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Windows 2008 R2 vs Windows 7 - snappier RRS feed

  • Question

  • Wow, Windows 2008 R2 seems a lot snappier than Windows 7.  Is there an easy way to setup Windows 7 like this?

     


    Friday, June 3, 2011 9:18 PM

Answers

  • Windows 7 is a client O/S.  It runs many services that enhance your computing experience that servers do not.  Server O/S's are designed to run "server" programs, and are mainly service-oriented.

    Therefore, Server 2008, "out of the box", will seem a lot faster, because it doesn't have all the fancy graphical features of Win7, and it's running far fewer services.

    Also, it is very difficult to find drivers for Server O/S's for common consumer hardware like bluetooth devices, etc.  So, Server 2008 I do not recommend as a Client O/S!

    • Proposed as answer by Bigteddy Tuesday, June 7, 2011 8:36 AM
    • Marked as answer by Juke Chou Friday, June 17, 2011 9:40 AM
    Friday, June 3, 2011 9:27 PM
  • Hi,

    If you really want to use the Windows server 2008 R2, I would like to advise that the audio is disabled by default.

    I also do not recommend to use it as a client OS.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    • Marked as answer by Juke Chou Friday, June 17, 2011 9:40 AM
    Tuesday, June 7, 2011 8:18 AM
  • For a "snappy" Windows 7 experience, in System Properties.Advanced,
    goto Visual Effects, select Custom.

    Turn OFF Animate Windows when minimizing and maximizing.

    See also in the same list, Aero Peek, fading, sliding, smooth-scrolling.
    Add/Remove to taste.

    • Proposed as answer by Bigteddy Saturday, June 11, 2011 6:20 AM
    • Marked as answer by Juke Chou Friday, June 17, 2011 9:40 AM
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 4:43 AM

All replies

  • Windows 7 is a client O/S.  It runs many services that enhance your computing experience that servers do not.  Server O/S's are designed to run "server" programs, and are mainly service-oriented.

    Therefore, Server 2008, "out of the box", will seem a lot faster, because it doesn't have all the fancy graphical features of Win7, and it's running far fewer services.

    Also, it is very difficult to find drivers for Server O/S's for common consumer hardware like bluetooth devices, etc.  So, Server 2008 I do not recommend as a Client O/S!

    • Proposed as answer by Bigteddy Tuesday, June 7, 2011 8:36 AM
    • Marked as answer by Juke Chou Friday, June 17, 2011 9:40 AM
    Friday, June 3, 2011 9:27 PM
  • I found it interesting that windows 2008 R2 also got rid of the whole fetch/superfetch/readyboot system and windows search, it seems just fine without it.  I can't get rid of windows defender and audio, although I can live without the multimedia class scheduler.

     

     

    Saturday, June 4, 2011 2:15 PM
  • Hi,

    If you really want to use the Windows server 2008 R2, I would like to advise that the audio is disabled by default.

    I also do not recommend to use it as a client OS.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    • Marked as answer by Juke Chou Friday, June 17, 2011 9:40 AM
    Tuesday, June 7, 2011 8:18 AM
  • For a "snappy" Windows 7 experience, in System Properties.Advanced,
    goto Visual Effects, select Custom.

    Turn OFF Animate Windows when minimizing and maximizing.

    See also in the same list, Aero Peek, fading, sliding, smooth-scrolling.
    Add/Remove to taste.

    • Proposed as answer by Bigteddy Saturday, June 11, 2011 6:20 AM
    • Marked as answer by Juke Chou Friday, June 17, 2011 9:40 AM
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 4:43 AM
  • Everyone always gives the same boring answer about running Windows Server 2008 R2 as a desktop and it gets the inquiring minds nowhere. I understand that it doesn't make a practical OS for the everyday user, but the everyday user wouldn't know how to configure it anyway, so for the sake of argument, let's just assume the "tech savvy" guys only want to use it as a desktop OS.  Below are some common concerns about running Server 2008 R2 as a desktop that I will address below.

     

    1. Anti-virus software

    Unfortunetely what you have heard is true. Many consumer-based AVs simply do not work with Windows Server 2008 R2. For the most part, the vendors have a Server-specific AV that wants to charge you oodles of dollars to run. The good thing is, however that Microsoft Security Essentials works flawlessly on Server 2008 R2, and its free, so if its anti-virus support you're looking for on Server, we've got you covered.

