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Corrupt HD problems RRS feed

  • Question

  • Please take your time to read it all. I implemented some minor jokes to make it more worthwhile... ;)

    For some reason my HD seems to get corrupt all the time. When it does, I can't start anything I have recently installed or saved. Ridiculous because it renders my HD pretty useless.
    It got worse and worse and worse until it was unuseable. Why? Because at the point I formatted the C: Drive it took me 15 minutes to start up the pc! And then I still can't do much.
    How it got corrupt? No idea...
    Here's the complete situation step to step:
    PC Spec's:
    Compaq Presario *long code*. It's a 4 year old pc...
    Main OS: Windows XP Media Center SP3 (bloated, in other words: 4 year old OS never reinstalled. The typical thing... :p Still works though)
    CPU: Pentium D 2.8Ghz (Dual Core) Stock settings
    RAM: 1GB PC2-4300 (According to cpu-z. Though the manual for the pc says 667 Mhz... They scammed me... :p )
    Mobo: Unknown, never specified. (Where's all my damn info?! xD)
    HD: 250 GB HD is all I can tell you.
    Reader: Lightscribe, CD-RW, DVD-R, DVD+R etc. read and write. So anything except for bluray.
    Partitions (from the main os point of view):
    C: Windows XP. 68GB
    D: Recovery partition. 7Gb
    F: Programs partition. Shared between XP and Win7. 142 GB
    I:  Windows 7. 20 GB.
    Boot time at the time of win 7 install. FAST. 30 secs max.
    If you haven't realized it yet, I made a dual boot. ;)

    1) I first made a new partition called I: for windows 7 with Acronis Disk Director Suite.
    2) Installed win7 on it of course.
    3) All was fine and happy joy joy. Until I installed programs I always use such as: Firefox, Windows Live Messenger, Power Iso 4.3(doesn't work btw.) etc. (the usual must haves)
    4) Disk corruption first appearance! *dum dum dummmm*
    Now it gets bad. Boot times even before Boot OS selector were sky rocketing getting higher and higher. chkdsk came into play nagging my head off.
        NOTE: Windows XP chkdsk works WAY better than the windows 7 chkdsk!!!!!!!!!
    So it goes on for 2 weeks or so.
    5) Boot time before OS selector became 8 minutes! Also it didn't pop up anymore. It just straight ahead went to windows 7. It did a chkdsk and then it was back. Still taking long though.
    So I fragmented windows 7 (I:). Went into XP recovery which is in the recovery partition selectable in the os selector and did a fixmbr and fixboot. Also chkdsk.
    NOTE: Someone mentioned to me I should reload sata drivers for xp or something... Haven't done that because I had no idea what he was talking about.
    So now it still takes long before xp os selector but it works fine now.
    Just. a little slow... :p

    QUESTIONS:
    1. How can I fix the slow boot up of my pc now?

    2. How can I prevent this from happening the next time I install windows 7? (Because I really love it! :D)

    ~Datastream
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 11:47 AM

Answers

  •  

    Here is my growing list of things that could be responsible for slowing the start up, normal running and shutting down of your computer. Not all of them will apply to you but look through the list and try those that seem appropriate:

    1. Make sure your computer is free from malware as that can slow it down, i.e. run your ‘anti’ programs.

    2. Insufficient memory (RAM) can slow the system down. A minimum of 2GB is recommended, more if your system can cope with it.

    3. Indexing takes a day or so to settle down on a new computer. However, if you don’t do much internal searching, turn it off completely.

    4. Turn off Scheduled defragmentation via Windows Orb (Start) > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Defragmentation. However, every so often you need to check if any disks have become excessively fragmented, which can affect disk performance.

    5. If you’re using Windows Defender, stop it from auto-scanning and check if your antivirus program is scanning at boot time.

    6. You’ll get a slightly faster start up if you optimise the boot files and applications by running a special defragmentation from an elevated CMD prompt, i.e. click the Windows Orb (Start) > All Programs > Accessories and right-click Command Prompt, then ‘Run as Administrator’. Type defrag C:\ -b (note the two spaces) and press Enter.

    7. When you have a slow boot, check that no external drives have media in them. If they have, experiment by booting with it inserted and without. If you have a built-in card reader remove the little plastic cover that protects the slot, which can occasionally cause a slow down.

    8. To check if a particular program is slowing the machine when you switch on or shut down, e.g. an antivirus program, go to Control Panel > All Control Panel Items > Performance Information and Tools > Advanced Tools (in the left pane). On this screen the problem is sometimes shown. If not, click View Performance Details in Event Log (Event Viewer). Events in the 100 series are boot events and those in the 200 series are shut down events. These can be followed up by double-clicking them, then clicking Event Log Online at the bottom.

