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How to open mpp in client application and not in browser (MS Project 2010, Windows 7, IE 8) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I have a website that has links to mpp files.
    If I click on them, MS Project Professional 2010 opens, it seems to load the file, but it doesn't display the file.
    In the back I have a popup window from IE8 open, that points to the mpp file.

    I had this same behavior on Windows XP in the past, and there I solved it by unchecking "browse in same window" in the file type properties of the .mpp file type.

    In Windows 7 I cannot find these properties (same as many people if I google this).
    I find some info from Microsoft to change the registry, but none of it works, I keep the exact same behavior.

    So I can't work in mpp files anymore when they're linked from a webpage, and when I'm using Windows 7. It doesn't show me the file contents in MS Project 2010, and not in the browser popup window. Just great...

    How can I force the mpp file to open in MS Project 2010, and not in the browser?

    Thanks in advance!


    • Edited by kurtvd Monday, July 30, 2012 2:25 PM
    Monday, July 30, 2012 2:25 PM

Answers

  • http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/c6d03c14-8b67-4f54-88fc-8428e860a401

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/cd5bc16b-ee20-4e93-abb7-2b910cff43ba

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/63e9c777-1256-4241-8f9f-c2acbc6e0bb2

    (plus others if you search "RMSchneider SharePoint"

    In summary: We use SharePoint for storage and version control. Works great. All the work is done on check out copies loaded from the same named location on local disks, e.g. c:\data\project\projectA\*.mpp.   We also keep the global.mpp in the same folder, and we set the "start-in" folder for Project to be that folder. All works fine, Project doesn't get confused, we have control over versions.  You can use this same technique even storing files elsewhere... SharePoint not required.  If I didn't have SharePoint for this, I'd probably use a source code version control system, e.g. SVS, CVN, or something (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_revision_control_software). You can use your web site if you need to; but you'll not have versioning and checkout.  Versioning and checkout is the most important part of a collaborative system, IMHO.


    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    • Proposed as answer by Ismet Kocaman Wednesday, August 1, 2012 9:00 AM
    • Marked as answer by kurtvd Wednesday, August 1, 2012 11:16 AM
    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 8:26 AM
  • Project User,

    You're right, we had a similar discussion on this, but back then we were on a Windows XP environment.
    We're planning a migration to Windows 7 in September, so we're currently testing our applications and we hit this problem.

    I've checked the links you gave, and clicked through from there to other posts.
    I was able to find a solution that works for us, by adding a registry hack.

    Basically this is what we need to do in order to be able to open an mpp file through a website link:

    - Install Microsoft Project Professional 2010. (same as for windows XP)
    - Install Service Pack 1 for MS Project Professional 2010, 32-bit or 64-bit version. (same as for windows XP)
    - Apply the registry hack below (same result as for windows XP but through a backdoor...)

    Registry hack to fix the "open mpp from a webpage link" problem in windows 7:
    - Go to start menu
    - Type "regedit" (without quotes) in the search/run textbox, press enter.
    - In the Registry Editor, navigate to this location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\MSProject.Project.9
    - Right click in the window on the right, click New > DWORD (32-bit) Value
    - Name it "BrowserFlags" (without quotes)
    - Give it a decimal value "8" (without quotes)
    - Reboot PC to apply changes (not sure if really needed, but doesn't do any harm)

    What this does is configure the "browse in same window" (clearing the checkbox in a windows XP world), but through the registry, since the file type settings window doesn't exist anymore since Vista.

    So nice of Microsoft to remove functionality on each new version they release...
    I hope this will save other users a lot of time and banging their head against the wall.

    • Marked as answer by kurtvd Wednesday, August 1, 2012 7:54 AM
    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 7:53 AM

All replies

  • To do what you are doing requires Project to use the HTTP protocol.  Project is not very good at that.  It is not considered a good practice to do what you are doing.  

    Recommend you download the file (in IE or any browser, right mouse lick on link, save as), then open the file from the local downloaded location.  Then when done, upload the file using IE (or any browser) from the local location back up to the web server.

    If you have sub-projects or shared resource files, even the above is not good enough.  You need to keep and work on all files in the local file system always in the same place, so that Project "thinks" all liked files are from the same unchanging place, e.g. c:\data\project or \\servername\sharename\data\project.  Doing that, and doing it all the time, significantly reduces the risk of file corruption caused by Project getting confused about linked file locations.  However, you don't mention linked files so this might not be applicable.  But I thought I would mention anyway.


