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is the captured OS is good for recapturing? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I know about capturing deployed image. 3 times allowed by sysprep. Usually, never use it.

    What about captured image?

    Let say I have a base VM that was captured. Then I need to make some changes. Sure I can import the same VM before I captured it from a backup.

    Is there any "harm" by sysprep after capturing?

    Do people use the captured VM for recapturing?


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 1:37 PM

Answers

  • There's no immediate harm by:

    1. Laying down your previously captured image (image 1)
    2. Making your changes
    3. Sysprepping it
    4. Capturing it
    5. Importing it into MDT (image 2)
    6. Deploying image 2

    However its not a best practice, you'll run into the sysprep limitation and you could potentially run into some issues on machines running image 2.

    The recommended method for updating your 'base' image is to rebuild it from scratch, and you can (and should) automate this process in MDT:

    1. Create task sequence called "Build reference image"
    2. As part of this task sequence choose the option to prepare and capture the image
    3. On your reference system (physical or virtual) boot into the Lite Touch image and choose the "Build reference image" task sequence.
    4. MDT installs Windows and all your other components and also runs sysprep and captures the image for you
    5. Import this image into MDT
    6. Create a task sequence to deploy it such as "Deploy Custom Image version #1"
    7. Deploy the image to your hardware using the "Deploy Custom Image Version #1" task sequence

    Fast forward 3 days/weeks/months later, you need to make revisions to the image.  Do so using the following process:

    1. Update your Deployment Share with the new applications, drivers etc..
    2. Update the "Build reference image" task sequence with your changes
    3. On your reference system (physical or virtual) boot into the Lite Touch image and choose the "Build reference image" task sequence. (Same as before)
    4. MDT installs Windows and all your other components and also runs sysprep and captures the image for you (Same as before)
    5. Import this new image into MDT (Same as before)
    6. Create a new task sequence to deploy it, for example "Deploy Custom Image Version #2"
    7. Deploy the image to your hardware using the "Deploy Custom Image Version #2" task sequence

    The difference is that you rebuild your reference image from scratch each time and sysprep is only run once.

    This is advantageous for several reasons including (but not limited to):

    1. Consistent process for building the reference image
    2. Requires no modification of the default install.wim
    3. Uses built in mechanisms of setup to add drivers and updates to the install
    4. Easy to add/remove components for testing
    5. No interaction required by the user or deployment technician.
    6. Decreases the risk of introducing configuration errors.

    With MDT automating the process of installing the operating system, drivers, updates, applications, and the capture of the image you ensure that each time you want to update an image the image is rebuilt in a consistent automated fashion.
    This image is also prepared with sysprep only once which helps prevent the random issues with images that have had sysprep run on them many times.

    • Edited by JuliusPIV Wednesday, May 27, 2015 2:55 PM
    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, May 27, 2015 3:35 PM
    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 2:47 PM
  • Looks like a solid plan.  I propose some minor changes in bold below:

    1. Boot the reference VM (that was not sysprepped & captured)
    2. Make updates
    3. Shutdown the VM
    4. Take a snapshot the VM
    5. Boot the VM
    6. Run Lite Touch from Windows and capture the image.
    7. Import the newly created WIM
    8. In TS, update the Install Operation System with your newly imported WIM.
    9. In the VM, revert to the snapshot - its ready for the next round of updates.
    10. Keep the original WIM somewhere (either in MDT, a, archived data share, USB stick etc.)


    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, May 27, 2015 4:30 PM
    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 3:54 PM

All replies

  • Let me see if I have this right

    1. Sysprep and Capture

    2. Load captured image, make changes

    3. Sysrep and capture it again

    You can do that but if you do that, you will run into the sysprep limit if you continue to do that. Which is why it's a really good practice to use a VM and snapshot it prior to the system being sysprep'd. You can rollback to the pre-sysprep version of your OS an infinite number of times.


