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Dual Boot Vista & Win2008 RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

     

    I would like to replace my Win2003 with Win2008.

    My system has a disk 0 with 2 Partitions, in the first partition (C: ) with Vista32, the other partition is used for some data (E: )

     

    On disk 1 (D: ) Win2003 is installed.

    Both disk have a primary partition.

     

    When I start the setup and choose disk 1 for the destination, Win 2008 is installed succesfully.

     

    My problem is now, that after the first reboot and login, drive D: is now shown as drive C: in Win2008.

     

    How I can avoid, that my drive D: change to  C: ?

    I have tried to start the setup within Vista, but it's not allowed.

     

    BTW: I can still boot Vista on disk 0.

     

     

     

    Thanks

    Eric

    Thursday, April 10, 2008 9:13 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    I obtain the same result as you did from my tests.  

     

    <1>:

    The installation is launched from media and built the dual boot of Windows Vista and Windows server 2003 . I install Windows Vista on partition C and Windows server 2003 on partition D.

     

    Result:

     

    Vista is assigned drive C and Windows server 2003 is assigned drive D, no matter which system I log in.

     

    <2>:

    The installation is launched from media and built the dual boot of Windows vista and Windows server 2008. I install Windows Vista on partition C and Windows server 2008 on partition D.

     

    Result:

     

    The boot partition of Windows Server 2008 is assigned as letter C when logging into Windows Server 2008, while when logging into Windows Vista the boot partition of Windows Vista is assigned as letter C.

     

    Conclusion:

    ========

     

    Windows server 2008 and Vista have the different behavior to handle dual boot scenario with program compatibility concerns. For example, For some legacy programs, they may use "C:\" instead of "%systemdrive%". They always assign boot partition as letter C rather than the mechanism in prior Windows systems.

     

    Furthermore, based on my test, we couldn't modify the boot partition letter either in disk manager console or registry.

     

    More information:

    ===========

     

    On upgrades, drive letters are persistent. Partition information is retained in special files containing a $DRVLTR$ tag, placed by Setup in the root of each drive.

     

    In dual-boot installations, the drive letter for Windows Vista is dependent on how the installation was performed. If the installation is started from within a down-level client, the drive letter(s) for the down-level operating system are maintained. For example, if Windows Vista is installed to an empty D:\ partition from within a Windows XP installation on C:\Windows, the Windows XP installation is still the C:\Windows directory when booted into Windows Vista and the Windows Vista installation is D:\Windows.

     

    If the installation is launched from media however, the Windows Vista installation is to the C:\ drive and other volumes are assigned new drive letters. For example, if Windows XP is installed to C:\Windows and Windows Vista is then installed to a formatted D:\ partition, when booted into Windows Vista the installed drive for Windows Vista is C:\ and the Windows XP installation uses a different drive letter (most likely D:\ in this example). If booted into the down-level operating system, the original drive letter would return; Windows XP would be installed to C:\Windows, and Windows Vista to D:\Windows.

     

    I believe windows server 2008 has the same behavior as Windows Vista.

     

    I hope this helps.

     

     

    Best wishes

    --------------
    Morgan Che

     

    Wednesday, April 16, 2008 10:33 AM

All replies

  •  

    No answers or ideas?

     

    First one who had this problem?

     

    Win2008 is booted via D: (in boot.ini) and afterwards it has changed drive to C: (after booting) ?

    Saturday, April 12, 2008 10:36 PM
  • Hello,

     

    This is an expected behavior.

     

    Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 (disk manager) assign drive letters in two ways. You will see that the boot partition of Windows Server 2008 is assigned letter C when you log into Windows Server 2008, while when you log into Windows Vista you will see the boot partition of Windows Vista is assigned letter C.

     

    Both Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista work well with this. Besides, most of applications work well with this, and for some legacy applications that use "C:" instead of "%systemdrive%".

      

    Best wishes

     

    Morgan

     

     

     

    Tuesday, April 15, 2008 10:29 AM
  • Sorry, do you mean that there's not other way?

