTERED THE 'CONSIDER TO REPLACE YOUR BATTERY...' PROBLEM.

    When there comes no solution in a quick way to help me and others , i begin a lawsuite against MS. I am sure now i will win it with all the data of all other people on this board. The problem even occurs on NEW, repeat NEWWWWWWWWWWW batteries !!!!!!!!

     

    Friday, October 21, 2011 3:17 PM
  • I think your reply is totally beside the problem.

    Again - MY BATTERY WAS GOOD and now BAD ! IN A COUPLE OF DAYS ! I THINK THIS IS PLAIN ENGLISH...

    So stop telling me how to use my battery - of course i know all what you say but that does NOT explain why my battery DIED in a few days AFTER having issues with 'consider to replace...' 

    AGAIN : 1.5 hours to.....20 min !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Shutting down UNEXPECTED !!!!!!!!!!!

    Friday, October 21, 2011 5:55 PM
  • UPDATE ...........only 7 min. !!!
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 6:34 AM
  • Vegan,

     

    Having read through this thread, it is painfully obvious that you are ill prepared to offer anyone meaningful advice on this issue. Whenever someone confronts you on one of your statements, you simply throw up another straw man argument and move on.

     

    Could you kindly refrain from cluttering this thread with useless posts? Many of us are monitoring this thread for potential fixes, and your steady stream of unhelpful comments is making it difficult to track what various people have tried.

     

    I'm sure you are a nice person and that you mean well, but nothing you've posted thus far has contributed to troubleshooting this issue. You seem to fail to grasp the fact that the batteries are being steadily degraded by the operating system's ACPI.

     

    Telling people (repeatedly) to replace their batteries is a ridiculous suggestion, because the faulty ACPI will degrade (corrupt is probably a better word) the new battery just as quickly as the old battery. And asking people to post battery data? LOL. We already know that the battery charge state has been degraded, so what's the point? So you can quote the (faulty) bad battery data back at people?

     

    We have several people on this thread who have run extensive charge/discharge tests with ACPI on/off, and they reported that the ACPI is not properly managing the charge cycle. Seems pretty clear cut, and appears to be something that requires a fix from MS. Denial does not make the problem go away.

     

    BTW, as of today's date (10/28/11), MS has a buggy script running on this page, causing the browser (IE) to crash after you log in. You have to manually disable to script in order to post here. Confirmed on 3 different machines at 2 different locations (in US).

     

    Coincidence, or designed by MS to reduce the number of posts in this thread?

    • Edited by mavblues Friday, October 28, 2011 3:15 PM Bad Script
    Friday, October 28, 2011 3:09 PM
  • mavblues Wrote:

    BTW, as of today's date (10/28/11), MS has a buggy script running on this page, causing the browser (IE) to crash after you log in. You have to manually disable to script in order to post here. Confirmed on 3 different machines at 2 different locations (in US).

    Coincidence, or designed by MS to reduce the number of posts in this thread?

    Response:

    My IE9 browser does not crash when I log into this website and thread.

    mavblues Wrote:

    We have several people on this thread who have run extensive charge/discharge tests with ACPI on/off, and they reported that the ACPI is not properly managing the charge cycle. Seems pretty clear cut, and appears to be something that requires a fix from MS. Denial does not make the problem go away.

    Response:

    If this is Microsoft's fault, then why are the vast majority of laptops not ALL experiencing battery problems?

    Can you provide any links/references to these "extensive charge/discharge tests..."?


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    Friday, October 28, 2011 4:59 PM
  • 1. I thank MAVBLUES for his backup. The 'advice' given by f.e. vegan is useless - better : controlled useless 

    2. It is obvious here that many users are confronted with fairly new batteries that crashes as soon the problem occurs 'consider to replace...'

    Even the suddenly shutdown without warning is so far not fixed. I, and many others , can smell that something is not right here.

    3. This thread is in fact corrupted to the bone - as of yesterday, posting here is very very difficult - why ? I have a clue ! When you cannot post here , i suggest doing the following ( worked for me)  : with CCcleaner ( or another ) clean all your cache... or when you are at this page and it won't open correctly : try to wait for a minut , the page loads very badly.

    another thing: even i am logged in, when i try to post here , 'they' ask me to log in again and as a result , the page is corrupt again. So wait a while for loading the page or clean up your cache...that will do the trick.

    4. Vast majority of users only read threads, Rick Dee, and see if these are usefull. And as i can see here , this thread is huge and not solved at the moment. Not by recalibrating the battery, NOT by upgrading BIOS (mostly users dont have to do this) , not by powercfg-tricks...nothing helps thusfar.

    So as a conclusion - MS did not give us the solution.

    I will wait for a solution given by normal users having this problem and hopefully we can prove it's MS fault. 

