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Controlling and managing my Farm and Site collection upgrade inside Office 365, between setting “Release preferences” and setting “site collection upgrade settings”

    Question

  • We are working on a sharepoint office 365. and i am trying to understand how our upgrade process is working. now seems there are 2 main areas which allow me to manage upgrade of the overall Farm and for site collection, as follow:-

    1. from the admin under this url https://portal.office.com/adminportal/home#/companyprofile i can set the "Release preferences" as follow :-

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    1. for each site collection i can set the upgrade settings as follow:-

    1. enter image description here

    so i am not sure what is the relation between the 2 settings.

    Question one. let us take my current settings where i am saying to apply the updates once they are available (since i have my Release preferences = "First release") for the selected users.. but at the same time the site collection upgrade option is set to No. so will the selected users get the updates or not?

    Question Two. now i access the Release preferences settings from the following url https://portal.office.com/adminportal/home#/companyprofile so will these settings affects all the office 365 products or it will only affect sharepoint ??

    Third Question. inside on-premise sharepoint i can chose to never apply any sharepoint updates, by simply not installing any CUs, or sharepoint security updates... which keeps our on-premise farm in a consistent state.. but from my reading that in office 365 , i can only postpone installing the update but can not prevent the upgrade ,, so is this correct ?

    Thursday, March 09, 2017 12:45 PM

All replies

  • 1) Release preferences deals with how updates to Office 365 will be applied going forward, not how your migrated content will be upgraded.  It deals primarily with changes in the UI like when MS rolled out the new document library look and feel.  

    2) The release preferences referenced here apply to all of Office 365, but in general the places where you will see it are mostly in SharePoint.

    3) Yes, in Office 365 you can delay the implementation of software updates in some cases, but you can not refuse the updates indefinitely.


    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    Thursday, March 09, 2017 1:00 PM
  • 1) Release preferences deals with how updates to Office 365 will be applied going forward, not how your migrated content will be upgraded.  It deals primarily with changes in the UI like when MS rolled out the new document library look and feel.  

    2) The release preferences referenced here apply to all of Office 365, but in general the places where you will see it are mostly in SharePoint.

    3) Yes, in Office 365 you can delay the implementation of software updates in some cases, but you can not refuse the updates indefinitely.


    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    thanks for the info. but still it is not clear to me what is the relation (if any) between the 2 settings? for example the following scenario came to my mind ,, ley say i chose to "No" for Allow upgrade for  site collections, then how will these site collection get updated ??

    second question , are any of these 2 settings control the sharepoint security updates or sharepoint fixes ? or these 2 settings talks about UI and major updates???

    Thanks

    Thursday, March 09, 2017 1:16 PM
  • Lets say that you migrate a 2010 site to Office 365.  If first release is enabled then the newest Office 365 bits will be available.  But if the site is set not to update then it will be running in a 2010 mode within the newest set of bits.  The site collection will continue to run in 2010 mode until you update it or MS decides not to offer that emulation in some future release.

    The first release settings are basically all related to UI updates.  The other setting is based on how migrated sites are updated to later versions.  Neither deal with security updates or fixes really.


    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    Thursday, March 09, 2017 4:32 PM
  • Lets say that you migrate a 2010 site to Office 365.  If first release is enabled then the newest Office 365 bits will be available.  But if the site is set not to update then it will be running in a 2010 mode within the newest set of bits.  The site collection will continue to run in 2010 mode until you update it or MS decides not to offer that emulation in some future release.

    The first release settings are basically all related to UI updates.  The other setting is based on how migrated sites are updated to later versions.  Neither deal with security updates or fixes really.


    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.


    Ok now i start to see my path clearer .. but which settings i can deny forever? and which settings i should get it sooner or later ? or both settings will be mandatory at certain stage ?? i mean will MS force me to upgrade my 2013 site collection to 2016 , even if i define "No" to upgrade site collections ? and will MS force me to get any new UI features after certain amount of time (i remember that i read it is 4 months from publishing it globally) ??

    • Edited by johnjohn11 Thursday, March 09, 2017 6:10 PM
    Thursday, March 09, 2017 6:09 PM
  • On Office 365 you won't be able to deny any of the settings indefinitely.  First release is about getting early access.  All the changes that first release provides access to will eventually hit every tenant.  Normally that happens within about 3-6 months.  The upgrade site collection is to go from the look and feel of 2010 to 2013.  There is no upgrade required for 2013 to 2016.  So that setting has no effect on 2013 or later site collections.

    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    Friday, March 10, 2017 12:24 PM
  • On Office 365 you won't be able to deny any of the settings indefinitely.  First release is about getting early access.  All the changes that first release provides access to will eventually hit every tenant.  Normally that happens within about 3-6 months.  The upgrade site collection is to go from the look and feel of 2010 to 2013.  There is no upgrade required for 2013 to 2016.  So that setting has no effect on 2013 or later site collections.

    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    So let me summarize your replies, so can i conclude the following:-

    1. Release preferences allow us to specify when all users or selected users will receive any new updates. for example let say sharepoint release a new user interface for the announcement lists , then i can say that only the test user should receive this new interface as soon as the new feature became available, then we can first test the new interface/feature,before applying it to all users.

    2. the new user interface will be available to all users after 3-6 months ,, even if we chose the Release Preferences to be  "Standard Release" or we set as as "First release for selected users"??....

    3. for the site collection upgrade, i can keep using the 2013 interface forever , and office 365 will not force me to upgrade my 2013 site collection to later version .. is this correct ??

    now in our case we are eager to keep our sharepoint as stable as possible, with minimal changes, so i can follow this "conservative" appraoch:-

    1. Keep site collection upgrade option to No.so i can be sure that i will keep using sharepoint 2013?.

    2. If we decide to upgrade to 2016, i can run a demo site collection and do the testing before do the real upgrade.

    3. For the Release preferences i can keep the setting as "First Release for selected users", and for the selected users i can specify our Test user only. in this case i can test any new feature before applying it to all users.

    can you adivce on my above 3 points? and the 3 points i am considering as our conservative office 365 upgrade policy ?

    Thanks

    Monday, March 13, 2017 12:58 PM
  • 1) Yes, although you can't postpone everyone getting it forever.

    2) Yes, It will eventually roll out for all users.  In the past that has normally taken 3-6 months, but there is no guarantee on the timing.

    3) Right now there is no update to the site schema later than 2013.  If MS ever introduced a later version you might be forced to update.  But there is nothing like that planned at this point.

    1) If you didn't migrate 2010 sites then the upgrade option setting doesn't mean anything.  So yes you can keep it set to No.

    2) Office 365 is already running 2016, so no upgrade is required.  But 2016 doesn't have a different site schema than 2013, like 2010 did.  So no upgrade of the site collection is required to be at 2016.  You are already there.

    3) Yes, just remember First release won't catch everything.  Some updates are to the backend and rollout at one time.  In that case First Release won't do anything.


    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    Monday, March 13, 2017 6:40 PM