    9. You can use Process Explorer to see what services are running, including those as a part of a svchost.exe process. Get it here http://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

    10. Reduce the number of programs that start up when you switch on the computer.

    • Proposed as answer by BurrWalnut Tuesday, February 24, 2009 3:36 PM
    • Marked as answer by Arthur XieModerator Thursday, February 26, 2009 8:43 AM
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 3:07 PM

All replies

  •  

    Here is my growing list of things that could be responsible for slowing the start up, normal running and shutting down of your computer. Not all of them will apply to you but look through the list and try those that seem appropriate:

    1. Make sure your computer is free from malware as that can slow it down, i.e. run your ‘anti’ programs.

    2. Insufficient memory (RAM) can slow the system down. A minimum of 2GB is recommended, more if your system can cope with it.

    3. Indexing takes a day or so to settle down on a new computer. However, if you don’t do much internal searching, turn it off completely.

    4. Turn off Scheduled defragmentation via Windows Orb (Start) > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Defragmentation. However, every so often you need to check if any disks have become excessively fragmented, which can affect disk performance.

    5. If you’re using Windows Defender, stop it from auto-scanning and check if your antivirus program is scanning at boot time.

    6. You’ll get a slightly faster start up if you optimise the boot files and applications by running a special defragmentation from an elevated CMD prompt, i.e. click the Windows Orb (Start) > All Programs > Accessories and right-click Command Prompt, then ‘Run as Administrator’. Type defrag C:\ -b (note the two spaces) and press Enter.

    7. When you have a slow boot, check that no external drives have media in them. If they have, experiment by booting with it inserted and without. If you have a built-in card reader remove the little plastic cover that protects the slot, which can occasionally cause a slow down.

    8. To check if a particular program is slowing the machine when you switch on or shut down, e.g. an antivirus program, go to Control Panel > All Control Panel Items > Performance Information and Tools > Advanced Tools (in the left pane). On this screen the problem is sometimes shown. If not, click View Performance Details in Event Log (Event Viewer). Events in the 100 series are boot events and those in the 200 series are shut down events. These can be followed up by double-clicking them, then clicking Event Log Online at the bottom.

    9. You can use Process Explorer to see what services are running, including those as a part of a svchost.exe process. Get it here http://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

    10. Reduce the number of programs that start up when you switch on the computer.

    • Proposed as answer by BurrWalnut Tuesday, February 24, 2009 3:36 PM
    • Marked as answer by Arthur XieModerator Thursday, February 26, 2009 8:43 AM
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 3:07 PM
  • I'll go for option 7. But keep in mind that this is BEFORE the actual OS has started. So I don't think it's a virus. Or else some super hacker/scientist has to make such a high tech virus that nestles in your MBR...

    On an other forum someone mentioned they also had this problem when they're HD was dieing. I hope mine is not dieing.
    Thursday, March 12, 2009 3:59 PM
  • In Vista I had a similar problem.It could easily affect 7 too.

    Basically CHKDSK malfunctioned and I was unable to access,delete,copy or move any files. I had to an error message that one or more of my discs were corrupt and that I needed to run CHKDSK and reboot. This I did trusting the error message and within minutes of my system being ok the error reocurred.It was like ground hog day.

    If I chose to ignore the fault and browze the net the system slowed right down and eventually hung completely.

    When you run CHKDSK it is supposed to reset itself after a reboot.Sometimes it doesn't and you are stuck in a loop of checking disc errors that dont actually exhist.

    I found the solution by chance at Tech Republic.Link.

    This might not be your problem at all but if it is the fix is quick and painless.

     



     

     
    Friday, March 13, 2009 2:15 AM
  • first time i tried  6. to run defrag from the command prompt. It didnt know who I was (first time ever!) and even with admin password and id responded  "you have insufficient priveleges <0x89000024>"
    so I tried again and it worked just as it should. Thanks
    Friday, March 13, 2009 3:01 AM
  • I once saw a computer with a virus in the upper memory blocks, It is worth looking at the settings of your virus checker and seeing if it looks at system files, The really slow thing was happening recently on my computer probably a third of the time, I reboot a lot somedays. After a few minutes I was sure it was going nowhere, I have no partitions, it usually takes under 10 seconds to leave the splash screen, more like 3 seconds for a reboot. So when it happened I hit control-alt-delete and it reboots perfectly every time. I don't know why it stalls at this point, sometimes I am installing software and rebooting, sometimes just switching on. whatever the cause I treat it like an error. if it fails to leave that first screen it also fails to respond to f8 or f12 or esc .
    Friday, March 13, 2009 3:15 AM
  • I think the CHKDSK of Win7 is the problem.
    The first time I ran it because win7 asked me to I was like ok. But then after that first time things got worse.
    So now we have the culprit.
    I'm going to read that article and see what I can do with it.