     

    Saturday, October 29, 2011 7:53 AM
  • Wow, Rick. That was certainly a very prompt response, considering you "experts" still haven't found a solution to this problem in the past 11 pages. Let's see: 1) After about 30 seconds of trying to load this thread, my IE9 gives me a box at the bottom of the screen that says "microsoft.com is not responding due to a long running script". Another poster has confirmed this issue, and I get it on various computers at various locations. BTW, still happening as of today (10/30/11). I don't have this issue on any other sites I've visited. I'm left with only 2 conclusions: a) that a MS product (IE9) is faulty (since it's IE9 that's failing to load the page and IE9 is stating the cause is a long running script on the MS website), or b) Microsoft.com does in fact have a long running script, making it difficult for people to post on this site. Assuming MS doesn't create faulty products, I'll go ahead and eliminate scenario A. That leaves scenario B. Now, is this intentional, or does MS truly not know how to write code? 2) I really shouldn't have to point you back to previous posts in this thread, should I? That's complete laziness on your part. (Perhaps that's why this issue still hasn't been resolved...) Regardless, perhaps you could start by addressing the detailed charging analysis posted by Beit Ariella. After all, he took the time and effort to post his observations here. The least you guys could do is address his post instead of ignoring it. If you're feeling extremely ambitious, perhaps you'd care to explain to the group how batteries suddenly go from holding 2 hours' charge to 20 minutes WITHIN A SINGLE DAY (see posts from Megawhat, WeileMom, and others). That's not how batteries normally degrade, and there are significant numbers of people reporting this phenomenon. LilEddie and others installed new batteries and the problem either didn't go away at all, or came back within a short period of time. Finally, you could address two other items: a)the post on this thread from the computer battery distibutor, stating that he has seen a dramatic increase in battery returns since the Windows 7 launch and that MS's denials are putting him out of business. Other than the new OS, what's changed? Have all the battery manufacturers suddenly forgotten how to make batteries? After all, this problem crosses various computer brands, battery brands, and BIOSes. The only commonality is the new OS. b) Sony European support's contention that this is a Windows 7 issue.
    • Edited by mavblues Sunday, October 30, 2011 8:51 PM Bad Script (again)
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 8:43 PM
  • BTW, this site now won't allow me to put line spaces between paragraphs, even if I go in and edit the post. The draft post has them, but not the final posting. Sorry to everyone for my previous post, which I know is difficult to read - that's not how it was written. Thanks again, MS!! BTW Rick, just re-read this part of your post: "If this is Microsoft's fault, then why are the vast majority of laptops not ALL experiencing battery problems?" LOL. So unless the VAST MAJORITY of users experience this problem, it's NOT a MS issue?? An 11 page thread here isn't significant enough? Doing a GOOGLE search turns up a number of other discussions on similar sites. Still not significant enough? Again, LOL.
    • Edited by mavblues Sunday, October 30, 2011 9:02 PM Bad Script (3rd time)
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 8:55 PM
  • Well this is the 2nd time (in my life) that I have ever posted on a site like this. And it that I just feel I have to respond to all the posts on here. I am not a techie. I do not understand all the 'battery testing' etc lingo. What I do understand is that a lot of people (who do know what they are talking about) are 'frustrated' to no end. So am I!!!!!! Microsoft has not addressed this extremely sad situation, that we are all having with our batteries draining in just minutes, from 1.5 and more hours down to 5 mins (in my case) which is NOT RIGHT. This happened to me over 9 months ago. I gave up, bought a MAC and now my Sony VAIO (very expensive) laptop is a paper weight on my desk. Because what is the point of having a laptop if you can't use a 'battery' at all. So to say I am 'disgusted' is putting it mildly. I will never go back to Microsoft, and I gave up on SONY, even though I have about 10 other SONY products in my home. So all you frustrated people out there. Can't we get something done about this???? Also, I so dislike 'Vegan' sending notes that just seem to 'talk around' the 'real issue'. Do you think we are all stupid???
    Monday, October 31, 2011 7:58 PM
  • Well this is the 2nd time (in my life) that I have ever posted on a site like this. And it that I just feel I have to respond to all the posts on here. I am not a techie. I do not understand all the 'battery testing' etc lingo. What I do understand is that a lot of people (who do know what they are talking about) are 'frustrated' to no end. So am I!!!!!! Microsoft has not addressed this extremely sad situation, that we are all having with our batteries draining in just minutes, from 1.5 and more hours down to 5 mins (in my case) which is NOT RIGHT. This happened to me over 9 months ago. I gave up, bought a MAC and now my Sony VAIO (very expensive) laptop is a paper weight on my desk. Because what is the point of having a laptop if you can't use a 'battery' at all. So to say I am 'disgusted' is putting it mildly. I will never go back to Microsoft, and I gave up on SONY, even though I have about 10 other SONY products in my home. So all you frustrated people out there. Can't we get something done about this???? Also, I so dislike 'Vegan' sending notes that just seem to 'talk around' the 'real issue'. Do you think we are all stupid???
    Monday, October 31, 2011 7:58 PM
  • Hello, In the past two weeks, my battery suddenly stopped charging at 80% and when unplugged the battery life was reduced to a half hour, when originally it was 2 hrs. I use a Toshiba Satellite L645D-S4025 (1 yr old) and use the eco power setting.Today I decided to try to solve the problem and took out my battery and cleaned the dust from it. When I put it back in and turned on my computer, the red x appeared and told me I needed to consider replacing the battery. Now it has charged back to 100%. I treat my computer very gently so I know that this is not the case. I turned off the battery warning so the x doesn't distract me. I have now found this thread and am shocked by how long it is. Any advice on how to prevent or delay further degradation? I will try disabling the battery monitor thing others suggested. I can also attest that this page is having trouble loading and is running a long script. On Chrome I tried logging in and posting but it wouldn't let me, so I just tried Firefox which I use less often.
    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 2:11 PM
  • @Rhyth7

    I have tried everything concerning this problem - recalibration, BIOS update/downgrade, powercfg ... it is just getting worse. Just 3 min. of working time now and i came from 1.5h !!! In a couple of weeks :(

    As an advice i would work without your battery, as i do at the moment, because things are not getting better as i can read in other posts. I wait for a solution and in the mean time i work without battery where possible.