    If this post is helpful please vote it as Helpful or click Mark for answer.

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 2:42 PM
  • There's no immediate harm by:

    1. Laying down your previously captured image (image 1)
    2. Making your changes
    3. Sysprepping it
    4. Capturing it
    5. Importing it into MDT (image 2)
    6. Deploying image 2

    However its not a best practice, you'll run into the sysprep limitation and you could potentially run into some issues on machines running image 2.

    The recommended method for updating your 'base' image is to rebuild it from scratch, and you can (and should) automate this process in MDT:

    1. Create task sequence called "Build reference image"
    2. As part of this task sequence choose the option to prepare and capture the image
    3. On your reference system (physical or virtual) boot into the Lite Touch image and choose the "Build reference image" task sequence.
    4. MDT installs Windows and all your other components and also runs sysprep and captures the image for you
    5. Import this image into MDT
    6. Create a task sequence to deploy it such as "Deploy Custom Image version #1"
    7. Deploy the image to your hardware using the "Deploy Custom Image Version #1" task sequence

    Fast forward 3 days/weeks/months later, you need to make revisions to the image.  Do so using the following process:

    1. Update your Deployment Share with the new applications, drivers etc..
    2. Update the "Build reference image" task sequence with your changes
    3. On your reference system (physical or virtual) boot into the Lite Touch image and choose the "Build reference image" task sequence. (Same as before)
    4. MDT installs Windows and all your other components and also runs sysprep and captures the image for you (Same as before)
    5. Import this new image into MDT (Same as before)
    6. Create a new task sequence to deploy it, for example "Deploy Custom Image Version #2"
    7. Deploy the image to your hardware using the "Deploy Custom Image Version #2" task sequence

    The difference is that you rebuild your reference image from scratch each time and sysprep is only run once.

    This is advantageous for several reasons including (but not limited to):

    1. Consistent process for building the reference image
    2. Requires no modification of the default install.wim
    3. Uses built in mechanisms of setup to add drivers and updates to the install
    4. Easy to add/remove components for testing
    5. No interaction required by the user or deployment technician.
    6. Decreases the risk of introducing configuration errors.

    With MDT automating the process of installing the operating system, drivers, updates, applications, and the capture of the image you ensure that each time you want to update an image the image is rebuilt in a consistent automated fashion.
    This image is also prepared with sysprep only once which helps prevent the random issues with images that have had sysprep run on them many times.

    • Edited by JuliusPIV Wednesday, May 27, 2015 2:55 PM
    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, May 27, 2015 3:35 PM
    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 2:47 PM
  • Julius, thanks for the best practice ...

    I guess I get the same result by doing the following:

    1. Boot Reference VM(exported VM) that was not captured

    2. Make updates

    3. Run Lite Touch from Windows and capture the image.

    4. Import the wim to Operating systems.

    5. In TS needed replace the path to new wim.

    6. Destroy captured VM.

    Version control... I can keep replaced wim in archive.

    Do you see the things that I am missing?

    Thanks.


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 3:35 PM
  • Looks like a solid plan.  I propose some minor changes in bold below:

    1. Boot the reference VM (that was not sysprepped & captured)
    2. Make updates
    3. Shutdown the VM
    4. Take a snapshot the VM
    5. Boot the VM
    6. Run Lite Touch from Windows and capture the image.
    7. Import the newly created WIM
    8. In TS, update the Install Operation System with your newly imported WIM.
    9. In the VM, revert to the snapshot - its ready for the next round of updates.
    10. Keep the original WIM somewhere (either in MDT, a, archived data share, USB stick etc.)


    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, May 27, 2015 4:30 PM
    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 3:54 PM
  • I was "scary" to capture chekpointed VM.

    And after Update of clean VM do export to keep the machine with today's updates until next one.

    Logically, there is nothing wrong I believe with capturing checkpointed VM.

    You just confirmed that.

    Thanks.


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015 4:30 PM