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Windows 7 install BSOD RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello all,
    I just received my copy of Windows 7 Ultimate this afternoon and when I go to try and install it I get repeated BSODs. I've ran the compatibility check and it says everything should be fine. I'm running an AMD Athlon 64 X2 5600+ on a Gigabyte M61P-S3 with a nVidia GeForce 8800 GTS and 4G of memory.

    I'm running XP at the moment, but I know I can't upgrade directly so I'm trying to do a clean install. Every time I boot from the DVD I get one of two BSODS. I either get:

    IRQL Not Less or Equal with the following STOP codes (0x0A, 0x01B, 0x04, 0x00, 0x8BA82F34) and no description.

    or

    DRIVER IRQL Not Less or Equal with STOP codes (0x0D1, 0x094, 0x04, 0x00, 0x8B3C75F8) and a description of " error: NVSTOR.SYS - address 8B3C75F8 base at 8B3C1000"

    I searched nvstor.sys and got pretty much nothing. A lot of people seem to be having problems with not really any solutions.

    I tried just about everything everyone else had suggested on other forums. I tried swapping out memory, hard drives, taking out the video card, etc. I tried disabling AMD "Quiet and Cool" in the BIOS. Nothing has worked so far.

    The disk boots, I get the gray progress bar, then the colored Windows 7 logo, it's pulsates for a second and then strait to the bluescreen.

    When I restart the computer, if I'm quick, I can get to a screen where I can check for Windows errors or go back to my previous OS. Checked for errors, it found non. Previous OS dumps me back into XP where I get a box that says it was "unable to install Windows 7" and suggests I run the compatibility check again.

    I'm running out of ideas. Anyone run into this problem before?
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 1:09 AM

Answers

  • SUCCESS!

    After trying just about everything, I decided to go ahead and pull just about everything out of the system. I booted with only one hard drive and the DVD drive. No bluescreen.

    It took a little while to finish the install (about 30-40 minutes), but it's up and running like a champ.

    Since I took everything out I can't say for certain what it was that was causing the problem. I had taken each piece out individually before, or at least disabled them. Perhaps it was the combination. Either way, it's up and running now.

    After the install I put everything back in one by one and haven't had any problems yet. I'm going to run a few tests and benchmarks but I think it's good to out. My only advice for anyone else having install problems would be to get down to the bare basics for hardware and start there. Thanks for the help JW.
    • Marked as answer by DocHoloday Friday, November 13, 2009 3:31 AM
    Friday, November 13, 2009 3:31 AM
  • Yes with three hard drives there is a bug and I've documented it.
    http://www.pagestart.com/windows7cleaninstallbug.html

    With only two drives there should not be a problem, even if you have multiple partitions.


    JS
    • Marked as answer by DocHoloday Friday, November 13, 2009 10:57 PM
    Friday, November 13, 2009 7:22 PM

All replies

  • Are you trying to install Windows 7 while Windows XP is running or are installing the Windows 7 DVD and then rebooting the PC?
    JS
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 1:17 AM
  • I'm booting directly from the DVD, or at least trying to.
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 1:21 AM
  • Enter you BIOS and change the default for your Video card to "PEG" and not "PCI"
    JS
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 1:52 AM
  • Also, if you are getting errors involving the nvstor.sys (nForce SATA driver) the problem could be with the hard drive.

    Consider running a chkdsk /r on the drive and/or any other available diagnostics from the manufacturer. 
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 2:24 AM
  • I didn't have an option to set a default video card, but I had an option for enable/disable the onboard GPU.

    I had "Onboard GPU" with the options:
    "Enable if no ext PEG"
    "Always Enable"

    I set it to "always enable" and tried switching the monitor to the onboard VGA instead of the video card. Restarted, booted to the DVD and got the same BSOD.
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 2:41 AM
  • Oh, I also had an option for "Init Display First", which I tried setting to PEG instead of PCI. Same result.
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 2:45 AM
  • Well that elimates the Video/graphics driver as an issue.

    What I would suggest is to remove any unecessary devices (external USB drives, printers, scanners, second internal herd drive, second Optical drive.
    Take the system down to the bare minimum.