    I think a solution might be to rewrite the EEPROM of the battery and reset things. But i have not find a solution to do this without opening the battery and rewrite the chip with an interface and a reprogram software like Battery Eeprom Works. Perhaps someone here has a program to reset the battery without opening it and doing it via software  ( i know you can do this with printers which fail to print when they have reached there pageprintlimit - resetting the counter helps).

    Waiting for solutions...

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 3:58 PM
  • Hopefully Windows 8 will fix the problem. You people whine too much
    Sunday, November 6, 2011 1:06 AM
  • To Magnet Paint

    Instead of telling us not to whine too much, you might let us know whether you’re taking lessons from Vegan Fanatic or Rick Dee. It seems how you three are all on MS payrolls. Please, do us a favour: save your breath!

    Sunday, November 6, 2011 2:42 PM
  • I also have two laptops that have gone through two batteries each in the last twelve months. Stick that in your T.C.O. calculations.
    Sunday, November 6, 2011 5:08 PM
  • I have been seeing odd battery issue after upgrading to Windows 7 SP1, and pleasantly surprised that there is a long thread about this. Though, it does appear that it is lacking resolution, or rather abandoned.. Here's what I observed.. My laptop battery is fairly old, roughly 2-3 years old. Based on the info on Vista (prior to update), it has about 23Wh full charge capacity (out of 50Wh designed capacity). What is odd though, sometimes Windows 7 report much much lower capacity, and it is random too! I have seen the number showing 17Wh full charge capacity, and just now it says 12Wh full charge capacity. Now, the weird part.. the current charge says 12Wh (matches the full charge capacity) when I boot up the system, and it comes up with the 'battery warning' that everyone has been seeing. The laptop was fully charge outside of OS (kept the AC running when it was shut down previously), so I don't believe the 12Wh number. Then, oddly enough, I unplug the AC, and saw the current charge jump to 23Wh. Now I have 180% battery charge!! And the 'battery warning' disappear. I am suspecting the 12Wh number comes from the previous charge capacity (was running on battery prior to last shutdown), when the OS boot up again, it uses that 12Wh as the full charge capacity, which messes up the battery status report. A while back, I was using the laptop, and only last 5 minutes, even though the battery looks full (from the icon, didn't check the actual capacity). This was happening even though the laptop was connected on AC for a long time. Current suspicion, windows 7 incorrectly log the full capacity, and if it was shutdown with non-full capacity, that last charge number will become the new full charge capacity. It will show up as 100% charge, though it is incorrect. I suspect this is why it is not charging because it thinks it is already full. I guess I'll do more experiment on this to confirm the behavior. edit: the paragraph is messed up.
    • Edited by vaxlD Tuesday, November 8, 2011 6:03 AM seeing badly formatted
    Tuesday, November 8, 2011 6:01 AM
  • I agree - it's like the previous charge capacity becomes the next 'full' charge - this means and explains a bit why the powercfg -ENERGY report gives you each time a lower and lower capacity. I do not have the explanation.

    In my case , i can not even shut down properly when reaching the critical battery capacity because it will shut down randomly...58%...20%...75%. i have no clue !

    Onother unexplained thing : sometimes i have only 3 min. duration, sometimes back 50 min.. sometimes 20 min. ...so everything remains unexplainable.

    I am still rather convinced that when we find a solution, we do not have to throw our batteries away- i think the batteries, when 'resetted' in a way, will do their jobs as before the problem IMHO , but not sure. 

    Tuesday, November 8, 2011 11:43 AM
  • Could you please , my friends Alexdro and KasunEK , explain me what need I do in this step ?  

    "After this I Get and old version for my chipset compatible with Windows Vista and installed it"

    I can't understand !

    Thanks a lot !


