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Reboot Loop after installing new RAID Drives RRS feed

  • Question

  • A client has a Dell T110 (with a PERC S100 RAID controller) running Windows 2008 R2. The system has two drives: a non-RAID hard drive (C:) running the OS, and a RAID1 data drive (E:) sharing data folders with the network. We need to install new, larger hard drives for the RAID data drive E:.

    I thought that I could back up the data on the existing RAID drive (E:), install the new disks, build a new array in the S100's boot-time virtual disk manager (VDM), boot into the OS, create the new partition for the data drive E:, and copy the data back. This was not the case. After installing the new disks and building the new array (which is reported as "READY (R/W)" during boot, Windows boots all the way to "Press CTRL-ALT+DELETE to log on". After two or three seconds, the system reboots. The same thing happens when I try to boot into Safe Mode. The system DOES NOT automatically boot to the Recovery Console. It never seems to know that an error has occurred and that the system didn't shut down normally.

    I've booted into the Recovery Console, installed the drivers for the PERC S100, and run Startup Recovery to no avail. Also in the Recovery Console, I've run "chkdsk E:\ /f" (remarkably, the drive letter for the data drive remained the same), and no errors were reported. I've also reinstalled the S100 drivers from the Recovery Console using DISM, but that changed nothing.

    I've booted to Windows 8.1 PE, installed the S100 drivers, formatted the new virtual disk, copied data to it, and everything works fine. The only problem is when I try to boot from the system drive (which has no problems) with the new disks installed.

    When I put the old drives back in, the system boots normally with no re-configuration needed. The boot-time VDM automatically remembers the disks and the array. Nothing shows up in the event logs indicating there was an error during the boot. The boot log (ntbtlog.txt), after several boots with the new drives in place, indicates that the system reboots at different points during driver loading. There is nothing consistent in the boot log to indicate what the problem is.

    The only clue I can see is that, during boot time, the VDM reports the original virtual drive as "NORMAL (R/W)" and the new virtual drive as "READY (R/W)", but I'm not sure about the significance of that difference or if it suggests a solution.

    I can't find any clues in any logs about what the problem may be. If anybody has any suggestions, I'll be grateful. I'll be especially grateful for off-the-wall suggestions.



    Tuesday, August 9, 2016 4:35 PM

Answers

  • Ok, I see. I can only guess something got jacked up with the boot order or configuration within the raid controller bios. I'd probably ask in the dell hardware forums where they'll have more knowledge in that area.

     

     



    Regards, Dave Patrick ....
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows Server] Datacenter Management

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, August 9, 2016 8:09 PM

All replies

  • Not clear if you're reinstalling 2008 R2? on a physical box? or on some hypervisor?

     

     



    Regards, Dave Patrick ....
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows Server] Datacenter Management

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, August 9, 2016 7:21 PM
  • @Dave Patrick:

    I am not reinstalling the OS. The OS resides on the non-RAID virtual drive C:. I'm replacing the data drive E:, which is a RAID1 drive, with larger disks. No VMs are in use. This is strictly a physical operation.


    Tuesday, August 9, 2016 8:02 PM
  • Ok, I see. I can only guess something got jacked up with the boot order or configuration within the raid controller bios. I'd probably ask in the dell hardware forums where they'll have more knowledge in that area.

     

     



    Regards, Dave Patrick ....
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows Server] Datacenter Management

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, August 9, 2016 8:09 PM