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How can I change from ConstrainedLanguage to FullLanguage ? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I want to change the Language_Modes of PowerShell v5 from ConstrainedLanguage to FullLanguage.

    How can I do this ?

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Friday, February 3, 2017 11:45 AM

Answers

  • If you think about it, once you have changed the mode to "constrained"  you cannot do much of anything.  You are forever tuck in a land where very few commands are available or work.

    So you have now learned what constrained mode means.

    help about_lanhuage_mode


    \_(ツ)_/

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:09 AM

All replies

  • Change it on the definition of the PSRemoting server.

    $ExecutionContext.SessionState.LanguageMode

    $ExecutionContext.SessionState.LanguageMode=[System.Management.Automation.PSLanguageMode]::ConstrainedLanguage

    This is just a demo.  To set it read: help about_languageYou cannot cha get the language mode of an endpoint from the session or by any other means.  You can only create an end-point that supports a mode.

    By default, anyone in the "BUILTIN\Remote Management Users" group has "FullLanguage" permissions.


    \_(ツ)_/

    Friday, February 3, 2017 12:46 PM
  • Hello Yoshihiro,

    the constrained language mode is often caused by either Software Restriction Policy or Applocker. In either case, whitelisting the filehash of a file containing but the text "1" (without quotes).

    For details on that, see this thread.

    I believe this is also the default setting for mobile windows devices. Can't say how to do it there short of jailbreaking the device.

    Other than all that ... can't say I recall other causes for this language mode. Generally it's a matter of removing the cause, rather than trying to override it through a specific setting.

    Cheers,
    Fred


    There's no place like 127.0.0.1

    Friday, February 3, 2017 12:47 PM
  • Friday, February 3, 2017 12:53 PM
  • Hi

    Yes, I can change the Language mode from FullLanguage to CostrainedLanguage.

    But After that,
    I cannot change the Language mode to FullLanguage from CostrainedLanguage,
    by ConstrainedLanguage mode support only core type.

    Environment:
    Surface Pro 4, Windows 10 Pro

    The reason of changed to CostrainedLanguage, is learn what is CostrainedLanguage.
    Now, I want to change to FullLanguage from CostrainedLanguage,

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:04 AM
  • If you think about it, once you have changed the mode to "constrained"  you cannot do much of anything.  You are forever tuck in a land where very few commands are available or work.

    So you have now learned what constrained mode means.

    help about_lanhuage_mode


    \_(ツ)_/

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:09 AM
  • Hi jrv

    "Cannot change PowerShell Language mode from CostrainedLanguage to FullLanguage" is learning.

    "help about_language_mode" is long text to find this learning.
    and also some blog posts, threads is long text to find this learning.

    Now, I start to learning what happened in ConstrainedLanguage, OMS agent, AD scripts, etc.
    and I initialize my Surface Pro 4 by USB Refreash image.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata  


    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:19 AM
  • If you set contrained mode it goes back to fulllanguage if you just exit from PowerShell.  It cannot be made permanent in a normal session.

    Read the "about" for full understanding.


    \_(ツ)_/

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:26 AM
  • Thank you, jrv

    From about, I cannot find "cannot be made permanent in a normal session", before change Language mode.
    So, I do it.

    A lot of documents about Security Attack with PowerShell in blogs/threads,
    I want to know
    what can I do for prevent these attack with PowerShell,
    what cannot,
    which my usage of PowerShell action is error.

    Our customers/partners do use a lot of PowerShell script tools for AD, Azure, Office 365, etc.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

     

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:39 AM
  • PowerShell is more secure than your browser.  Don't worry about it.  Don't run as an admin and keep you firewall high and your powder dry.

    Don't download untrusted scripts or executables from the web.

    Post any further issue in the Security forum for more information.


    \_(ツ)_/

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:47 AM
  • Hi jrv

    Yes, PowerShell is secure.

    And, Security researcher say "Some attacks use PowerShell script",

    Microsoft Malware Protection Center - blog
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mmpc/

    So, I learn how can I secure my PC's PowerShell.

    I will use Security forum for security issue

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 12:59 AM
  • At an elevated admin prompt you can do thi to restrict unwanted scripts:

    Set-ExecutionPolicy Alligned.

    At  minimum you want this:

    Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

    By deafult PowerShell is set to the most restrictive unless you have changed it:

    Get-ExecutionPolicy -List


    \_(ツ)_/

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 1:34 AM
  • Hi, jrv

    Thank you, ExecutionPolicy for PowerShell security.
    I do RemoteSigned by my default,
    and do AllSigned for special trusted script like Microsoft.

    and CostrainedLanguage mode is added for prevent more attacks, I think.
    for users who use E-Mai, Web.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 1:45 AM
  • We must set the scripting policy for the machine once at an elevated admin prompt.  After that it does not get changed.  No need to set AllSigned fro MS scripts that are signed.  Be sure to always carefully inspect all scripts you download that are unsigned before you execute them with any setting.


    \_(ツ)_/

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 2:21 AM
  • HI, jrv

    Yes, I think AllSigned ExecutionPolicy is good for Microsoft Scripts.

    and I think too hard for caurefully,
    there are a lot of attacks that include PowerShell scripts in LNK in ZIP in Word macro in E-mail attach file or, that include PowerShell scripts in web contents in normal web sites controlled by attackers.

    -- from Microsoft Malware Protection Center - blog
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mmpc/

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 2:31 AM
  • I think you are reading too much fake news.

    I suggest you start by learning PowerShell so you will understand how it works.  It is the best way to avoid trouble.

    You can start here: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/gg261722.aspx


    \_(ツ)_/

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 2:35 AM
  • Hi jrv.