    2. Gaming Support

    From my personal experience, DirectX10/11 games run identical on 7/R2 due to the fact they share the same kernel. The compability list of supported games is quite high. I cannot guarantee delivery that all games will work fine. This is platform-specific and it depends how the developer coded the game. Some games will not work on Server at first, but by simply disabling DEP on the executable you can get the game to run, but this trick does not work for all games. For other games you can use the Application Verifier and Application Compatibility Toolkit provided Microsoft to trick the game into thinking your running Windows 7, but as I said before if the game is coded a certain way you are out of luck. One such example of a game that refuses to run is Lego Pirates of the Caribbean on PC. I was trying to get that game to work for my nephew on my R2 machine and hook up 360 controller so he could play but i forced to port that game to my Windows 7 dual boot configuration. Running a Server as a desktop OS isn't a problem for me because I can simply run a dual boot for the incompatible software. Most of the times I do not have to do this.

    3. Performance

    Without the proper configuration, software tweaks Windows Server 2008 R2 will feel very sluggish with all the Windows 7 visual effects/programs installed. If I did not perform any optimization techniques on R2 (installing superfetch, readyboost, boot optimization) my boot time would be lucky to hit 1:20. With the right features installed I was able to shrink my boot time on Windows Server 2008 R2 down to a mere 22 seconds on a normal startup configuration! No services or programs disabled with AV and Windows Update fully patched. If you do not have any clue on how to install these performance features (readyboost, superfetch, boot optimization) then R2 will not make a very good client OS. On the flip side once you configure these optimization technigues Windows Server 2008 R2 actually becomes a bit snappier due to the stripped features and reduced services that are not running on 7 (homegroup, media center, network sharing, p2p, etc). My fully configured Server 2008 R2 machine is using about 51 processes. When I was using Windows 7 in the past under the same mirrored configuration I was using 77 processes. Windows 7 was using 26 additional processes exclusive for networking/media services. Those background processes actually hindered my foregorund performance just a slight. Do not take it as a downgrade, Windows 7 was snappy as heck, but on R2 the same exact procedure is a little more snappier. It is hard to just read my review and take my word for it, you literally have to install, configure and optimize Windows Server 2008 R2 on your machine to feel the difference. You might not think there is a difference but there is. But of course the "feel" is going to be platform specific. A dual core processor with 2GB might not see any tangible gains while a quad core with 8gb would see noticable gains.

    4. What has been your biggest issues/problems with Windows Server 2008 R2?

    My biggest problem is I cannot guarantee that the newest piece of software or game title will work with Windows Server 2008 R2 even despite my best efforts to "hack" the game to work using various OS Versioning tricks. It is because of this problem that I am running Windows 7 in a dual boot configuration. For the most part I am not an extreme gamer and the majority of my tasks is college work (aka Microsoft Office Word). I do a lot of movie/video watching and I have not found any problems finding media codecs that work for Server so media playback is not a problem (for me atleast). I cannot stress enough that only advanced users implement Windows Server 2008 R2 as a desktop OS due to this underlying issue.

    5. Why Windows Server 2008 R2 over 7?

    Security hardening, minimalist by design, more management capabilities, lower hardware requirements, smaller initial footprint, remote capabilties, simplified backup solution, most programs/games work fine, hardware/driver compatibility is high, centralized monitoring, application load balancing, resource allocation capabilities, SharePoint development, virutalization capabilties, advanced file sharing, etc. There is actually a nice list of reasons to run Windows Server 2008 R2 as a desktop, the problem is the average user does not think about these things. If you don't utilize the potential of this operating system then my honest recommendation is Windows 7. They are both great operating systems. And both work well as desktop replacements. The decision is entirely based on preference, one does not have a significant lead on the other in terms of workstation capabilties.

     

    I hope my comprehensive review has given you a good idea about why you would or why not run Windows Server 2008 R2 as a desktop/client OS.

     

     

    • Proposed as answer by Chris Duran Saturday, March 28, 2020 5:27 PM
    Saturday, August 27, 2011 11:26 AM
  • Thanks!

     

    Saturday, August 27, 2011 12:02 PM
  • Join us over at the win2008workstation website to personally resolve some issues you might be having with the OS, if any. 
    Tuesday, August 30, 2011 4:54 AM