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[Forum FAQ] Group Policy Preferences Scheduled Tasks Item not working when the option Run whether user is logged on or not is selected

    General discussion

  • Scenario:

    We use one of the following Group Policy Preferences Scheduled Tasks item to deploy a task to clients:

    • Computer Configuration -> Control Panel Settings -> Scheduled Tasks -> New -> Scheduled Task (At least Windows 7)
    • Computer Configuration -> Control Panel Settings -> Scheduled Tasks -> New -> Immediate Task (At least Windows 7)
    • User Configuration -> Control Panel Settings -> Scheduled Tasks -> New -> Scheduled Task (At least Windows 7)
    • User Configuration -> Control Panel Settings -> Scheduled Tasks -> New -> Immediate Task (At least Windows 7)

    (Note that on some platforms, "At least Windows 7" is replaced with "Windows Vista and later.")

    After designating a user account to run the task, we select “Run whether user is logged on or not” option, and “The Do not store password…” check box is automatically grayed out (See Figure 1).

    Figure 1

    After finishing configuring the task item, on a client, we run command gpupdate/force to forcefully update group policy. However, on the client, when we check if the task is listed in Task Scheduler snap-in, the task is not displayed, and when we run gpresult/h report.html to collect group policy result for troubleshooting, we see an error as similar as shown in the following figure (Figure 2).

    Figure 2

    Cause:

    To make the scheduled task run whether the user is logged on or not, we need to store the password of the designated user account. However, for the content of the scheduled task item is stored in Sysvol where it’s not safe to store passwords, this function has been deprecated.

    Workaround:

    We can run the task with system account NT Authority\System, or we can use specific user accounts to run the task when the given user is logged on. (See Figure 3)

    Figure 3

    Reference:

    MS14-025: Vulnerability in Group Policy Preferences could allow elevation of privilege: May 13, 2014

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2962486


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    • Edited by ForumFAQ Thursday, February 12, 2015 9:29 AM
    Thursday, February 12, 2015 8:46 AM