    Before I had Vista and Win2003 in dual boot. Vista had drive C: and Win2003 had D:

    Now I have Vista drive C: and Win2008 also drive C:.

    with win2008 I can't have same behavior?

    Thanks

    Tuesday, April 15, 2008 7:14 PM
  • Hi,

     

    I obtain the same result as you did from my tests.  

     

    <1>:

    The installation is launched from media and built the dual boot of Windows Vista and Windows server 2003 . I install Windows Vista on partition C and Windows server 2003 on partition D.

     

    Result:

     

    Vista is assigned drive C and Windows server 2003 is assigned drive D, no matter which system I log in.

     

    <2>:

    The installation is launched from media and built the dual boot of Windows vista and Windows server 2008. I install Windows Vista on partition C and Windows server 2008 on partition D.

     

    Result:

     

    The boot partition of Windows Server 2008 is assigned as letter C when logging into Windows Server 2008, while when logging into Windows Vista the boot partition of Windows Vista is assigned as letter C.

     

    Conclusion:

    ========

     

    Windows server 2008 and Vista have the different behavior to handle dual boot scenario with program compatibility concerns. For example, For some legacy programs, they may use "C:\" instead of "%systemdrive%". They always assign boot partition as letter C rather than the mechanism in prior Windows systems.

     

    Furthermore, based on my test, we couldn't modify the boot partition letter either in disk manager console or registry.

     

    More information:

    ===========

     

    On upgrades, drive letters are persistent. Partition information is retained in special files containing a $DRVLTR$ tag, placed by Setup in the root of each drive.

     

    In dual-boot installations, the drive letter for Windows Vista is dependent on how the installation was performed. If the installation is started from within a down-level client, the drive letter(s) for the down-level operating system are maintained. For example, if Windows Vista is installed to an empty D:\ partition from within a Windows XP installation on C:\Windows, the Windows XP installation is still the C:\Windows directory when booted into Windows Vista and the Windows Vista installation is D:\Windows.

     

    If the installation is launched from media however, the Windows Vista installation is to the C:\ drive and other volumes are assigned new drive letters. For example, if Windows XP is installed to C:\Windows and Windows Vista is then installed to a formatted D:\ partition, when booted into Windows Vista the installed drive for Windows Vista is C:\ and the Windows XP installation uses a different drive letter (most likely D:\ in this example). If booted into the down-level operating system, the original drive letter would return; Windows XP would be installed to C:\Windows, and Windows Vista to D:\Windows.

     

    I believe windows server 2008 has the same behavior as Windows Vista.

     

    I hope this helps.

     

     

    Best wishes

    --------------
    Morgan Che

     

    Wednesday, April 16, 2008 10:33 AM
  • Morgan Che-MSFT said:

    Hello,

     

    This is an expected behavior.

     

    Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 (disk manager) assign drive letters in two ways. You will see that the boot partition of Windows Server 2008 is assigned letter C when you log into Windows Server 2008, while when you log into Windows Vista you will see the boot partition of Windows Vista is assigned letter C.

     

    Both Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista work well with this. Besides, most of applications work well with this, and for some legacy applications that use "C:" instead of "%systemdrive%".

      

    Best wishes

     

    Morgan

     Mr Che:

    I'm considering creating a dual boot OS on a single HD.  I'm currently running Vista Home Basic SP1, Toshiba SatelliteA135 notebook, 2Mg RAM, 180 Gb HD.  If I use the Microsoft Shrink Basic Volume out of Disk Management, can I later delete the new partition and Expand (Unshrink) my original partiton back to its full capacity?

    I'm looking to try the Windows 7 beta on the new partiton.  Will it also default to "C" as does Vista and is this really a problem?

    Thanks in advance for any advice you may be able to offer.

    Respectfully yours,

     

     

     



    Mr
    Robert Goltz Please, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.
    Saturday, January 24, 2009 1:17 AM