    Also consider running Memtest86+, this runs from a boot disk or CD and should eliminate or
    confirm if your ram is bad.
    Let it run for as long as you can, 2,4,6,8 or more hours, if no errors by then your ram is OK.
    See: http://www.memtest.org/
    JS
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 3:42 AM
  • I'll give that a try tonight (at work atm) and report how it goes. Would a driver really cause a bluescreen if I'm booting directly from the DVD? I'm not by any means an expert, but I would figure that if it is a driver that's crashing, wouldn't it be loaded from the DVD and not the system? Why would the windows installer load anything but a low-level, super tested and stable driver?

    Anyway, I'll try reducing the hardware down and run that memory test. Thanks for all the suggestions so far J.W.!

    I guess I'm just confused as to why it would even be an issue in the first place. I'm know my hardware isn't super crazy new, but it's not really that old either. I've never had a hardware/driver issue with XP, I didn't have any issues with Vista (just didn't like it for gaming and went back to XP) either. It just seems odd that an OS that's supposed to be even more hardware compatible, can run well on older systems and seems by all accounts to be more stable, simply can't install. It boggles my mind, which is why I came here for help in the first place. Again, thanks for the suggestions for far, I'll give it another try tonight and hopefully I'll have better luck.
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 2:58 PM
  • All I can say is that I had an older computer that ran XP just fine. Windows 7 (and this was with the RC version) either BSOD or black screened.
    It turned out the chipset was not supported which tells you it was a pretty old PC. I doubt age is your cause, just provided the info to indicate that some very old systems that still run XP are not good candidates for Windows 7.
    JS
    Tuesday, November 10, 2009 4:05 PM
  • I let the memory test run all day while I was at work, it came back clean.

    I updated the BIOS to the latest version (released this summer specifically for W7), still nothing.

    I updated the chipset drivers to the latest nforce drivers, also nothing.

    I updated to a version of the nforce drivers just for W7, also nothing.

    I went back to the latest nforce drivers for XP, which still seems to be booting fine, although now I have to select "Windows Setup" or "Previous Operating System" when the computer boots up. "Windows Setup" throws me back into the bluescreen loop and "Previous OS" just  boots XP normally.

    I'm officially out of ideas. :(
    Thursday, November 12, 2009 5:20 AM
  • SUCCESS!

    After trying just about everything, I decided to go ahead and pull just about everything out of the system. I booted with only one hard drive and the DVD drive. No bluescreen.

    It took a little while to finish the install (about 30-40 minutes), but it's up and running like a champ.

    Since I took everything out I can't say for certain what it was that was causing the problem. I had taken each piece out individually before, or at least disabled them. Perhaps it was the combination. Either way, it's up and running now.

    After the install I put everything back in one by one and haven't had any problems yet. I'm going to run a few tests and benchmarks but I think it's good to out. My only advice for anyone else having install problems would be to get down to the bare basics for hardware and start there. Thanks for the help JW.
    • Marked as answer by DocHoloday Friday, November 13, 2009 3:31 AM
    Friday, November 13, 2009 3:31 AM
  • By any chance did you have two other hard drives (for a toal of 3 drives) when you first started?
    JS
    Friday, November 13, 2009 3:46 AM
  • Actually, sorta. I had a second SATA drive (250gb WD) but it was partitioned in half into two drives. It was one of the things I didn't try removing the first time around. Is there a specific bug related to 3 hard drives?
    Friday, November 13, 2009 3:40 PM
  • Yes with three hard drives there is a bug and I've documented it.
    http://www.pagestart.com/windows7cleaninstallbug.html

    With only two drives there should not be a problem, even if you have multiple partitions.


    JS
    • Marked as answer by DocHoloday Friday, November 13, 2009 10:57 PM
    Friday, November 13, 2009 7:22 PM
  • Interesting! I read your post that you linked above and I'd almost say that with just two drives there's still a chance of it not creating that tiny partition correctly. I had one old IDE drive and one newer SATA drive (split into two). Once the SATA drive had been disconnected it worked.

    That's a pretty serious bug you've documented there. Thanks for the help. Hopefully this will help other people if they run into similar problems.
    Friday, November 13, 2009 10:57 PM