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Capping SUSDB.mdf Database file size on SQL Server 2012 - Yes or No? RRS feed

  • Question

  • My WSUS database (susdb.mdf) is on a fairly small drive (50GB) and is stored there with other database files. The Initial Size (MB) is currently 1,995MB and the Autogrowth / Maxsize is set to the default of "By 1 MB, Unlimited". Should I, or shouldn't I put a cap on the susdb.mdf file? 

    I am not an SQL guru by any means, but I have to manage a database that has SCCM Standalone Primary Site database and a WSUS database on the same instance and I do not want the WSUS database to get too big for the drive where the SCCM database mdf is also located. I have already capped my other database files using SCCM MVP best practices, but I have YET to find anything to help me out with how to go about capping the WSUS database. Should I just come up with my own thing and cap the susdb.mdf file at 3x the Initial Size or something? So right now it's at 1995MB, just cap it at 5985MB?

    Thanks


    Wednesday, June 4, 2014 10:06 PM

Answers

  • The Initial Size (MB) is currently 1,995MB and the Autogrowth / Maxsize is set to the default of "By 1 MB, Unlimited". Should I, or shouldn't I put a cap on the susdb.mdf file?

    You should not. Why would you? The only thing that will accomplish is crashing your WSUS server when the database is trying to expand. Inasmuch as the database size is somewhat predictable (number of updates, number of clients, detection frequency) and thus controllable, there's very little value in expending effort over size management of the database. Better you concentrate your efforts on managing the FILESYSTEM space utilization.

    I am not an SQL guru by any means, but I have to manage a database that has SCCM Standalone Primary Site database and a WSUS database on the same instance

    Is this WSUS instance configured as a SUP? If so, it's quite likely the database will never grow beyond the initial size since client reporting is not turned on in a SCCM environment. If it's NOT a SUP, and installed on the Site Server, you're likely going to have much bigger problems than the size of the WSUS database.
    and I do not want the WSUS database to get too big for the drive where the SCCM database mdf is also located.
    Or you could just MOVE one or both of those databases off of the C: drive onto a drive where space contention is not an issue and be done with the whole thing.

    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCSA, MCITP:EA, MCDBA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Packaging, Deployment & Servicing (2005-2014)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.microsoft.com/en-us/mvp/Lawrence%20R%20Garvin-32101
    http://www.solarwinds.com/gotmicrosoft
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.

    • Marked as answer by Daniel JiSun Tuesday, June 17, 2014 2:00 AM
    Thursday, June 12, 2014 11:15 PM
  • Hi,

    Personally, I don’t think limiting database size won't resolve your disk shortage. When it oversize, you will encounter issue with WSUS.

    Approve updates that are really needed. Run cleanup wizard regularly.

    Have a look at the Best Practices with Windows Server Update Services 3.0, especially for disk space.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc720525(v=ws.10).aspx

    Hope this helps.


    Friday, June 6, 2014 3:28 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Personally, I don’t think limiting database size won't resolve your disk shortage. When it oversize, you will encounter issue with WSUS.

    Approve updates that are really needed. Run cleanup wizard regularly.

    Have a look at the Best Practices with Windows Server Update Services 3.0, especially for disk space.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc720525(v=ws.10).aspx

    Hope this helps.


    Friday, June 6, 2014 3:28 AM
  • The Initial Size (MB) is currently 1,995MB and the Autogrowth / Maxsize is set to the default of "By 1 MB, Unlimited". Should I, or shouldn't I put a cap on the susdb.mdf file?

    You should not. Why would you? The only thing that will accomplish is crashing your WSUS server when the database is trying to expand. Inasmuch as the database size is somewhat predictable (number of updates, number of clients, detection frequency) and thus controllable, there's very little value in expending effort over size management of the database. Better you concentrate your efforts on managing the FILESYSTEM space utilization.

    I am not an SQL guru by any means, but I have to manage a database that has SCCM Standalone Primary Site database and a WSUS database on the same instance

    Is this WSUS instance configured as a SUP? If so, it's quite likely the database will never grow beyond the initial size since client reporting is not turned on in a SCCM environment. If it's NOT a SUP, and installed on the Site Server, you're likely going to have much bigger problems than the size of the WSUS database.
    and I do not want the WSUS database to get too big for the drive where the SCCM database mdf is also located.
    Or you could just MOVE one or both of those databases off of the C: drive onto a drive where space contention is not an issue and be done with the whole thing.

    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCSA, MCITP:EA, MCDBA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Packaging, Deployment & Servicing (2005-2014)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.microsoft.com/en-us/mvp/Lawrence%20R%20Garvin-32101
    http://www.solarwinds.com/gotmicrosoft
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.

    • Marked as answer by Daniel JiSun Tuesday, June 17, 2014 2:00 AM
    Thursday, June 12, 2014 11:15 PM