    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    Monday, July 30, 2012 3:30 PM
  • Hi Rob,

    Thanks for your reply.
    In fact we do use linked projects on some of our mpp files.
    What we want to achieve is that our users can collaborate on the mpp files through a common interface, our intranet website. That means that an approach where users should download the mpp and then reupload it, will result in editing conflicts.

    Does that mean that our setup (providing access to mpp files through a web interface) is a bad practice?

    What other options do we have to achieve this goal?

    Tuesday, July 31, 2012 6:44 AM
  • Hello Rob,

    You can save entire project as Image (JPG/PNG) and upload. So User can download and will allow user to view your project in IE browser as well. At the same time, editing is not allowed so no edit conflict.

    Thanks,

    Rakesh

    Tuesday, July 31, 2012 10:55 AM
  • Rakesh,

    And how will users be able to collaborate on the mpp files then?

    Tuesday, July 31, 2012 11:15 AM
  • I've written many times in this forum how to do exactly that. Sorry, but at this moment I don't have time to write it again. Perhaps go back and search the past discussions.

    I also saw a posting (within the last week or so) where someone documented how to use the subst command to make it work even better.  

    When I get some time, I'll write up something and post on my blog.


    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    Tuesday, July 31, 2012 11:19 AM
  • Rob,

    I did search the forums, but was unable to find relevant posts on this.
    Can you add links to the post that you are referring to?

    Tuesday, July 31, 2012 1:43 PM
  • Hello Kurtvd,

    As I recall we had a similar discussion some while ago but I guess this time it is with Windows 7. 

    Pls see this external link: http://superuser.com/questions/109733/where-is-browse-in-same-window-in-windows-7

    I would also suggest you post the question here at: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7?tab=all 

    And please provide us feedback on your progress. 

    Regards.


    Tuesday, July 31, 2012 2:50 PM
  • Project User,

    You're right, we had a similar discussion on this, but back then we were on a Windows XP environment.
    We're planning a migration to Windows 7 in September, so we're currently testing our applications and we hit this problem.

    I've checked the links you gave, and clicked through from there to other posts.
    I was able to find a solution that works for us, by adding a registry hack.

    Basically this is what we need to do in order to be able to open an mpp file through a website link:

    - Install Microsoft Project Professional 2010. (same as for windows XP)
    - Install Service Pack 1 for MS Project Professional 2010, 32-bit or 64-bit version. (same as for windows XP)
    - Apply the registry hack below (same result as for windows XP but through a backdoor...)

    Registry hack to fix the "open mpp from a webpage link" problem in windows 7:
    - Go to start menu
    - Type "regedit" (without quotes) in the search/run textbox, press enter.
    - In the Registry Editor, navigate to this location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\MSProject.Project.9
    - Right click in the window on the right, click New > DWORD (32-bit) Value
    - Name it "BrowserFlags" (without quotes)
    - Give it a decimal value "8" (without quotes)
    - Reboot PC to apply changes (not sure if really needed, but doesn't do any harm)

    What this does is configure the "browse in same window" (clearing the checkbox in a windows XP world), but through the registry, since the file type settings window doesn't exist anymore since Vista.

    So nice of Microsoft to remove functionality on each new version they release...
    I hope this will save other users a lot of time and banging their head against the wall.

    • Marked as answer by kurtvd Wednesday, August 1, 2012 7:54 AM
    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 7:53 AM
  • http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/c6d03c14-8b67-4f54-88fc-8428e860a401

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/cd5bc16b-ee20-4e93-abb7-2b910cff43ba

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/63e9c777-1256-4241-8f9f-c2acbc6e0bb2

    (plus others if you search "RMSchneider SharePoint"

    In summary: We use SharePoint for storage and version control. Works great. All the work is done on check out copies loaded from the same named location on local disks, e.g. c:\data\project\projectA\*.mpp.   We also keep the global.mpp in the same folder, and we set the "start-in" folder for Project to be that folder. All works fine, Project doesn't get confused, we have control over versions.  You can use this same technique even storing files elsewhere... SharePoint not required.  If I didn't have SharePoint for this, I'd probably use a source code version control system, e.g. SVS, CVN, or something (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_revision_control_software). You can use your web site if you need to; but you'll not have versioning and checkout.  Versioning and checkout is the most important part of a collaborative system, IMHO.


