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How to use Windows Performance Toolkit to analyze slow startups RRS feed

  • Question

  • I just installed the Microsoft Performance Toolkit for Windows 10 because I have a very slow startup and I wish to analyze it to understand which service/app/process is responsible for that. However I ma not sure how to use it. My understand is that I have to start a trace by WPR, reboot, stop the trace, and use the analysis tool (WPA) to get trace data in a graph format.

    Can anybody, please, publish step-by-step instructions to do that? I tried to use the Event Manager to troubleshoot the startup but it is not easy to understand if an error originated other errors or is originated by another error. Not all errors have to be fixed. Sometimes, fixing an error, remove all the errors it originated. So I would like to have a look at startup to understand if some process is responsible for time delays.

    Thank you in advance.


    Dario de Judicibus

    Sunday, May 14, 2017 7:20 PM

Answers

  • It is relatively easy to create the recordings.  The challenge will be to learn how to interpret them.  Sometimes it can take a while to find someone to interpret them.

    If you had problems during regular use that your were diagnosing you would use administrative command prompt and launch the application using wprui.exe

    If you are using it for boot problems then you would choose the performance scenario as boot.  Then you would make 3 boot recordings.  If you were doing your own analysis you would use the verbose recording.  If you were posting it you would use the light setting.  The logging mode is changed from the default memory to file.

    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-update/windows-performance-recorder/a1648e8c-50c7-4243-9f1d-4216385c7ff3

    There is a slower method but an alternative method to work on your slow boots.

    Place your computer in clean boot and compare the start up times.  If there is significant improvement with clean boot then you know that it is one of the non-Microsoft applications that is impacting the boot.

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/29876.how-to-perform-a-clean-boot-in-windows-10.aspx

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/929135/how-to-perform-a-clean-boot-in-windows

    If there were 32 non-Microsoft items unchecked on the boot you would then check 16 of them and retest the boot.  If there was no change in boot times after this then you know that it was none of the 16 checked.  If the boot significantly slowed then it was one of the 16.  This process is repeated so that the 16 is cut to 8 then 8 is cut to 4 then 4 is cut to 2 and 2 is cut to 1 which identifies the application that is prolonging the boot.  Also you may find that there is more than one application that is slowing the boot.

    Many people use MSCONFIG to un-uncheck all non-Microsoft items to have the fastest boots:

    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-update/msconfig-the-system-configuration-tool/273dea8e-4cbe-47e9-8489-f400e879ce17

    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-performance/windows-10-performance-and-install-integrity/75529fd4-fac7-4653-893a-dd8cd4b4db00


    Monday, May 15, 2017 9:23 AM
  • Hi,

    To troubleshoot the performance issue, we could to perform a clean boot firstly to verify whether the issue is caused by a third party service.
    How to perform a clean boot in Windows
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-sg/help/929135/how-to-perform-a-clean-boot-in-windows

    To analyze the performance issue deeply, we should use Windows performance recorder to create an event trace log file at first, then open the trace log file with Windows performance analyzer.
     
    For the detailed instruction manual, we could refer to the following links:
    Windows performance recorder
    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-update/windows-performance-recorder/a1648e8c-50c7-4243-9f1d-4216385c7ff3

    Windows Performance Analyzer step-by-step guide
    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/commercialize/test/wpt/wpa-step-by-step-guide

    Best regards,
    Joy.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, May 16, 2017 9:50 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi, 

    If you mean Windows Performance Toolkit
    Please refer to:

    Windows Performance Toolkit
    ___________
    Ashidacchi


    Monday, May 15, 2017 2:30 AM
  • Good place to start:

    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/askpfeplat/2013/03/22/troubleshooting-windows-performance-issues-using-the-windows-performance-recorder/
    Monday, May 15, 2017 6:37 AM
  • It is relatively easy to create the recordings.  The challenge will be to learn how to interpret them.  Sometimes it can take a while to find someone to interpret them.

    If you had problems during regular use that your were diagnosing you would use administrative command prompt and launch the application using wprui.exe

    If you are using it for boot problems then you would choose the performance scenario as boot.  Then you would make 3 boot recordings.  If you were doing your own analysis you would use the verbose recording.  If you were posting it you would use the light setting.  The logging mode is changed from the default memory to file.

    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-update/windows-performance-recorder/a1648e8c-50c7-4243-9f1d-4216385c7ff3

    There is a slower method but an alternative method to work on your slow boots.

    Place your computer in clean boot and compare the start up times.  If there is significant improvement with clean boot then you know that it is one of the non-Microsoft applications that is impacting the boot.

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/29876.how-to-perform-a-clean-boot-in-windows-10.aspx

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/929135/how-to-perform-a-clean-boot-in-windows

    If there were 32 non-Microsoft items unchecked on the boot you would then check 16 of them and retest the boot.  If there was no change in boot times after this then you know that it was none of the 16 checked.  If the boot significantly slowed then it was one of the 16.  This process is repeated so that the 16 is cut to 8 then 8 is cut to 4 then 4 is cut to 2 and 2 is cut to 1 which identifies the application that is prolonging the boot.  Also you may find that there is more than one application that is slowing the boot.

    Many people use MSCONFIG to un-uncheck all non-Microsoft items to have the fastest boots:

    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-update/msconfig-the-system-configuration-tool/273dea8e-4cbe-47e9-8489-f400e879ce17

    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-performance/windows-10-performance-and-install-integrity/75529fd4-fac7-4653-893a-dd8cd4b4db00


    Monday, May 15, 2017 9:23 AM
  • Basically do a boot trace, and then look for the process using the most disk i/o (normal priority).

    Google 'How Many Coffees Can You Drink While Your PC (or Windows) Starts?' for some nice teched videos on performance toolkit.

    Creating new profiles are typically slow, especially if the default profile has been changed.  Initializing windows apps don't help.



    • Edited by JS2010 Monday, May 15, 2017 2:14 PM
    Monday, May 15, 2017 2:10 PM
  • Hi,

    To troubleshoot the performance issue, we could to perform a clean boot firstly to verify whether the issue is caused by a third party service.
    How to perform a clean boot in Windows
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-sg/help/929135/how-to-perform-a-clean-boot-in-windows

    To analyze the performance issue deeply, we should use Windows performance recorder to create an event trace log file at first, then open the trace log file with Windows performance analyzer.
     
    For the detailed instruction manual, we could refer to the following links:
    Windows performance recorder
    https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki/windows_10-update/windows-performance-recorder/a1648e8c-50c7-4243-9f1d-4216385c7ff3

    Windows Performance Analyzer step-by-step guide
    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/commercialize/test/wpt/wpa-step-by-step-guide

    Best regards,
    Joy.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, May 16, 2017 9:50 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you everybody

    Dario de Judicibus

    Monday, May 22, 2017 9:03 AM
  • How do you uninstall Windows Performance Toolkit so no remnants are left behind?
    Monday, August 28, 2017 2:29 PM
  • You mean aside from initializing the uninstall process? From my understanding the adk setup is pretty clean and should not leave any notable remnants behind.

    As a side note: you do not have to install Windows Performance Analyzer to capture a boot trace. Simply copying the WPF folder (or just the relevant parts needed to run ETL recording bits) does the trick.


    Blog - http://www.vacuumbreather.com / http://www.wcsaga.com

    Monday, August 28, 2017 2:39 PM