    • Edited by Giavvns Saturday, December 3, 2011 12:21 PM
    Thursday, December 1, 2011 5:02 PM
  • It is indeed windows 7 that f*cks up the chips inside the battery witch controll the loading behavior from the battery cells. My laptop went from 4 hours use after a update from win7-64 at once to 20 minutes use. This threat is now running for years, we are for god sake at part 11, and microsoft does nothing to repair it. So we must conclude that microsoft made a agreement with the battery factories to f*ck up your battery after a year or so, for commercial reasons. What to do is to remove the chip inside the battery, and replace it for old fashion regulators that just loads and unloads. The sh*t with computers and mobile's is that in the past it was a instrument to make work more easyer and faster, now these days some braindamaged morans are changing that and make it instruments to controll you and your walled. So what you buy these days is nothing more then a controll system that takes your freedom. Better is a OS that is not Microsoft oriented to get your freedom back.
    Saturday, December 3, 2011 4:46 AM
  • After two years of plenty it is clear that Microsoft is not going to solve the situation. but rather tries to passes. should see that a majority of the laptops that use Windows 7 battery problems in some time. I read almost everything they read about this problem. does not work! batteries go quickly if you use Windows 7. Presario CQ61 laptop happened to me too. battery capacity after a few months (OEM) appear drastically decreased the same problem (consider switching to battery). because the battery is an expensive component we have only one option! not to use Windows 7 (shame as I liked) Windows 7 is bad for your laptop battery! famous driver "Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery" is 21. June 2006 and is made by Microsoft. no comment! back to Windows XP, Vista or whatever you want and you'll save battery. this is the solution. any other method does not work on static rather than a short time. LATER EDIT It seems that after the SP1 update red X disappears ... for how long? Microsoft what happens? : after i buy a new battery I say goodbye to Windows 7 if the problem was not resolved by this update. keep you informed
    • Edited by Jorj21 Friday, December 9, 2011 6:50 PM
    Friday, December 9, 2011 7:16 AM
  • Just to add a personal experience for this topic.

    I brought my wife a brand new Toshi Sattelite L750 Laptop with Win 7 Premium and i noticed that when i cracked the box open and turned it on it was completly dead (no power) I sell a few laptops as part of my side business every year and every notebook has a pretty good level of charge out of the box. 

    So i plugged in the power adapter and it took 2 hrs to do the initial recovery to a 64bit version. The very first thing I did was open up the toshi energy management application and the battery status was orange and was suggesting that i replace the battery. The native windows battery status indicates 0% Charge with the power adapter plugged in and at 100% charge. When unplugged, the windows battery indicator says to "consider replacing the battery" when charge gets below 30%) I would estimate that the battery lasts about 1.5 to 2 hrs under heavy use (Installing and copying from an external HDD)

    I intend on contacting toshiba about this as i believe that it is a fault in the battery or maybe the power system, but I just thought i'd share my particular experience.

    Monday, December 26, 2011 10:03 AM
  • Dear friends...

    1st comment in 2012,this thread has been on for 11 pages now. it seems as if we have all given up. I joined this unfortunate crowd in July 2011, it has subsequently been hell for me with a battery that lasts for just 2minutes no matter the amount of charging. By the way i had a Toshiba satellite A505. i had used it for just 8months. I had a Windows 7 home basic pre-installed... i  formatted my system and changed it to a 7 Professional edition, a week after, i mistakenly ran the battery down to 0% and afterwards when i got electricity, the dreaded red x on the battery icon came up. it has been hell since then. I am very angry microsoft is doing nothing to rectify this sad situation. Some people live in Africa where it is hard to get a battery especially a 12 cell one

     

    i noticed a vast majority got the problem switching from Vista to 7.

    I got mine windows 7 to 7

     

    By the way, before the format, my battery was lasting 3hrs30mins, 1 week after the format, 3minutes

    8month old battery

    Friday, January 13, 2012 4:52 AM
  • Dear friends...

    1st comment in 2012,this thread has been on for 11 pages now. it seems as if we have all given up. I joined this unfortunate crowd in July 2011, it has subsequently been hell for me with a battery that lasts for just 2minutes no matter the amount of charging. By the way i had a Toshiba satellite A505. i had used it for just 8months. I had a Windows 7 home basic pre-installed... i  formatted my system and changed it to a 7 Professional edition, a week after, i mistakenly ran the battery down to 0% and afterwards when i got electricity, the dreaded red x on the battery icon came up. it has been hell since then. I am very angry microsoft is doing nothing to rectify this sad situation. Some people live in Africa where it is hard to get a battery especially a 12 cell one

     

    i noticed a vast majority got the problem switching from Vista to 7.

    I got mine windows 7 to 7

     

    By the way, before the format, my battery was lasting 3hrs30mins, 1 week after the format, 3minutes

    8month old battery

    I have the same laptop.. Apparently my research concudes that something in windows 7 is killing the lifecycle of ion-based batteries.

    I will research further and find what is causing it soon. Yes after 3 years there is still a problem with a microsoft product.

    Maybe windows 8 will have the solution?

     

    Monday, January 30, 2012 2:52 AM
  • I have an 18month old Acer Aspire 7738G laptop. Up until about 4 months ago the battery worked fine giving me 2-3 hours off mains power. It then started to produce this dead battery notice and indeed shuts my computer down if i'm not pretty swift at plugging it back in. I bought a new correct and original battery which made no difference. Yes, Microsoft what is the point of a laptop if I can't move it without a power lead. For goodness sake fix it!
    Tuesday, February 7, 2012 10:35 AM
  • Forgot to mention - running Windows 7 from beginning - it was pre-installed on purchase.
    Tuesday, February 7, 2012 10:39 AM
  • I have an 18month old Acer Aspire 7738G laptop. Up until about 4 months ago the battery worked fine giving me 2-3 hours off mains power. It then started to produce this dead battery notice and indeed shuts my computer down if i'm not pretty swift at plugging it back in. I bought a new correct and original battery which made no difference. Yes, Microsoft what is the point of a laptop if I can't move it without a power lead. For goodness sake fix it!

