locked
Distribution points and boundary groups query RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a client who has a head office with about 800 laptops, and about 50 smaller sites of about 4-6 laptops at each site. The smaller sites have no server infrastructure apart from a NAS at each of these smaller sites. The link from the head office to the primary sites aren't fantastic so i am trying work out a way for these remote sites to install applications without flooding the link. They cant install servers at the remote sites and arent overly keen on the idea of using a Windows 7 OS as a distribution point. I saw this post and was wondering how doing something like that with the NAS will work. http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/configmanagerdeployment/thread/1fa459f4-2e16-4dfb-b7af-b2da29c4f4f7

    Wouldnt clients still pull the content down over the link from our DP and not the NAS i.e. it would use the network connection to the DP at the home office and not the NAS connection at the local site?

    Can anyone suggest any options? Could i set 3 boundary groups? One for site assignment, and the other two for content location? Making the connection fast for one and slow for the other so that the slow connection downloads content before running it where as the fast connection will run it direct from the DP? Is my understanding correct? Or would bits throttling be a better option?

    And just a question on bits, if i disable the BITs setting on the client settings, is BITs still used to recommence a download if the connection is interrupted?


    • Edited by alokin123 Friday, October 5, 2012 3:38 AM another question
    Friday, October 5, 2012 3:25 AM

Answers

  • Using a NAS at each remote to store package source wouldn't help you in this situation at all. The client will download the content using bits at the remote site from the Home Office DP this would throttle the connection since it's on the slow link (You should need to setup any special boundaries for content location). Since you can't put in a server or use a client OS as a DP this is really your only option.

    Justin | http://patchmypc.net | Please remember to mark as helpful/answer if this helped you


    Friday, October 5, 2012 12:30 PM
  • Another option would be using 3rd party tools (for example 1E Nomad or Adaptiva Onesite).

    Torsten Meringer | http://www.mssccmfaq.de

    • Proposed as answer by TorstenMMVP Friday, October 5, 2012 12:56 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by TorstenMMVP Friday, October 5, 2012 12:56 PM
    • Marked as answer by alokin123 Sunday, October 7, 2012 8:21 PM
    Friday, October 5, 2012 12:55 PM
  • Which traffic? DP to Client? BITS.

    Unless you specifically set a package to run from a DP, all content is downloaded using BITS which is partially self-throttling and you can manually throttle using group policy or the client settings. Also note, that only packages can be set to run from DP -- all other content types including Applications and software updates are download and execute only.

    Disabling BITS throttling in the client settings does not disable the use of BITS and its inherent self-throttling capabilities -- which admittedly aren't perfect.

    Note that you could still use slow boundaries -- this has nothing to do with the number of DPs. Each boundary is individually set as slow or fast. I'm not exactly sure how that would really help though.

    Microsoft (and third-parties) have provided multiple options -- I'm not sure what the customer expects -- content must flow and must use the WAN. It's not magic. If they are not willing to adopt one of these, then they will have to deal with increased WAN usage.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com

    • Marked as answer by alokin123 Sunday, October 7, 2012 8:21 PM
    Saturday, October 6, 2012 3:58 PM

All replies

  • Using a NAS at each remote to store package source wouldn't help you in this situation at all. The client will download the content using bits at the remote site from the Home Office DP this would throttle the connection since it's on the slow link (You should need to setup any special boundaries for content location). Since you can't put in a server or use a client OS as a DP this is really your only option.

    Justin | http://patchmypc.net | Please remember to mark as helpful/answer if this helped you


    Friday, October 5, 2012 12:30 PM
  • Another option would be using 3rd party tools (for example 1E Nomad or Adaptiva Onesite).

    Torsten Meringer | http://www.mssccmfaq.de

    • Proposed as answer by TorstenMMVP Friday, October 5, 2012 12:56 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by TorstenMMVP Friday, October 5, 2012 12:56 PM
    • Marked as answer by alokin123 Sunday, October 7, 2012 8:21 PM
    Friday, October 5, 2012 12:55 PM
  • If all of your clients are Win 7 Enterprise, then you can use BranchCache. It's not as robust of a solution as those that Torsten mentioned, but it still can work pretty well.

    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com

    Friday, October 5, 2012 1:59 PM
  • thanks for the tips.

    So if the 3rd party tools arent an option and the branchcache isnt an option, and i cant use a slow boundary (i only have one DP) is there nothing i can do to limit the traffic? 

    Saturday, October 6, 2012 8:42 AM
  • Which traffic? DP to Client? BITS.

    Unless you specifically set a package to run from a DP, all content is downloaded using BITS which is partially self-throttling and you can manually throttle using group policy or the client settings. Also note, that only packages can be set to run from DP -- all other content types including Applications and software updates are download and execute only.

    Disabling BITS throttling in the client settings does not disable the use of BITS and its inherent self-throttling capabilities -- which admittedly aren't perfect.

    Note that you could still use slow boundaries -- this has nothing to do with the number of DPs. Each boundary is individually set as slow or fast. I'm not exactly sure how that would really help though.

    Microsoft (and third-parties) have provided multiple options -- I'm not sure what the customer expects -- content must flow and must use the WAN. It's not magic. If they are not willing to adopt one of these, then they will have to deal with increased WAN usage.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com

    • Marked as answer by alokin123 Sunday, October 7, 2012 8:21 PM
    Saturday, October 6, 2012 3:58 PM