    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    • Proposed as answer by Ismet Kocaman Wednesday, August 1, 2012 9:00 AM
    • Marked as answer by kurtvd Wednesday, August 1, 2012 11:16 AM
    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 8:26 AM
  • http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/c6d03c14-8b67-4f54-88fc-8428e860a401

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/cd5bc16b-ee20-4e93-abb7-2b910cff43ba

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/projectprofessional2010general/thread/63e9c777-1256-4241-8f9f-c2acbc6e0bb2

    (plus others if you search "RMSchneider SharePoint"

    In summary: We use SharePoint for storage and version control. Works great. All the work is done on check out copies loaded from the same named location on local disks, e.g. c:\data\project\projectA\*.mpp.   We also keep the global.mpp in the same folder, and we set the "start-in" folder for Project to be that folder. All works fine, Project doesn't get confused, we have control over versions.  You can use this same technique even storing files elsewhere... SharePoint not required.  If I didn't have SharePoint for this, I'd probably use a source code version control system, e.g. SVS, CVN, or something (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_revision_control_software). You can use your web site if you need to; but you'll not have versioning and checkout.  Versioning and checkout is the most important part of a collaborative system, IMHO.


    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    Thank you Rob, for sharing invaluable information, especially on version control. 
    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 10:28 AM
  • Thanks Rob,

    Versioning control is another aspect that we're looking for, which we currently don't have today.
    Your approach with SharePoint sounds nice, and we'll try it out.
    I'm only not sure if we will be able to educate our users to follow the approach you describe.
    They tend to be stubborn, and then expect us to fix their mess, so we prefer a "fool-proof" approach, even if it's not the most perfect one.

    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 11:16 AM
  • My approach, while may be perceived as "hard", is that if the people using Project properly (which is no mean feat), can't understand or use Version Control, check out/in, etc. ... then they aren't qualified/intelligent-enough to join my team and work with us.  You can't ignore version control even if you don't use a tool. If you use a tool, version control becomes easier; if you don't use a tool then it's done randomly and then you have chaos. But it is self-inflected.  I prefer not to cause or allow  chaos deliberately. Dealing with chaos that comes out of the blue on projects is hard enough, so I do all I can to eliminate self-inflicted chaos.

    --rms www.rmschneider.com


    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 12:51 PM
  • I completely agree with you, but unfortunately it's not a vision that I can force upon the management on my end.

    If it were up me, I would retract a lot of users permissions, because they are clearly not capable of working with IT tools, and I'm sure most of them wouldn't even mind to lose permissions :)

    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 12:56 PM
  • Helps to be in charge.  meantime, work on the management.

    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 1:01 PM
  • Project User,

    You're right, we had a similar discussion on this, but back then we were on a Windows XP environment.
    We're planning a migration to Windows 7 in September, so we're currently testing our applications and we hit this problem.

    I've checked the links you gave, and clicked through from there to other posts.
    I was able to find a solution that works for us, by adding a registry hack.

    Basically this is what we need to do in order to be able to open an mpp file through a website link:

    - Install Microsoft Project Professional 2010. (same as for windows XP)
    - Install Service Pack 1 for MS Project Professional 2010, 32-bit or 64-bit version. (same as for windows XP)
    - Apply the registry hack below (same result as for windows XP but through a backdoor...)

    Registry hack to fix the "open mpp from a webpage link" problem in windows 7:
    - Go to start menu
    - Type "regedit" (without quotes) in the search/run textbox, press enter.
    - In the Registry Editor, navigate to this location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\MSProject.Project.9
    - Right click in the window on the right, click New > DWORD (32-bit) Value
    - Name it "BrowserFlags" (without quotes)
    - Give it a decimal value "8" (without quotes)
    - Reboot PC to apply changes (not sure if really needed, but doesn't do any harm)

    What this does is configure the "browse in same window" (clearing the checkbox in a windows XP world), but through the registry, since the file type settings window doesn't exist anymore since Vista.

    So nice of Microsoft to remove functionality on each new version they release...
    I hope this will save other users a lot of time and banging their head against the wall.

    Hello Kurtvd,

    Thank you for the feedback. I'm glad you've solved the issue. Pls mark my post as "answer" if you think it is helpful. 

    Regards.

    Wednesday, August 1, 2012 3:02 PM