    Welcome to the club,hehhheh...!
    Sunday, February 12, 2012 8:09 PM
  • Windows 7 is not causing this.

    Computer manufacturers know that laptop batteries only last about a year and therefore have only provided laptop batteries with a year of warranty while providing warranty for the rest of the system for much longer. Windows 7 provides a replace your battery warranty when it notices that the current maximum capacity of the battery is 50% or less than the original maximum capacity of the battery is. Windows is getting these values directly from the BIOS and these values are read only from the Windows end.

    If your battery or computer is less than a year old, contact your laptop's manufacturer and under most cases they will replace the battery for you. 

    If you purchase a new battery and are still having the same issue then you may want to call your laptop's manufacturer and they may want to check out the laptop's motherboard as there may be an issue over there. 


    Matthew Arkin - MVP - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied

    Sunday, February 12, 2012 8:29 PM
  • I would first like to apologize, I am an auto technician and, I just looked again and this thing doesn't have wheels on it......

                    Here is my trouble, I have an HP Mini 1154NR PC and has a windows 7 32bit OS

    I just purchase a new 6 cell battery from AtBatt and Installed it and noticed the charge indicator is very low so i put my pointer on the indicator and it said 1%available(plugged in,charging). Well to show how dumb I am I have been lookin' for the Alternator,regulator and fan belt for 3 hours I figured I had better find  someone who knows something about these little dudes to help so, PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!!

                   Thanks for your Patience,

                                                       D.  

    Sunday, February 12, 2012 11:14 PM
  • Don't listen to the foolish replies from VEGAN FANATIC and MATTHEW ARKIN.

    Please stop messing with us ! Batteries , even new ones, that suddenly, after upgrading to what kind of f*cking windows stupid sick number, die suddenly !

    So stop you MVP  fools !!!

    WE KNOW BETTER.

    It has nothing to do with our laptop, you morons !

    FIX the problem and shut up and DO something. Bios CRAP ! 

    Monday, February 13, 2012 7:35 AM
  • Hi Ray,

    Its pretty much physically impossible for Windows to be causing these issues. Lithiom-Ion batteries, the ones used in laptops, naturally die over time. Windows 7, unlike Windows XP and Vista, will automatically check your battery health by reading from the computer's hardware its current maximum capacity vs its original maximum capacity, both these values are read-only from the Windows-end. Microsoft and Windows has no way to change how/what values are being displayed. 

    Long Story Short: If your laptop is less than a year old, give your laptop's manufacturer a call, they'll most likely replace the battery without much issues. If it is more than a year old, your laptop's battery is expected to go bad, thats why most extended warranty's don't cover batteries.


    Matthew Arkin - MVP - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied

    Monday, February 13, 2012 11:51 AM
  • Hi Matthew,

    Then i have 1 simple and plain question for you - hopefully you can explain...otherwise you don't know more about it-stuff then me.

    OK... Why...why does a battery that had the day before 2.5 hours of working time, SUDDENLY with NO SPECIFIC REASON, 5 min. or less working time?

    Just answer that please - no blablabla.

    When you answer that correctly without the same blablabla as usual, you're my buddy ...OK ?!?!

    Monday, February 13, 2012 12:02 PM
  • Under normal circumstances that shouldn't happend. Turn on your computer, boot into setup or into a Linux Live CD and see how long that battery lasts you then compare that to Windows. Remember though that Windows also uses up more battery than a Linux Live Cd might and certainly more than booting into setup would as it would be using your graphics card, wireless device, accessing the harddrive, using much more cpu. By ensuring you have the latest drivers and bios, you are ensuring that Windows should be accessing these devices more efficently using much less battery. Much of the time simply by turning off wifi and decreasing screen brightness you can increase your battery life 30 minutes to an hour.

    Matthew Arkin - MVP - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied

    Monday, February 13, 2012 2:21 PM
  • ok - there we are finally!

    'under normal circumstances this SHOULDN'T HAPPEN'  -GLAD TO HEAR THAT FINALLY!

    The circumstances were and are by many of our users the same and stay that way, whatever windows, brightness and other parameters may influence the battery time. So, when these parameters stay the same AND we normally had 2.5 hours of power AND we have a drop in just a blink of an eye to almost ZERO of power, we have something that is most amazing , no ?!?!

    2 possibilities : 

    1. like proven on printers, there is a parameter which inflict fail of duty after x-number of pages. This is proven and exists. So, maby, there is a parameter in batteries that makes batteries run out at a certain time. Why ? To sell more batteries of course.

    2. It's a problem within windows itself. I don't no why, where or how (maybe after upgrading something), but this conflict is with most of our users the same. Drop of power within no time and i mean no time even with NEW batteries !

    So 2 possibilities which imho windows is the most possible cause to that because new batteries have the same problem.

    Monday, February 13, 2012 2:46 PM
  • Windows 7 is not causing this.

