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Running 32-bit apps in 64-bit environment RRS feed

  • Question

  • General questions:  Running Win 7 Ultimate, 64-bit, i7 x980 with 24 GB Ram.  When I open a 32-bit application, how is memory allocated?  Does each 32-bit app receive a full 3½ GB of RAM, if available?  When creating videos in a certain format (FLV), Adobe Premiere Elements 9 says I'm running out of memory.  Does that mean all 3½ GB are consumed or are there other processes, outside of PE9, that are using some of the RAM?  Are any Windows processes using some of PE9's RAM?

    Also, I let Windows manage pagefiles.  What would be using the pagefile when, so far, RAM usage has not gone above ~8 GB whatever I'm doing? 

    Thanks!

    ABC

    Wednesday, February 16, 2011 7:53 PM

Answers

  • Memory Limits for Windows Releases

    Memory and Address Space Limits

    The following table specifies the limits on memory and address space for supported releases of Windows. Unless otherwise noted, the limits in this table apply to all supported releases.

    Memory type Limit in on X86 Limit in 64-bit Windows

    User-mode virtual address space for each 32-bit process

    2 GB

    Up to 3 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE and 4GT

    2 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE cleared (default)

    4 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE set


    So by default, the app still gets 2GB. To get it using 4GB, the app must be compiled with the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE flag set.

    André

    Source:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778%28VS.85%29.aspx
    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    • Proposed as answer by Andre.Ziegler Wednesday, February 16, 2011 9:55 PM
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Tuesday, February 22, 2011 7:41 AM
    Wednesday, February 16, 2011 9:55 PM

All replies

  • Memory Limits for Windows Releases

    Memory and Address Space Limits

    The following table specifies the limits on memory and address space for supported releases of Windows. Unless otherwise noted, the limits in this table apply to all supported releases.

    Memory type Limit in on X86 Limit in 64-bit Windows

    User-mode virtual address space for each 32-bit process

    2 GB

    Up to 3 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE and 4GT

    2 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE cleared (default)

    4 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE set


    So by default, the app still gets 2GB. To get it using 4GB, the app must be compiled with the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE flag set.

    André

    Source:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778%28VS.85%29.aspx
    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    • Proposed as answer by Andre.Ziegler Wednesday, February 16, 2011 9:55 PM
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Tuesday, February 22, 2011 7:41 AM
    Wednesday, February 16, 2011 9:55 PM
  • Thank you, André.

    So, most likely, Premiere Elements 9 can only utilize 2 GB of RAM.  Does PE9 take all 2 GB for its own use or can any other app or service claim some of that RAM?  I ask because many people have offered ideas to reduce the overhead to give PE9 all the available RAM (stop antivirus scanners, check services for unneeded processes, etc.).  If PE9 gets all 2 GB to itself, there appears to be no action that can improve the situation other than wait for Adobe to come out with a 64-bit version.

    Thanks!

    ABC

    Sunday, February 27, 2011 7:19 PM
  • Windows uses Virtual RAM, this has nothing to do how much physical RAM you have.

    You can try this tool:

    http://ntcore.com/4gb_patch.php

    this sets the flag in the EXE Header. So try if this works.


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Monday, February 28, 2011 1:56 PM
  • Again, thank you, André.

    But, to no avail.  I tried the patch and ran PE9 and got exactly the same results.  I guess it just can't handle the resolution and framerate of my video in the desired format within the memory space given it.

    Question though.  I understand that virtual RAM is used for 32-bit apps running on a 64-bit OS, but doesn't that virtual RAM map, at some point, to real RAM?  So the greater the physical RAM, the greater the number of 32-bit apps you can run simultaneously?  Yes? 

    Thanks!

    ABC

    Tuesday, March 1, 2011 8:15 PM