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SteadyState, Group Policy, Defragmenter -- Problems!!! RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have been using steadystate the last few days and have been turning on and off the "Hard Disk Protection" from time to time.  One time it asks me that I need to defrag the hard drive before it can turn on the protection. Okay..sso I run defrag and decide to cancel it after a few minutes with plans to finish it up later on.

    Now when I try to run defrag.exe or
    dfrgui.exe I get a block message. 

    [Window Title]
    C:\Windows\System32\dfrgui.exe
    [Content]
    This program is blocked by group policy. For more information, contact your system administrator.
    [OK]

    What I have tried to solve the problem with no success:
    -Uninstalling steadystate
    -Reinstalling steadystate
    -Creating a new admin account, and trying to run defrag from that account
    -Creating a highly restrictive account via steadystate followed by making this account have full privileges (hoping it would 'clear' out the setting)
    -Trying to run group policy editor (my vista version doesn't include this feature)


    Is there a way to change this in the registry? I tried looking/searching with no success.  Basically I'm leaning towards a complete reinstall of the OS to fix this problem or having to upgrade to a higher vista to run group policy editor.
    Tuesday, September 2, 2008 3:27 PM

Answers

  • It's working now.  I ran a 3rd party defrag tool, went from 3% fragmented files to <1%. 
    This allowed me to turn HD protection on and then after restarting turn it back off, which cleared out the setting that disables access to defrag. 

    Unless my problem was a single instance, the software should run a check to make sure defrag is not disabled when HD protection is off.
    Friday, September 5, 2008 1:33 AM

All replies

  •  

    Hi Joe, have you ever turned on Windows Disk Protection in Windows SteadyState? If we turned on this function, Disk Defragmenter should be disabled by Group Policy. If you have turned it on, please turn off it and check the result. If you haven't turned on it, I suggest you contact with our Windows Vista support team via the following link:

     

    http://www.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.aspx?dg=microsoft.public.windows.vista.general

     

    Thank you for your understanding.

    Thursday, September 4, 2008 7:26 AM
    Moderator
  • Yes, in fact this was the primary feature I used.  I have been turning it on a off a number of times over the last few days before this problem happened.  Right now it is currently off, like I said, when I try to turn in on it doesn't let me because it says I  must first defrag the hard drive.  I bet if I was able to turn HD protection on and then off again I would be able to run defrag.  Unfortunately this is a catch 22 situation. 

    Is there a startup parameter to ignore a defrag check? Also, in the next version, the "change cache size should not be greyed out."  The user should be able to change the cache size before enbabling the protection.  Otherwise this leads to a redudant addition reboot (Once to start HD protection, and again to change the cache size.)  I bet if I could make the cache size smaller I would be able to fly under the defrag tolerlance level check.

    Edit: I just realized I can potential solve this by running a 3rd party defrag tool and turning hard drive protection on then off, I'll try this out and report back.
    Thursday, September 4, 2008 12:16 PM
  • It's working now.  I ran a 3rd party defrag tool, went from 3% fragmented files to <1%. 
    This allowed me to turn HD protection on and then after restarting turn it back off, which cleared out the setting that disables access to defrag. 

    Unless my problem was a single instance, the software should run a check to make sure defrag is not disabled when HD protection is off.
    Friday, September 5, 2008 1:33 AM
  • This is an old thread but still an unsolved problem until you just surgically kneecap the senseless restriction via the registry.

    Backup and delete the following


    Backing it up command preserves the key in a suitable file ready for restoration on your desktop, the registry isn't case sensitive

    reg export hklm\software\policies\microsoft\windows\safer\codeidentifiers\0 "%userprofile%\desktop\SteadyStateAntiDefragRegistryExport.reg"

    Detects exported registry key as condition before deleting the key (please don't ask  how to remove the condition --if it isn't evident than you shouldn't be doing this stuff anyway)

    dir "%userprofile%\desktop\SteadyStateAntiDefragRegistryExport.reg" && reg delete hklm\software\policies\microsoft\windows\safer\codeidentifiers\0   /f

    I've verified the changes take effect immediately and didn't require a reboot to immediately start using defrag tools, but reboot if you suspect your particular system requires it.

    Please avoid the sophomoric warnings about the dangers of defragging a protected disk since Steady State is overly protective and prevents defragging ALL drives even those which aren't protected and riskless from defragentation.  SteadyState summarily blocks all defrag utilities from operating when it should've just detected an attempted defragmentation of the protected volume and halted the action.  The benefits of defragmentation are debatable but my reasons are narrow and relevant on those occasions I want to defrag.

    I WON'T BE ENCUMBERED FROM DEFRAGGING A NON STEADY STATE PROTECTED DRIVE JUST BECAUSE that drive is connected to a system that has a protected %SYSTEMDRIVE%

    Oh, and, yeah, I tried the:
    Creating a Steady State by Using Microsoft Technologies

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg176676%28v=ws.10%29.aspx

    And there is a reason 2/3 of the people that read it hate, because it suggests you actually reinstall windows every night to refresh it along with the string of other tedium to "protect" Windows.   NOTE TO THE WORLD:/ Reinstalling Windows every day isn't protecting anything.

    It should've been Microsoft's basic assumption that a SteadyState user is above average, is sophisticated and THUS WOULD ALSO HAVE A COMPUTER WITH MORE THAN ONE HARD DRIVE AND THOSE OTHER  / NON STEADY STATE PROTECTED DISKS MIGHT NEED DEFRAGMENTING !!!!

    http://youtu.be/x0GsNhLt9Ds?t=2s




    Friday, February 22, 2013 5:54 PM