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BSOD fresh install (fresh install due to BSOD) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi everyone,

    I've been having a lot of problem with my computer since I first bought it one year ago. At first the PC went well for a couple of months and then the BSOD problem appeared. In the end we managed to fix it by changing my motherboard. It then went well for a couple of months and then suddenly BSOD reappeared. I got BSOD mostly in games but recently also on youtube. I tried some things like drivers update, restauration point, etc but it didnt solve anything. I then decided to reinstall yesterday. Now here we are,

    I thought the problem was gone since my PC seemed stable for 1 day but I got BSOD again in the game Arma 2 after 1 or 2 hours of play.

    The code was BCCode A IRQL_Driver_Not_Less or Equal (or something like that) but I got the minidump file anyway

    Please help me I don't know what to do anymore

    http://rapidshare.com/files/1053657588/061113-22027-01.7z

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:07 AM

Answers

  • Your crash was caused by memory corruption (probably a driver). 

    Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem.  

    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!  

    If you dont know what this means you probably aren't

    1-Memtest.
    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 
    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.
    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.
    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.
    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.


    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.
    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.
    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.
    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    Here is the procedure:

    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.
    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.
    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.
    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.

    *Further Reading
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617


    Advice offered in good faith. It is your decision to implement same. Dyami & Wanikiya, Team ZigZag.


    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:25 AM
  • Hi,

    I am back to tell you guys I managed to find my the cause of my problem! (for the few people in need that might see this message) 

    It seems it was one of my KINGSTON DDR3 Ram that was causing the blue screens. I switched them and TADA no more blue screens. Only one problem persists, I get 1 to 3 sec freeze every now and then on windows desktop (seems like my HDD is dying) but it is nothing compared to blue screens, so everything's fine.


    EDIT: I thought it would be useful to add that my old DDR3 Rams passed 15 (and more) Memtest86+ passes with no errors...
    Tuesday, July 2, 2013 11:20 PM

All replies

  • My PC specs are:

    Radeon 6800 Hd

    Asus motherboard P8b75M-CSM

    8 GIG of RAM

    intel i5 3.3ghz

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:10 AM
  • Your crash was caused by memory corruption (probably a driver). 

    Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem.  

    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!  

    If you dont know what this means you probably aren't

    1-Memtest.
    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 
    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.
    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.
    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.
    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.


    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.
    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.
    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.
    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    Here is the procedure:

    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.
    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.
    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.
    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.

    *Further Reading
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617


    Advice offered in good faith. It is your decision to implement same. Dyami & Wanikiya, Team ZigZag.


    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:25 AM
  • Thx for the quick answer. Just wanting to clarify that I already did a memtest for 15+ passes and everything were ok
    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:28 AM
  • Several things you need to do to narrow down the mis behaving driver.  First is to update to SP-1, and second is to remove Avast and replace with MSE.  I wouls also run a system file check

    Microsoft (R) Windows Debugger Version 6.2.9200.20512 AMD64
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
    Loading Dump File [C:\Users\Ken\Desktop\061113-22027-01.dmp]
    Mini Kernel Dump File: Only registers and stack trace are available
    WARNING: Whitespace at end of path element
    Symbol search path is: SRV*C:\symbols*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbols
    Executable search path is:
    Windows 7 Kernel Version 7600 MP (4 procs) Free x64
    Product: WinNt, suite: TerminalServer SingleUserTS
    Built by: 7600.16385.amd64fre.win7_rtm.090713-1255
    Machine Name:
    Kernel base = 0xfffff800`0d84c000 PsLoadedModuleList = 0xfffff800`0da89e50
    Debug session time: Tue Jun 11 22:41:21.359 2013 (UTC - 4:00)
    System Uptime: 0 days 1:53:09.405
    Loading Kernel Symbols
    BugCheck A, {db, 2, 1, fffff8000d8998c5}
    Probably caused by : ntkrnlmp.exe ( nt!KeStackAttachProcess+115 )
    Followup: MachineOwner

    To run a system file check (SFC)

    Open an elevated cmd window
    (Go to start>type CMD>right click and run as administrator)
    Type SFC /scannow
    You may have to run this up to 3 times.
    Let us know the results at the end

    http://pcsupport.about.com/od/toolsofthetrade/ht/sfc-scannow.htm

    Avast  can be a  contributing cause of BSOD'S . 
    Please remove and replace  with Microsoft Security Essentials AT LEAST TO TEST

    http://files.avast.com/files/eng/aswclear5.exe
    http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/


    Wanikiya & Dyami--Team Zigzag


    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:30 AM
    Moderator
  • Thx I will try this and get back to you tomorrow
    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:38 AM
  • I assume you are running Windows 7...

    I looked at the dump file you posted.

    Caused By Driver: ntoskrnl.exe

    Caused by Address: ntoskrnl.exe+71f00

    Log in as Administrator.

    Press Windows button (between FN and Alt) and R at the same time.

    Type CMD

    Type  SFC /SCANNOW

    Press Enter





    • Proposed as answer by Lucky strings Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:46 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Lucky strings Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:46 AM
    • Edited by Lucky strings Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:56 AM
    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:46 AM
  • DONE SFC /SCANNOW

    Everything seems alright

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 5:22 AM
  • I have a question:

    I hadn't done most of the Windows update at the time. Could it be a cause of instability and blue screen in a game?

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 5:46 AM
  • Hi,

    I am back to tell you guys I managed to find my the cause of my problem! (for the few people in need that might see this message) 

    It seems it was one of my KINGSTON DDR3 Ram that was causing the blue screens. I switched them and TADA no more blue screens. Only one problem persists, I get 1 to 3 sec freeze every now and then on windows desktop (seems like my HDD is dying) but it is nothing compared to blue screens, so everything's fine.


    EDIT: I thought it would be useful to add that my old DDR3 Rams passed 15 (and more) Memtest86+ passes with no errors...
    Tuesday, July 2, 2013 11:20 PM
  • Jay

    Glad you are working and thanks for letting us know.


    Wanikiya & Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, July 3, 2013 12:53 AM
    Moderator