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System Time not advancing, resetting RRS feed

  • Question

  • The system time on a Windows 7 Pro computer doesn't progress normally at the rate of 1 minute per minute. The system stays on 24/7 but if the time is set properly on one day, the clock and date will show that it has only moved an hour or so in 3 days.

    • The bios clock matches the Windows time when checked.
    • The computer stays on all of the time.
    • The system is set to update time from NTP servers.
    • After a couple of days the system logs show that the system can no longer update from the NTP servers because the time is too far off.
    • The time can lag by as much as 10 minutes just 15 minutes after resetting it.
    • The system has not exhibited any other unusual behavior

    I have looked at a number of forum answers on the web but nothing yet applies to my situation.


    Monday, October 9, 2017 5:56 PM

Answers

  • It is related to the hardware level, so I couldn't answer your question accurately. Personally, I think even after the system starts, the motherboard clock still is powered by battery , and the main power will charge the battery. 


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    Wednesday, October 25, 2017 5:09 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Please try to take following steps to restart the Windows Time service.

    1. Click Start, type services.msc in search box, click Services from result.
    2. Find Windows Time service and double click on the service.
    3. Click on Stop to stop the service.

    4. Restart the computer.
    5. Navigate to the same location to start the service.

    If it can’t work, please try to run the System File Checker tool (SFC.exe) to check system files and recovery corrupted files, here are steps:

    1. Open Command Prompt (as administrator).

    2. Type sfc /scannow, and then press Enter.

    If it still can’t work, could you please try not to set it to update time from NTP servers to see if the time goes correctly?

    If it is incorrect, please set the Internet Time Settings to Synchronize with an Internet time server to see if it can work. Open Control Panel -> Clock, Language, and Region –> Date and Time -> Internet Time -> set Synchronize with an Internet time server -> select time.windows.com in Server -> Update now.


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    Tuesday, October 10, 2017 9:21 AM
  • When I looked at the Windows Time service it was running. I stopped the service, restarted the computer and when I looked again the service had not restarted itself on reboot. I restarted the service manually and it started without any problem. I ran sfc /scannow and it completed with the message "Verification 100% complete. Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations." The system time is already 20 minutes behind actual time.

    The system manually updates from an NTP server without any problem. I will turn off NTP synchronization and reply again after 4 hours, or if it keeps time reasonably well in that short period I will wait 24 hours to reply at that time.

    Thank you very much for your help.


    Tuesday, October 10, 2017 6:05 PM
  • Million Dollar question everyone; which IRQ is associated with the system clock.
    Tuesday, October 10, 2017 6:11 PM
  • After doing all of the steps

    • Set the system set to NOT update from the NTP servers it lost 5 hours over an 8 hour period.
    • Set the system to update from NTP server and it lost 3 hours over a 4 hour period.

    I actually saw the time change after logging in. It went backward by exactly one hour. No user was logged in, I logged in and looked at the clock immediately which showed 10:39 but then changed to 9:39 about 1 second later.

    So this is still very messed up.

     - - -

    24 hours later with the clock set to do NTP updates and it is now 8 hours behind. The NTP server is not being called because the scheduled time for it to sync is never reached by the clock that does not advance. Help!



    Wednesday, October 11, 2017 4:37 AM
  • Did the PC join a domain?

    Let’s take following steps to narrow down the problem.

    1. Completely and correctly scanning your computer for viruses.

    2. Check if there are synchronization time related tasks in the Task Scheduled. And if there are any suspicious executable programs to run in the task, if yes, please disable it.

    3. Disable synchronize the Internet time automatically.

    4. Change system time to right time, and remove all users or group of change system time in group policy (Type gpedit.msc, press enter -> Computer Configuration -> Windows Settings -> Security Settings -> Local Policies -> User Rights Assignment -> double click Change System Time -> remove all users or group).

    5. Please check if it can work well.

    6. If it still can’t work, please try to change the CMOS battery.


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    Friday, October 13, 2017 9:36 AM
  • IRQ 8
    Friday, October 13, 2017 2:17 PM
  • The PC is not in a domain.

    The system has been scanned for viruses.

    The Task Scheduler has no unusual or time related tasks.

    Internet time sync has been off for the last 12 hours and the system has only advanced 90 minutes in that time.

    There is only one user on this system now. The second user was removed a week ago when this problem could not be quickly solved.

    The CMOS battery was also replaced a week ago, but more importantly this system does not get turned off and does not get disconnected from power. Also when the problem first occurred the system was shut down for an hour to see if the CMOS clock kept accurate time and it did. Then when Windows was started the time became inaccurate, slipping back almost an hour. When the system was rebooted the CMOS clock had also moved back an hour.

    Friday, October 13, 2017 2:25 PM
  • I'm thinking of moving the hard drives (there are two) to another identical computer with the same motherboard, processor, RAM etc. It's a Dell Optiplex and there are 5 in this office. Whoever is unlucky enough to be away from their desk that day will get the hardware from this system, at least until I can determine if the problem is in the OS or in the hardware. Does this make sense to anyone?
    Tuesday, October 17, 2017 2:56 AM
  • You could try this way firstly. But we think it may caused by clock crystal oscillator of the clock generator, please try to contact the manufacturer to check this hardware.

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    • Edited by Vera Hu Tuesday, October 17, 2017 10:26 AM
    Tuesday, October 17, 2017 10:25 AM
  • With hardware swapped it worked flawlessly. With some testing of batteries it did indeed turn out to be a dead CMOS battery (I actually got a dud when I replaced it a month ago).

    Dead CMOS battery surprised me because the system stays connected to power all of the time and when it is disconnected from power briefly it doesn't lose it's CMOS settings. Isn't the system's real-time hardware clock driven by the system power? Is the clock run entirely by the CMOS battery? This system is a Dell Optiplex. Do they do anything differently from regular motherboards when it comes to powering the clock? If anyone knows, I really would appreciate an explanation of what the battery does for the clock on a motherboard. I thought it only kept the CMOS settings and clock running when the system was disconnected from mains power.


    Monday, October 23, 2017 4:03 PM
  • Hi,

    Incorrect or slow system date and time and loss of BIOS settings are major signs of a dead or dying CMOS battery.

    CMOS is the term usually used to describe the small amount of memory on a computer motherboard that stores the BIOS settings. Some of these BIOS settings include the system time and date as well as hardware settings. BIOS couldn’t store time when CMOS with a dead battery. CMOS will reset time and BIOS settings.

    The correct clock signal generation not only depends on the battery, the clock oscillator that produces the clock is also essential. Crystal oscillator parameters change, the accuracy of the clock will be affected.

    When the operating system is started, it will synchronize the bios time. After the system is started, the system time will be synchronized with the bios time. If the time difference exceeds 60s, the system time will be automatically synchronized with the bios time and corrected it.


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    • Edited by Vera Hu Tuesday, October 24, 2017 10:03 AM
    Tuesday, October 24, 2017 10:02 AM
  • Thank you, but that doesn't answer my question. I thought that the clock on the motherboard is run by mains power when the system is turned on. Isn't it? I thought the battery is only used when the system is disconnected from the mains. Isn't it?

    Is the real-time clock on the motherboard powered by the system power when the system is on, or is it always powered by the CMOS battery?

    I appreciate your help very much.

    Tuesday, October 24, 2017 3:43 PM
  • It is related to the hardware level, so I couldn't answer your question accurately. Personally, I think even after the system starts, the motherboard clock still is powered by battery , and the main power will charge the battery. 


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017 5:09 PM