    Thank you for introducing learning url of PowerShell 2.0 security.
    I will learn this, with PowerShell 5.0 new features for security.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Saturday, February 4, 2017 2:42 AM
  • Hi Yoshihiro,

    the thing about PowerShell is this:
    It's not the breach, it's what is sometimes used after the breach is made!

    Sure, a word macro can run a PowerShell script. It can also download and run a c++ compiled application.

    Shouldn't you be worrying about that word file? What's your mail server doing, allowing legacy formats that can contain macros into your company? Or where are the policies that disable macros in word?

    No offense, but you should thank god that villains like using PowerShell, because PowerShell comes with lots of funny logging tools, making it a lot easier to understand what the intruder did ... if you set up your logging, of course.

    Some intruders may be using PowerShell. All your admins should be using it to administrate the system. Frankly, I have found locking down PowerShell itself impacts your own ability to react to incidents far more than it ever stopped an intruder. It's not the breach, fix those first.

    Cheers,
    Fred


    There's no place like 127.0.0.1

    Monday, February 6, 2017 12:42 PM
  • Hi FWN, thank you for your reply, and I pleasure this thread.

    "Shouldn't you be worrying about that word file ?",
    Yes, my customers/partners/IT pros use word/excel files with macros.
    just like survey, monthly summaries, task management, etc.

    "PowerShell comes with lots of funny logging tools".
    Yes, I send these log to Microsoft Operations Management Suite,
    for setting alerts, analytics behavior.

    and I create some scripts for administrate management.

    Now, I learn the ConstrainedLanguage of PowerShell for current attack vector methods.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Monday, February 6, 2017 8:14 PM
  • Hi FWN, thank you for your reply, and I pleasure this thread.

    "Shouldn't you be worrying about that word file ?",
    Yes, my customers/partners/IT pros use word/excel files with macros.
    just like survey, monthly summaries, task management, etc.

    "PowerShell comes with lots of funny logging tools".
    Yes, I send these log to Microsoft Operations Management Suite,
    for setting alerts, analytics behavior.

    and I create some scripts for administrate management.

    Now, I learn the ConstrainedLanguage of PowerShell for current attack vector methods.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Hi Yoshihiro,

    regarding macro viruses: There's a policy that disables unsigned office macros. Of course that requires you to ensure all those macros get signed, first (are they?).

    I seriously recommend skipping constrained language mode as a security mechanism. It isn't, wasn't and has never been intended as such. It's to ensure system integrity on Windows RT devices. You'll get significantly further with Applocker / Software Restriction Policy in preventing malicious code execution. Incidentally, using either mechanism will cause constrained language mode. This was one of the things I had to work hardest to circumvent, since for us, using constrained language mode is considered more a handicap to the blue team than to the red team.

    Cheers,
    Fred


    There's no place like 127.0.0.1

    Tuesday, February 7, 2017 8:36 AM
  • Hi FWN, thank you for "skip" advice.

    I'm start macro signed management, Applocker, System Restriction Policy with our customers/partners.

    I will need the usage of unsinged office macro in the organization,
    I hope monitoring with Microsoft Operations Management Suite.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Tuesday, February 7, 2017 8:48 AM
  • Hi Yoshihiro,

    we have excellent experience with using SRP (most of our customers are on a scale where Enterprise (and thus Applocker) just isn't attractive enough). With users not having administrative rights, we restrict SRP to non-elevated processes, which means only non-elevated PowerShell consoles are locked into constrained language mode. This way, an admin can still use the full power of his tools, wherever s/he needs to do his or her work.

    We have yet to have a customer with that setup (plus of course conventional endpoint hardening measures) catch another infection.

    Cheers,
    Fred


    There's no place like 127.0.0.1

    Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:26 AM
  • What if you do this with administrative privileges?

    Remove-Item Env:__PSLockdownPolicy

    Of course, to do that, your account has to have the right to modify system variables.

    I don't advocate for doing so, but you may try this approach by using regsvr32, and execute a windows script remotely if you find yourself locked down and you really need to use FullLanguage under App Locker (Why would you?)

    See here


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...


    Tuesday, February 7, 2017 2:03 PM
  • Hi Exotic Hadron, Thank you advice.
    The result of Remove-Item is still Constrained mode.

    Reproduce step:
    1. Open Microsoft PowerShell ISE as Administrator
    2. Do below

    PS C:\> $ExecutionContext.SessionState.LanguageMode
    ConstrainedLanguage
    
    PS C:\> $Env:__PSLockdownPolicy
    4
    
    PS C:\> Remove-Item Env:__PSLockdownPolicy
    
    PS C:\> $Env:__PSLockdownPolicy
    
    PS C:\> $ExecutionContext.SessionState.LanguageMode
    ConstrainedLanguage

    After restart my machine, ConstrainedLanguage

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabata

    Wednesday, February 8, 2017 2:36 AM
  • Hi, FWN. Thank you, SRP Enterprise story.

    SRP = System Restriction Policy.

    Users is ConstrainedLanguage mode,
    Admin is FullLanguage mode.

    This scenario is good for Enterprise.
    and with Applocker.

    Regards,
    Yoshihiro Kawabaa

    Wednesday, February 8, 2017 2:46 AM
  • cmd > powershell -Version 2

    You're now out of CLM.

    Monday, June 11, 2018 3:14 PM
  • Hi, Rodney.

    Thank you for your reply.
    and I'm using PowerShell version 5.1, instead of 2.
    and "PowerShell -Version 2" is error because not installed.

    Monday, June 11, 2018 9:38 PM