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Windows 7 Pro 64 major slow down RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've been experiencing major slow down of my system and can't figure out why. Here are some details:

    Computer is a HP Pavilion Core i7 Q 720 @ 1.6 ghz  with 8gb ram

    I'm using Performance Test to benchmark the system in different states

    My baseline is Win7 Diagnostic mode (no services, no startups) - let's say that is 100% (quite fast)

    Running only windows services and Eset - it drops to about 60%

    But then when I'm working running several MS Office apps, Firefox, Skype and a few smaller programs, it drops to 5%!! Quite noticeably and frustratingly slow for what is supposed to be a very speedy computer.

    The CPU usage is not high, memory is fine. But it is just SLOW.

    Any suggestions how I can diagnose this further?

    Monday, March 7, 2011 3:22 PM

Answers

  • Hi Steve,

    Have you been able to view if any processes are using up a lot of additional memory/CPU resources You can view this in Windows Task Manager (Ctrl+Shift+Esc > processes tab, then arrange by CPU usage). If you cannot get enough info from the 'processes' tab you might try process explorer, it might give you a better indication as to which processes exactly are slowing you down.You can find it here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.

    Hope that helps,

    Cathal

     

     


    Cathal O'Brien BSc, PgDip, PhD www.techsmart.ie
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Tuesday, March 15, 2011 3:09 AM
    Monday, March 7, 2011 10:01 PM

All replies

  • what in detail is slow? Only a benchmark tool or do you see the slowness in daily usage?
    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Want to install RSAT on Windows 7 Sp1? Check my HowTo: http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=150221
    Monday, March 7, 2011 7:57 PM
  • Hi Steve,

    Have you been able to view if any processes are using up a lot of additional memory/CPU resources You can view this in Windows Task Manager (Ctrl+Shift+Esc > processes tab, then arrange by CPU usage). If you cannot get enough info from the 'processes' tab you might try process explorer, it might give you a better indication as to which processes exactly are slowing you down.You can find it here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.

    Hope that helps,

    Cathal

     

     


    Cathal O'Brien BSc, PgDip, PhD www.techsmart.ie
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Tuesday, March 15, 2011 3:09 AM
    Monday, March 7, 2011 10:01 PM
  • 1. Windows 7 only uses one core to boot out of the box. By changing the number of cores used you can reduce the boot time:

    STEP 1. Click on Start and then Run
    STEP 2. Search for Run and type msconfig
    STEP 3. Click on the tab Boot and click on Advanced options
    STEP 4. Check Number of processors and enter how many your computer has (usually 2,4 or 8)
    STEP 5. Click OK and Apply
    STEP 6. Reboot the system.

    2. Turning off the Minimize-Maximize animation can make your system faster.

    STEP 1. Go to Start and type in SystemPropertiesPerformance.

    STEP 2. Go the Visual Effects tab.

    STEP 3. Untick Animate windows when minimizing and maximizing and click OK.

    3. Fonts, especially TrueType fonts, use lots of system resources. For maximum performance, trim your fonts down to just those that you need to use on a daily basis and fonts that applications may require.

    STEP 1. Open Control Panel.

    STEP 2. Open Fonts folder.

    STEP 3. Move fonts you don’t need to a temporary directory (e.g. C:FONTBKUP?) just in case you. need or want to bring a few of them back. The more fonts you uninstall, the more system resources you will increase.

    4. Windows 7 shutdowns quite faster than Windows Vista or Windows XP, but it can be improved further by making this registry change which reduced the time Windows waits to kill processes:

    STEP 1. Click on Start and type in regedit and press Enter.

    STEP 2. Move to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControl.

    STEP 3. Right-click on WaitToKillServiceTimeOut and change and lower the value.

    STEP 4. The default is 12000 (12 seconds) but you can lower this to any number .

    STEP 5. Click OK and reboot machine.

    5. If you know where your data are stored, and seldom do a file search,  then the Search Indexing feature is a total waste of time. It uses up quite a lot of resources and is one feature We’d recommend most users disabling:

    STEP 1. Click on Start and type in services.msc

    STEP 2. Find and right-click Windows Search

    STEP 2. In the startup type field choose Disabled

    6. Many applications start automatically or start components with Windows, which will slow your bootup times and consume unnecessary resources. These include programs such as Acrobat, Quicktime, iTunes, Java etc. To stop these programs autostarting:

    STEP 1. Go to Start and enter msconfig

    STEP 2. Click on the startup tab and uncheck anything you are certain you don’t need e.g. don’t untick your Anti-Virus program.

    7. Some Windows 7 services use a lot of unnecessary memory, which is particularly bad if you don’t use them. Instead of disabling services, we recommend that you set services you don’t think you need to manual just in case you make a mistake.

    STEP 1. Go to Control Panel. Click on Administrative Tools and then click on Services.

    STEP 2. Right click on each individual service you want to disable.
    Windows 7
    Tuesday, March 8, 2011 6:56 AM
  • I have a similar issue. I am running Windows 7 Enterprise 64 bit which quad boots with Windows 7 Ultimate 32, XP Pro and Vista 32 Ultimate. The box is a quad core 3 GHZ with 8 gb of ram. All operating systems are fully patched and up to date. On 7 Enterprise 64 bit SP1 the system has become sluggish. It takes a few secouns to open windows and run programs, there is a noticeable lag. Explorer.exe is running constantly at 25%. On the 32 bit systems explorer only shows up every so often and the cpu usage of the cores is 3% max when idling. I am currently scanning for a virus but as yet have not found anything.
    Wednesday, March 16, 2011 5:40 PM
  • Hi Martin,

    Let us know how you get on iwth the virus scan. I know that some computer exploits can hide in explorer so it may be the cause. You could also try the 'poor mans' malware check and examine whether your routers access lights are constantly on even if you are not  using any network programs yourself.

    Cheers,

    Cathal


    Cathal O'Brien BSc, PgDip, PhD . TechSmart Computer Repair
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 9:12 AM
  • Turned out the issue was caused by Classic Shell start menu having the icons cached. Once that box was unchecked all returned to normal. Since then I have wiped and completly rebuilt the 64 bit windows 7 installation and have installed the latest version of classic shell and the problem has disappeared completely.
    Sunday, February 26, 2012 6:13 PM