locked
Editing the dual boot entry names - BCDEDIT? RRS feed

  • Question

  •    If MS had intentionally gone out of their way to make something extremely difficult to understand, they could consider themselves a GREAT SUCCESS! :-) In the good old XP days you could go into the Control Panel System applet and simply edit the startup string to say whatever you wanted. After a considerable bit of self torture attempting to learn how to do the same thing with this "new improved" BCDEDIT, I'm coming here in the hopes somebody can offer a simple explanation.
    Since I have both the 32 and 64 bit versions of Win 7 installed in addition to XP, when I power up I see the following:
       "Earlier version of Windows"
       "Windows 7"
       "Windows 7"
    I wish to simply change the two "Windows 7" entries so that one says "Windows 7 - 32 bit edition" and the other says "Windows 7 - 64 bit edition".
       Now you have to admit that's a pretty simple thing to want to do. Why has MS gone so far out of its way to make something so simple so difficult? Years ago I had a chemistry prof who said "any idiot can make something complicated, it takes some smarts to make something simple". Doesn't MS have anybody with any smarts any more? :-( A good simple solution would be to put the Edit button back on that System startup applet, but I'd be more than happy to have a command line string to get the job done. TIA

    Friday, June 5, 2009 6:28 PM

Answers

  • I had the same want and did a Google search since BCDEDIT is also in Vista and works the same way.

    Here's the syntax:

    Change the description of the OS on the boot loader
    C:\bcdedit /set {current} description "Vista Home Premium 32bit"     [where {current} is the Identifier]

    I have two identifiers since I'm dual booting between Vista 64bit and Windows 7 64bit.

    Windows 7 is {current}
    Vista is{77da19a1-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f}

    C:\bcdedit /set {77da19a1-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f} description "Vista 64bit"
    C:\bcdedit /set {current} description "Windows 7 64bit"

    C:\bcdedit   <----- to check the descriptions after your updates.

    You can also download and install EasyBCD to do what you want with the descriptions.
    • Marked as answer by Hula_Baloo Friday, June 5, 2009 7:17 PM
    Friday, June 5, 2009 6:39 PM

All replies

  • I had the same want and did a Google search since BCDEDIT is also in Vista and works the same way.

    Here's the syntax:

    Change the description of the OS on the boot loader
    C:\bcdedit /set {current} description "Vista Home Premium 32bit"     [where {current} is the Identifier]

    I have two identifiers since I'm dual booting between Vista 64bit and Windows 7 64bit.

    Windows 7 is {current}
    Vista is{77da19a1-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f}

    C:\bcdedit /set {77da19a1-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f} description "Vista 64bit"
    C:\bcdedit /set {current} description "Windows 7 64bit"

    C:\bcdedit   <----- to check the descriptions after your updates.

    You can also download and install EasyBCD to do what you want with the descriptions.
    • Marked as answer by Hula_Baloo Friday, June 5, 2009 7:17 PM
    Friday, June 5, 2009 6:39 PM
  • Keith,
     Progress!  Thank you for your post.   I have TWO versions of Windows 7, so I'm unclear as to what I need to substitute where you have {current}.  Would I be interpreting this correctly that {current} would be the version of Windows I booted from?  If so, how would I go about finding out about the OTHER version?  Or maybe I have to boot one, change it's string with {current}, then do the same with the other version (i.e. 32 and 64 bit versions)?  Thanks again.
    • Proposed as answer by Tim CerlingMVP Monday, January 25, 2016 10:03 PM
    Friday, June 5, 2009 6:50 PM
  • Yes, {current} is what you currently boot into as your default. The others will be under the Windows Boot Loader headings. You can change both of your descriptions without booting into the other OS. You use the Identifiers to make changes to each entry in the boot loader.

    Do a C:\bcdedit at the command prompt and look at Windows Boot Manager section to find your default Identifier. Then each of the Windows Boot Loader sections for your other Identifiers. These will all be in the order of display that you see when you boot your system and pick an OS.

    Example using my 1st post:

    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier              {bootmgr}
    device                  partition=D:
    description             Windows Boot Manager
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {globalsettings}
    default                 {current}
    resumeobject            {95d361d0-3721-11de-8491-dc7d17534f65}
    displayorder            {current}
                            {77da19a1-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f}
    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}
    timeout                 15

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {current}
    device                  partition=C:
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.exe
    description             Windows 7 RC - 64bit
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence        {95d361d2-3721-11de-8491-dc7d17534f65}
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    osdevice                partition=C:
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {95d361d0-3721-11de-8491-dc7d17534f65}
    nx                      OptIn

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {77da19a1-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f}
    device                  partition=D:
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.exe
    description             Windows Vista - 64bit
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    osdevice                partition=D:
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {77da19a2-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f}
    nx                      OptIn
    device                  partition=D:
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.exe
    description             Windows Vista - 64bit
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    osdevice                partition=D:
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {77da19a2-2ae7-11de-a79b-8ffdb0066c6f}
    nx                      OptIn

    Friday, June 5, 2009 7:04 PM
  •  Got it!  Thanks again, KeithG2.  Sure would be nice if they'd just put that EDIT button back on the advanced settings window of the SYSTEM applet, wouldn't it!  :-)  I have to say the ease of installation with Win 7 32 bit version is a vast improvement over Vista, but MS is still doing things like this BCDEDIT and making you change BIOS settings for the 64 bit version which is the kind of thing that gave Vista such a bad reputation a year or two ago.  It's also a reason why their stock hasn't gone anywhere since Vista came out.  :(  Oh well, at least we have these forums to get help.
    Friday, June 5, 2009 7:18 PM
  • Just download and install EasyBCD like I mentioned at the bottom of my 1st post. The link is there.
    The utility will let you do everything that the BCDEDIT command prompt does.
    Friday, June 5, 2009 7:28 PM