    Thanks.
    Sunday, March 15, 2009 10:32 AM
  • Please take your time to read it all. I implemented some minor jokes to make it more worthwhile... ;)

    For some reason my HD seems to get corrupt all the time. When it does, I can't start anything I have recently installed or saved. Ridiculous because it renders my HD pretty useless.
    It got worse and worse and worse until it was unuseable. Why? Because at the point I formatted the C: Drive it took me 15 minutes to start up the pc! And then I still can't do much.
    How it got corrupt? No idea...
    Here's the complete situation step to step:
    PC Spec's:
    Compaq Presario *long code*. It's a 4 year old pc...
    Main OS: Windows XP Media Center SP3 (bloated, in other words: 4 year old OS never reinstalled. The typical thing... :p Still works though)
    CPU: Pentium D 2.8Ghz (Dual Core) Stock settings
    RAM: 1GB PC2-4300 (According to cpu-z. Though the manual for the pc says 667 Mhz... They scammed me... :p )
    Mobo: Unknown, never specified. (Where's all my damn info?! xD)
    HD: 250 GB HD is all I can tell you.
    Reader: Lightscribe, CD-RW, DVD-R, DVD+R etc. read and write. So anything except for bluray.
    Partitions (from the main os point of view):
    C: Windows XP. 68GB
    D: Recovery partition. 7Gb
    F: Programs partition. Shared between XP and Win7. 142 GB
    I:  Windows 7. 20 GB.
    Boot time at the time of win 7 install. FAST. 30 secs max.
    If you haven't realized it yet, I made a dual boot. ;)

    1) I first made a new partition called I: for windows 7 with Acronis Disk Director Suite.
    2) Installed win7 on it of course.
    3) All was fine and happy joy joy. Until I installed programs I always use such as: Firefox, Windows Live Messenger, Power Iso 4.3(doesn't work btw.) etc. (the usual must haves)
    4) Disk corruption first appearance! *dum dum dummmm*
    Now it gets bad. Boot times even before Boot OS selector were sky rocketing getting higher and higher. chkdsk came into play nagging my head off.
        NOTE: Windows XP chkdsk works WAY better than the windows 7 chkdsk!!!!!!!!!
    So it goes on for 2 weeks or so.
    5) Boot time before OS selector became 8 minutes! Also it didn't pop up anymore. It just straight ahead went to windows 7. It did a chkdsk and then it was back. Still taking long though.
    So I fragmented windows 7 (I:). Went into XP recovery which is in the recovery partition selectable in the os selector and did a fixmbr and fixboot. Also chkdsk.
    NOTE: Someone mentioned to me I should reload sata drivers for xp or something... Haven't done that because I had no idea what he was talking about.
    So now it still takes long before xp os selector but it works fine now.
    Just. a little slow... :p

    QUESTIONS:
    1. How can I fix the slow boot up of my pc now?

    2. How can I prevent this from happening the next time I install windows 7? (Because I really love it! :D)

    ~Datastream

    Ahaa. I see you are sharing files between os's.
    XP NTFS V5.2
    W7 NTFS V6.0

    Is XP 32bit or 64bit?
    Is W7 32bit or 64bit?

    How many partitions have you implemented on the HDD in question? Are these problems occurring on all partitions of the aforementioned 250Gb HDD?

    Also: "I first made a new partition called I: for windows 7 with Acronis Disk Director Suite" (why would you use 3rd party s/w for this, just as easy [easier] to do this via XP route?)

    Did any files within os's get corrupted or just files used by both os's?

    I had one of my HDDs (500Gb) die on me & replaced it last weekend (640Gb). I managed to save 99.89% of the data but the HDD was giving me CRC errors so I (as a rule) cannot trust the HDD anymore & I trashed it.

    My PC:
    650W
    +4200 64X2 Athlon
    4096MB DDR2 RAM (667)
    EN9600GT HTDI 1Gb [HDMI/DVI]
    1000/640/250/200/60 Gb HDDs
    etc.....
    Dual boot XP 32bit (ganged -no clk all DIMMs) / W7 64bit (unganged -clk all DIMMs)
    • Edited by M Kraak Tuesday, April 7, 2009 1:03 PM addition
    Tuesday, April 7, 2009 12:32 PM