    Computer manufacturers know that laptop batteries only last about a year and therefore have only provided laptop batteries with a year of warranty while providing warranty for the rest of the system for much longer. Windows 7 provides a replace your battery warranty when it notices that the current maximum capacity of the battery is 50% or less than the original maximum capacity of the battery is. Windows is getting these values directly from the BIOS and these values are read only from the Windows end.

    If your battery or computer is less than a year old, contact your laptop's manufacturer and under most cases they will replace the battery for you. 

    If you purchase a new battery and are still having the same issue then you may want to call your laptop's manufacturer and they may want to check out the laptop's motherboard as there may be an issue over there. 


    Matthew Arkin - MVP - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied

    My friend you are absolutely wrong !  You must check your sources about all these you tell us !  I formatted the laptop , I installed Ubuntu and now the battery works perfectly !  Why does this happen ?  Please inform us !

    Thanks !

    Monday, February 13, 2012 6:11 PM
  • @Giavvns

    Did you have the same battery problems ? Drop of batterypower time, "consider replacing your battery"...

    Did the formatting and Ubuntu really helped for you ?

    ps : indeed, the MVP's are telling us nothing usefull here. Allways telling us how to save batterytime instead of solving the problem. At the end they will tell us not to start our laptop again just to savr the battery time. It;s a shame indeed.

    Tuesday, February 14, 2012 12:54 PM
  • Official Statement from Microsoft: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2010/02/08/windows-7-battery-notification-messages.aspx

    Matthew Arkin - MVP - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied

    Tuesday, February 14, 2012 1:01 PM
  •  

    @Matthew Arkin MVP Microsoft Partner

    Thank you, thank you very much. This is exactly the kind of contribution we all really expect to see from MS Partners. There’s no doubt this two years old “Official Statement from Microsoft” off-loading responsibility onto “all original PC makers” will ultimately solve our battery glitches.

    It’s self-evident that Window 7 is killing our batteries and it’s useless to deny the obvious, namely Windows 7 is defective.

    Tuesday, February 14, 2012 5:16 PM
  • Hi Cozzer,

    I've spoken to a number of techs about this, there is no sign that Windows 7 or any Microsoft product is killing batteries. The way that modern batteries and motherboards are designed, simply using your laptop will not "kill" your battery. Lithium-ion batteries will naturally lose their capacity over time, different usage types may extend or shorten its standard life-time but all batteries will lose life over time. 

    Windows 7 now has a built in notification that warns users when its battery has reached 50% of its original capacity, many users have taken this to believe that Windows 7 has "killed" their battery when they made the upgrade but all the research has shown that their battery had already been at 50% or less than its original capacity. 

    Windows 7 will use more battery and discharge a battery faster than simply booting into setup or into Linux, and the more recharge cycles the faster a batteries lifetime may decrease. This however is not an issue with Windows 7.

    Most batteries have a warranty of 1 year, if its within that year call up your OEM and they'll gladly replace it. If its past a year, its expected that your battery will have reached its end of life.

    *Sent email to some Microsoft contacts requesting a comment on this post, but they will most likely re-iterate what I and other Microsoft MVPs, Partners, and other Microsoft moderators have posted in this thread.


    Matthew Arkin - MVP - Microsoft Partner - http://twitter.com/Microsoft_Cares - All posts are "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied

    Tuesday, February 14, 2012 5:33 PM
  • Matthew, 

    STOP talking nonsense. The notification when the battery reaches 50% is BS! When i had the notification  my battery showed only 9% of a full capacity. And that after my battery had worked for 2.5 hours. Next moment BOOOOOOM !!! 9 %

    So STOP replying nonsense will you ! Stop ! Even your so called "indicator" is totally wrong.

    I told you to give me an explanation on those many batterydrops which went from +90min working time to BOOOOM ZEEEEEEERO !

    And you said "under normal circumstances" that shouldn't happen. Answer given. THIS SHOULDN'T HAPPEN. OK !

    So STOP REPLYING nonsense, OK !

    Wednesday, February 15, 2012 7:21 AM
  •  

    @Matthew Arkin - MVP - Microsoft Partner

    You’ve got to be kidding! And kidding us all! I’ve no clue what a sort of techs you’ve spoken to about this issue. However, I do suspect they were all on MS payroll.

    Then you say “the research has shown that their battery had already been at 50% or less than its original capacity” .

    Good grief! When, how and whom did this research? Nobody’s ever heard anything about it. I could have made available my personal contribution to this “research” if I only had known anything on a such a relevant research. How did they collect the related data? Are the complete “research” results made available to us all or are kept secret? I’m fascinated and I’d be extremely grateful if you could provide us with any “technical” docs these techs have written in which they showed Windows 7 is not defective and it’s a “battery issue” only.

    I also wonder, were all dead brand new batteries mentioned in this forum (including mine) just a scrap? It sounds quite absurd that those same batteries are perfectly working on PCs where Window 7 has been replaced with a minor (?) OS, doesn’t it? I’am sure most battery makers would be willing to tell you a thing or two on that.

    You even say “Sent email to some Microsoft contacts requesting a comment on this post, but they will most likely re-iterate what I and other Microsoft MVPs, Partners, and other Microsoft moderators have posted in this thread”. So what? These “Microsoft MVPs, Partners, and other Microsoft moderators” are all untrustworthy simply because they are all from MS.

