none
Hide Connection Bar in Virtual Machine Connection

    Question

  • Hello All,

    I am reading this article:

    https://ravingroo.com/1097/captain-obvious-log-hide-remote-desktop-connection-bar/

    And am trying to do this with my Hyper-V Virtual Machine Connection windows, but do not see this available in the place that I would expect it via the dialogs found in the above article.

    Where is this hiding? :)

    Thank you,

    Michael

    Monday, February 11, 2019 9:58 AM

All replies

  • Hello Michael,

    You could just "unpin" the connection bar at the top.

    If your VM is on the same LAN as your client then you can connect to your VM using the standard Remote Desktop Connection and disable it there.

    Otherwise I'm not aware of any other way of hiding this.

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Monday, February 11, 2019 10:11 AM
  • Right... aware of this, see: annoying.  As the article I shared discusses, the bar shows back up when you maximize back into fullscreen, and always pops up when mousing over tabs in browsers, etc.

    Using RDC is another layer of complexity as it requires modifications to the OS to enable, etc.  I would rather stick to VMC, especially since I launch it from Hyper-V Manager with all of my instances conveniently listed and available.

    Monday, February 11, 2019 10:22 AM
  • "And am trying to do this with my Hyper-V Virtual Machine Connection windows"

    "I would rather stick to VMC"

    I'm a little confused.  Are you using VMC (VNC?) to connect to the Hyper-V management console and then using its VM connection capability to get into the VM?  If so, you won't be able to do much to alter the VMconnect window.  If you are using VNC to access the individual VMs, you need to talk with them about how to modify their screen presentation.


    tim

    Monday, February 11, 2019 3:13 PM
  • Ah, to be sure... VMC meaning Virtual Machine Connection, meaning that I double-click on an entry within my Hyper-V Manager (which of course lists all my running instances), and it opens a new Virtual Machine Connection.  This is the default behavior of the Hyper-V Manager and I have been doing this for years.
    Monday, February 11, 2019 3:32 PM
  • "VMC meaning Virtual Machine Connection"

    Okay.

    "Using RDC is another layer of complexity as it requires modifications to the OS to enable"

    A very simple setting that I automated in my deployments.

    It sounds like you are working within a lab environment.  I used RDman for my environments.  Allowed me to set up tree structured organization of my VM, regardless of which host on which they resides.  The amount of time saved in connecting to Virtual Machine Manager and selecting the VM over and over more than paid for itself in the little time it took to set up remote access on the host.

    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=44989


    tim

    Monday, February 11, 2019 3:41 PM
  • I actually do use RDCM for instances that I can get away with just one monitor.  For all my other instances (8-10), I have six monitors that I go into full screen and toggle between them pretty frequently throughout the day.  Unfortunately, RDCM is pretty inadequate when dealing with full-screen scenarios.

    Also, it is indeed easy to think that it's a "simple" setting, but it does open another port which lessens the security of the machine, as well as introduce "one extra thing" one needs to concern themselves with when standing up a new instance.  With VMC, the connection works exactly as if you are connecting to a local instance of a machine, exactly like the name describes.

    The frustrating thing here is that it seems that they both use the same code and dialogs, but one is different than the other.


    • Edited by Mike-EEE Monday, February 11, 2019 5:24 PM
    Monday, February 11, 2019 5:23 PM
  • The OTHER frustrating thing is that there appears to be a keyboard shortcut to SHOW the bar, but not one to HIDE it... *sigh*
    Monday, February 11, 2019 5:28 PM
  • A nice reminder of why leaving open a "simple" port can lead to very bad things:

    https://weblogs.asp.net/christoc/RemovingSystemFiles

    Tuesday, February 26, 2019 7:23 AM