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Normalization Rules for countries RRS feed

  • Question

  • Where can I find normalization rules for the most important countries? It is very difficult to configure all the rules for the different countries.
    Monday, March 28, 2011 9:56 AM

Answers

  • I'm in Germany too :-)

    You will need a normalization rule for international calls: starts with 00, remove 2 digits, add + and another one for national calls: starts with 0, remove 1 digit, add +49

    The rule with 00 must be above the other rule, otherwise the "Inland" rule would also match on numbers startung with 00. This can also be avoided by creating the rule for national calls like starting with 0[1-9], remove 1 digit, add +49

    Johann (Berlin)


    Johann Deutinger | MCITP Lync 2010 | MCTS Exchange 2010 | ucblog.deutinger.de
    • Proposed as answer by jwdberlin Friday, April 1, 2011 8:20 PM
    • Marked as answer by Rowen-Xu Friday, April 8, 2011 8:44 AM
    Friday, April 1, 2011 8:16 PM

All replies

  • Eniac,

    Try adding one rule at the end to capture everything out of common pattern. For example:

    E.164 for US is +1485550001 (“+” and 10 digit number). The short dial rules are above (7 digit local – prepend +1478) and so on. Last rule could be (in US case) – “Any number that is longer than 10 digits, prepend “+”. This way, call to Bulgaria (01135932552626) will become +01135932552626 i.e. E.164, later on the trunk strip “+” now 01135932552626 will be sent to the provider/PBX for further routing.

    Another way is to capture the international prefix (011 in US) i.e. “If any length number begins with 011, prepend +”

    What is your home country?

     

    Drago


    http://ocsdude.blogspot.com
    Monday, March 28, 2011 1:19 PM
  • Hi, thanks for your reply. I am located in Germany and I have trouble when people tries to reach foreign countries.
    Monday, March 28, 2011 9:42 PM
  • What are you using after your Mediation? SIP Trink, Ferarri Gateway?

    I see that Germany have variable length number (as any other country in the good ole Europe) and so, your best chance is to capture the international access code “00”. Where exactly you see the problem? Will you provide an example?

     

    Drago

     


    http://ocsdude.blogspot.com
    Monday, March 28, 2011 10:00 PM
  • We use a SIP Trunk. In Germany we have no problems but when a users triws to reach someone in Luxembourg e.g. we alwys get +49 (Germany) added as prefix. I don't know how I can set that Lync knows that this is not a German number.
    Monday, March 28, 2011 10:09 PM
  • I don’t understand why you would have a problem. Let’s look this case up close:

    1.       The “Country Exit Code” for Germany is “00”

    2.       Luxemburg “Country Code” is “352”

    3.       City of Burange, for example, has “Area Code ”= 51

    So, user from Germany MUST dial 00 + 352 + 51 + Phone number (6 or 8 digits) and this is how you will send the number to your provider, who in return will (based on the 00 or Exit code) will route the call for you.

    Based on the example above, how does an user in your environment dials a number in Luxemburg?

     

    Drago


    http://ocsdude.blogspot
    Monday, March 28, 2011 11:53 PM
  • Hello all,

    Drago is right in asking the question on how the user actually dials the number. You can have all the best normalization rules in the world, but if the end user does not dial a number that will be caught by the matching string they will do nothing for you. A lot of companies try to put a rules in place that will catch all possible ways that an end user could dial the number. This is also compounded by the fact that some trunking providers will ask for different codes to be used to leave a certain area/country. So in the above example you would need a matching string something like this:

    ^(0035251\d*)$

    +$1

    This would take any number beginning with the dialed digits 0035251, add a + sign, and send it on to the SIP provider. But also keep in mind that you may need to massage the translation string as well according to what your trunking provider is expecting.


    Richard McGiboney, Support Escalation Engineer, Microsoft
    Friday, April 1, 2011 7:49 PM
  • I'm in Germany too :-)

    You will need a normalization rule for international calls: starts with 00, remove 2 digits, add + and another one for national calls: starts with 0, remove 1 digit, add +49

    The rule with 00 must be above the other rule, otherwise the "Inland" rule would also match on numbers startung with 00. This can also be avoided by creating the rule for national calls like starting with 0[1-9], remove 1 digit, add +49

    Johann (Berlin)


    Johann Deutinger | MCITP Lync 2010 | MCTS Exchange 2010 | ucblog.deutinger.de
    • Proposed as answer by jwdberlin Friday, April 1, 2011 8:20 PM
    • Marked as answer by Rowen-Xu Friday, April 8, 2011 8:44 AM
    Friday, April 1, 2011 8:16 PM