    Ignoring, as you do, and reiterating, as MS does, there is nothing wrong with Windows 7 is just unacceptable and I do believe that we all MS clients deserve a far better assistance.

    Cozzer1959 – Windows 7 frustrated user.
    Wednesday, February 15, 2012 8:02 AM
  • it is very bad that microsoft did not address this issue for a long time now.hardware manufacturers did nothing too.what a shame
    Saturday, February 18, 2012 9:30 PM
  • It looks like Microsoft doesn't actually look at these things, but here is my experience.

    My battery, coming upon two years of age, has been taken pristine care of. My father is an electronic's engineer and I was taught specifics on how to take care of my things. Today, however, I let my computer die on accident. When I rebooted I noticed the red X over my battery symbol. I ignored it, thinking that it was just telling me that my battery was low. Upon further inspection I saw the error messages that many have listed above. "Consider replacing your battery." "There is a problem with your battery, your computer might shut down suddenly." 

    You can imagine my surprise, I am sure. My lap top has always been fine, I've only ever had one major virus and since my computer has been restored to factory. I keep it clean, defrag every few months. Make sure my caches and cookies get deleted regularly. I decided the first step in fixing would be to updated my BIOS, make sure my drivers were up to date, update Windows, and of course double check all firmware updates. My drivers were beautifully intact and updated. I updated my BIOS, beautifully without a problem. Updated Windows, all clean and clear. Check any firmware settings and remote settings. All perfect. 

    The problem persists. I'm afraid of keeping my computer unplugged for fear Windows will bug out and not recognize the battery as being charged. (Windows refuses to boot properly now, too. It gets almost there and then the computer goes to sleep. As in the software goes to sleep.) I've NEVER had a problem booting Windows, and my system is definitely sound. 

    Toshiba Satellite L650

    Windows 7 64-bit

    Intel i3 with integrated graphics

    The problem obviously isn't hardware related, as all the people have different computers and processors. Come on, Microsoft. Throw us a bone.

    Monday, February 20, 2012 10:54 PM
  • And just to say, even though Microsoft has now included an option to turn off the warning, it doesn't fix the internal issue.

    If you call Microsoft, they'll tell you to contact your computer manufacturer because of the licensing, just so you know. Unless you've payed for your own license, they will refuse to help you unless you pay $59 for the service rendered. 

    For any of you lawyer types, I AM aware of what is in the terms and agreements I agreed to. But when I have a problem with a company's product, I contact the company. Middle men screw EVERYthing up.
    • Edited by Gwyndolyn Monday, February 20, 2012 11:33 PM
    Monday, February 20, 2012 11:00 PM
  • This solution is working for me. You can try:

    - Choose Change plan settings inPower Options (in Control Panel)

    - Select Change advanced power settings

    - In popup window Power Options, expand Battery item

    - In item Low battery level & Critical battery level, you check item On battery; it should be 20% & 10%.

    Before the setting showed 99% & 98% so red cross was always there.

    Have a good luck!

    Sunday, February 26, 2012 4:43 AM
  • This worked for me: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Solutions-to-common-battery-problems#

    you might need to uninstall the battery driver, and then restart your computer.

    Follow these steps:

    Open Device Manager

    Double-click Batteries.

    Right-click Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery, and then click Uninstall.

    Restart your computer.

    • Proposed as answer by alexbk66 Tuesday, February 28, 2012 10:49 AM
    Tuesday, February 28, 2012 10:48 AM
  • Hello people, An interesting fact for all the (it's not microsoft's fault people) and the (It's your battery fault people)... I have a 3 year old Gateway laptop which has had 3 different operating systems installed on it, in it's lifetime it has seen Windows Vista, Windows 7 and now since yesterday Windows 8 consumer trial. Here are my findings:- 1. When it had Vista installed my laptop had a nice useable 10hr battery life. 2. When it had Windows 7 installed the battery life immediately dropped to 30 mins with constant (Consider replacing your battery warning. 3. Reinstalled Vista and 10 hr battery life returns. (Hmmm how odd?? I wonder what happens there eh?. 4. Yesterday I noticed the new Windows 8 operating system was availible to try through the microsoft website, so I downloaded amd ran the installer, all pre-install checks for compatibility returned ok and Windows 8 was ready to install, 30 mins later the laptop starts up with the shiny new start page with it's icons and cubes, but there.... what's that in the corner???? It's not is it??? YES it's the Red X on my battery!!!! Battery life again back to less than 30 mins and (consider replacing your battery). 5. So much for that, out comes the Vista install disc (Again) and w short time later I have my buggy old vista which runs like a clock full of spanners but at least the laptop stays on when I want it to. So to summarize:- laptop battery works fine with vista, won't work properly with Windows 7 and now won't work with Windows 8.... I don't know why I was expecting anything less as Windows 8 is just Windows 7 with the start button removed and some cubes put on the start page. I won't be buying a new laptop as it has more than enough memory and specs to deal with the next few windows releases but I won't be buying any of them either if they all have the same issues. Thanks microsoft, but no thanks. Alex.
    • Edited by Smartalex_ Friday, March 2, 2012 8:20 AM
    Friday, March 2, 2012 8:14 AM
  • I've seen this occur now on a number of laptops "in the wild" and I want to also state that there is definitely a problem here, and it's definitely the fault of both Microsoft and the battery manufacturers.

