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Dual DPM servers for redundancy RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a fairly small network with  about 24 servers that don't process much data and 120 workstations.  I want to keep things as simple  as possible as my staff  does not handle issues well.

    I am looking at ditching tape backups entirely and going disc  to disk using large 8-10TB SAS drives.  My thought was to run 2 seperate DPM severs backing up everything twice.

    On Saturday Server A does a full backup then on Mon-Wed-Fri it does a differential

    On Sunday Server B does a Full Backup and a  Differential on Tues-Thur-Sat

    We have less than 10 TB of Data to back up and with Deduplication I am assuming that all of my full backups that are the same will not take up 4 TB each time.  

    I could also do a full backup on the 1st and 15th of the month and then do differential from there.

    Big question is will/does DPM flip a bit so that the system will be confused as to what it needs to back up 

    Should I just backup my DPM server and call it good.  The dual DPM servers makes it very easy to recover from a server going  down whereas backing up the DPM server means a full restore to get it back working.  

    I want to use 2 different locations just in case there is a power surge or water leak.  I have OM4 fiber between the 2 locations, they are about 50' apart but 2 very separate rooms.

    Or should I run Backup Exec on one set of days and DPM on the other?


    Wayne

    Wednesday, August 29, 2018 9:21 PM

Answers

  • Hi!

    Having a Primary and a Secondary DPM server is a good choice for redundancy. There are three different configurations that you can use when having two DPM servers.

    Primary to secondary protection 
    The database and replicas stored on a primary DPM server can be backed up to a secondary DPM server. If the primary server fails the secondary server continues to back up protected workloads. If the primary server fails you can do either of the following: Rebuild the primary server and restore its database and replicas from the secondary server. Then move the protected workloads back to the primary server after the rebuild. Select to switch protection to the secondary DPM server. With this setting you then restore to the protected computer directly from the secondary server when the need arises. For instructions, see Set up secondary servers.

    DPM chaining
    A chain of DPM servers provide protection, and each server protects the next one in in the chain. For example: DPM1 is protected by DPM2 (DPM1 is the primary and DPM2 is the secondary). DPM2 is protected by DPM3 (DPM2 is the primary and DPM3 is the secondary) For instructions, see Set up chaining.

    Cyclic protection
    One DPM server is backed up by another DPM server, and vice versa. So that DPM1 protects DPM2, and likewise DPM2 protects DPM1. This is useful for small environments.

    More information on the link below:
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/system-center/dpm/back-up-the-dpm-server?view=sc-dpm-1807

    From personal experience I've been using all of these methods in different environments and at different customers, and they've all worked fine.

    For a small environment I'd recommend using the cyclic protection, meaning having the Primary DPM server backed up by the Secondary DPM server and vice versa.

    What is important as with all backup softwares is the backup schedule, so that they don't overlap each other. 

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    • Proposed as answer by Leon Laude Monday, October 1, 2018 7:00 PM
    • Marked as answer by komondor Monday, October 1, 2018 7:24 PM
    Wednesday, August 29, 2018 9:56 PM

All replies

  • Hi!

    Having a Primary and a Secondary DPM server is a good choice for redundancy. There are three different configurations that you can use when having two DPM servers.

    Primary to secondary protection 
    The database and replicas stored on a primary DPM server can be backed up to a secondary DPM server. If the primary server fails the secondary server continues to back up protected workloads. If the primary server fails you can do either of the following: Rebuild the primary server and restore its database and replicas from the secondary server. Then move the protected workloads back to the primary server after the rebuild. Select to switch protection to the secondary DPM server. With this setting you then restore to the protected computer directly from the secondary server when the need arises. For instructions, see Set up secondary servers.

    DPM chaining
    A chain of DPM servers provide protection, and each server protects the next one in in the chain. For example: DPM1 is protected by DPM2 (DPM1 is the primary and DPM2 is the secondary). DPM2 is protected by DPM3 (DPM2 is the primary and DPM3 is the secondary) For instructions, see Set up chaining.

    Cyclic protection
    One DPM server is backed up by another DPM server, and vice versa. So that DPM1 protects DPM2, and likewise DPM2 protects DPM1. This is useful for small environments.

    More information on the link below:
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/system-center/dpm/back-up-the-dpm-server?view=sc-dpm-1807

    From personal experience I've been using all of these methods in different environments and at different customers, and they've all worked fine.

    For a small environment I'd recommend using the cyclic protection, meaning having the Primary DPM server backed up by the Secondary DPM server and vice versa.

    What is important as with all backup softwares is the backup schedule, so that they don't overlap each other. 

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    • Proposed as answer by Leon Laude Monday, October 1, 2018 7:00 PM
    • Marked as answer by komondor Monday, October 1, 2018 7:24 PM
    Wednesday, August 29, 2018 9:56 PM
  • Thanks for the response as with most questions if you dig enough you can find one but that does not mean it is really useful :)

    

    Your Experience is appreciated :)


    Wayne

    Monday, October 1, 2018 7:26 PM