    The issue seems simple: Batteries are reporting their current charge levels, previous charge capacity, and original charge capacity. They've been doing this for awhile now, but nobody's really been relying on this data the batteries spit out. Now Microsoft brings out Windows 7, and start using this information to turn off the charger when the battery reads as fully charged. The problem is, batteries are reporting bad data to Windows, saying "ok, I'm now charged", when they're actually sitting at, like, 20%. Windows turns off the charger, and low and behold, the battery lasts all of 20 minutes, because it was almost dead, but Windows 7, based on what the battery was telling it, decided it didn't need charging.

    Battery manufacturers fault:
    1. They're reporting the battery as fully charged when it's not even close to being fully charged.

    Microsoft's fault:
    1. They've introduced a technology into Windows 7,which relies on every single laptop battery manufacturer worldwide reporting accurate information on charge levels (something that is actually quite difficult to accurately determine for a battery to begin with) for all their batteries, past, present, and future, when nobody had ever really used that information before or verified it was correct.
    2. They've made this new mandatory, and it effectively can't be disabled without crippling the entire power management system for the OS.

    What battery manufacturers should do:
    1. Find a way to report more accurate information

    What Microsoft should do:
    1. Immediately add an option to disable this new behaviour of turning off the charger when the battery reads as full, so affected users can use Windows 7 on their laptops without it killing their batteries.
    2. Introduce a "white list" for battery models, where the charger is only disabled automatically by the OS if the battery is detected as a known make and model which has been verified to report correct information. This could be changed to a "black list" in the future to only disable models where a known issue occurs, when it becomes less wide spread.
    3. Work with major battery manufacturers to ensure they don't release batteries which are reporting bad data. Maybe a certification program, or at least a couple of guys from Microsoft who can sit down with their engineers and talk about what Windows 7 requires from the battery in terms of charge information, vs what they provide from their batteries, and give them a way to validate that their batteries are going to work properly with this charge behaviour in Windows 7.

    Frankly the response from Microsoft on this issue seems abysmal. The battery may be reporting bad data, but it is Windows 7 that's killing them. It's Windows 7 that's turning off the charger. I think the engineers in Microsoft know exactly what's going on here, but the managers, marketing guys, and legal department, want it kept under wraps, because they're worried about opening themselves up to legal liability if they admit there's a problem. One thing that annoys me is seeing Microsoft saying "well in every case we've seen this message, it turns out the battery did need replacing". Of course the batteries need replacing by the time Microsoft techs see them. That's what happens when you keep on drawing power from a lithium battery that's nearly fully discharged, charge it a fraction, then repeat the process a few thousand times. Lithium ion batteries don't have memory effect, but you can certainly kill them very fast if the charge level is kept too low.

    As a software engineer working in the industry, I've seen plenty of times where our software has a problem because of someone else's product. I've worked around bugs in graphics drivers, I've worked around bugs in Windows, and I've worked around bugs in compilers. Our company can't just say "I know our product crashes every 10 minutes on your computer, but it's a bug in nVidia's drivers, complain to them", or "I know our product hangs on Windows Vista, it's Microsoft's fault, complain to them". We have customers using our products, and we're responsible for fixing their problems, whoever's "fault" it is. Microsoft is having problems with their customers using their products. They need to address it, and stop covering their backsides. At the very least, give users the option to always keep the charger running. It should be trivial to introduce, it'll solve your users immediate problems, and you can stick your heads back in the sand, and, if you're lucky, avoid a class action.

    Wednesday, March 14, 2012 8:42 AM
  • I have the same problem like everyone else in a notebook Toshiba Satellite Pro 120 .. I thought the battery is drained , but when i force the laptop to continue working after the "you should plug to a source " , it will work fine for about 40 minutes ..It's really frustrating when you see the red x on your battery after that .. I'm running a windows 7 Ultimate , and Microsoft should find a solution as i found out in the many articles in this thread and what i'm experiencing ..
    Tuesday, July 24, 2012 7:17 AM
  • I am very happy Microsoft is receiving bad reviews about Windows 8 (it is karma)...their callousness and indifference about this battery issue is appalling. A perfectly functional battery was ruined after 7-8 months of use. i live in the 3rd world where i can not hope to buy another, yet up till now, no solution.... i am amazed no civil action has  been taken against Microsoft!

    Obituary

    Name-Toshiba Satellite A505

    Life span - 8 months

    Murderer- Microsoft Windows 7

    Former capacity - 4+ hours

    Present - 10seconds

    I would really appreciate it if MS Vegan and other Microsoft trolls don't respond to my post, i need solutions and not lies... The 12 month warranty did not work by the way in Africa, i would have returned that battery...now my laptop has resurrected as a desktop


    • Edited by Soletar Sunday, October 28, 2012 4:50 AM
    Sunday, October 28, 2012 4:43 AM
  • Thank's a lot for the help!
    Tuesday, March 13, 2018 4:05 AM