locked
Site Binding Error RRS feed

  • Question

  • hello there

    I have domain with godady with 2 host name ns1.mydomain.com and ns2.mydomain.com forwarding to my home ip address
    I have created the site and added these two host name with my home ip address on IIS 7 manager; however when i search the site on web or localhost. the site would not show up or any error massages. The site contains photos and flash.

    I have cheak my linksys router and I have opend the port 80.

    I be glad to hear your suggestions, thanks nick.
    .
    Monday, February 2, 2009 8:43 AM

Answers

  • Hey,

    I'm still a little unclear on how your set up. But hopefully the following will help:

    Your side

    - Your server is on an IP of 192.168.1.xxx, lets call this '192.168.1.10'
    - Your Linksys router should have a port forward from your external interface, mapping to 192.168.1.10 for TCP port 80
    - Create a new site within IIS (I wouldn't use the default). I would change the default site to bind on port 8000 or something
    - For the bindings on this site, choose type 'http', IP 'all unassigned', port '80'. For the host name, you could leave this blank.
    This will leave you with only your new site bound to port 80 in IIS and your default site inaccessible from the outside world.

    With GoDaddy

    Your domain name needs DNS servers to operate or to host a website, e-mail etc. DNS is what makes a domain name work, by telling the world which IP address to contact.
    Often the provider of your domain name will provide DNS servers for your domain at no cost.
    What you need to do is leave the DNS servers with Godaddy and instead create a host record on these DNS servers. This is done through a management panel.
    http://help.godaddy.com/topic/163/article/666
    You will create an 'A' record or host record, most likely of www. This will point to your public IP on the internet. Which will make the host www.yourdomain.com operate.

    From what you have said I think you may have got confused and changed (or added to) the NS records for your domain name. These are the 'Name Server' records used for entry in the DNS system. You need to change these back to point to Godaddy's DNS and remove your entries:
    http://help.godaddy.com/topic/163/article/5057

    In order for the above to work you need a static public IP on your broadband connection. If you don't have this, you will have to look at using a system like www.dyndns.com

    Also, the reason you don't see the site http://localhost is because you are stipulating a host header by which the site will respond. Localhost is not included in this binding, therfore it wont respond. By leaving the host name blank, the site will respond to anything, internally or externally - which will probably suit your purpose.

    Hope this helps, Ross

    • Proposed as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Tuesday, February 3, 2009 3:33 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Monday, February 9, 2009 3:11 AM
    Monday, February 2, 2009 11:42 PM
  •  Hi Nick,

    Unless you really want to, I don't see any need to run the DNS yourself. It is only another admin headache and potential security risk. The method you are describing means that you are hosting your own DNS with no resiliance. I would let Godaddy host the DNS for your domain (or DynDNS as below) and simply create the host records on their DNS management.

    I'm in the UK so don't know much about Comcast as an ISP, but a quick look on the net would indicate that you don't have a static IP, even although it may not change for a long period of time. I would still consider this as being a dynamic IP if you want your site to be reliable, in case a change occurs. You can check what your public IP is by visiting www.whatismyip.com
    If you choose to consider the IP as static, your site may continue to work until next year or maybe just tomorrow. If however you would like to keep the site alive through a public IP change, then Dyndns offer a free service for update of Dynamic IP's:

    http://www.dyndns.com/services/dns/dyndns/

    Using Dyndns may also be a good idea as instead of using Godaddy for DNS, you would be pointing at Dyndns servers. If you look at the link above you will find a good 'how-to' document.

    Your current setup of pointing the DNS to yourself is workable, but I wouldnt advise it. It wouldnt be reliable and you'd have to open up more firewall ports to make it work
    Creating the zone is correct but within the zone you need to create the entries with your public IP addresses, not private internal addresses.

    Incidentally, home broadband connections are not really the place for websites and it is often against the AUP of the ISP. If the site is just for a play about and a learning experience, no-one will care, but if you are planning something higher traffic - consider hosting.

    Hope this helps.

    Ross
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 12:09 PM

All replies

  • Hi Nick,

    If you browse http://127.0.0.1 from your home server do you see the site? Or at least the default site in IIS
    Also, I presume you have a static IP on your home broadband connection?

    NS1 and NS2 are usually used for name servers rather than websites. Are you using DNS servers for your domain name and then setting up a www host record on the DNS servers to point to your home IP?

    Also, on IIS the IP on the host header will be the static private IP of your server as your router will be doing NAT and IIS doesn't need to know the public IP.
    Monday, February 2, 2009 5:13 PM
  • hello there,

    thanks for your quick respond,

    Yes, i have set this server with static ip address 192.168.1.xxx and i have made subnet of 225.225.225.0
    I have send two binding for the site one is call ns1.mydomain.com with ip (my home ip address) and another
    call ns2.mydomain.com (same ip).

    The problem is whenever i assiagn these binds to the site.. I could no longer see the site on http://localhost.
    either way i am looking for soultion to host this sit and link it to godady domain I have.

    I am sorry i dont know how to assign DNS servers. I thought Sit binding would be enough to match godady domain
    to the hoste site. I be very thankful for your help, Thanks nick
    Monday, February 2, 2009 8:41 PM
  • Hey,

    I'm still a little unclear on how your set up. But hopefully the following will help:

    Your side

    - Your server is on an IP of 192.168.1.xxx, lets call this '192.168.1.10'
    - Your Linksys router should have a port forward from your external interface, mapping to 192.168.1.10 for TCP port 80
    - Create a new site within IIS (I wouldn't use the default). I would change the default site to bind on port 8000 or something
    - For the bindings on this site, choose type 'http', IP 'all unassigned', port '80'. For the host name, you could leave this blank.
    This will leave you with only your new site bound to port 80 in IIS and your default site inaccessible from the outside world.

    With GoDaddy

    Your domain name needs DNS servers to operate or to host a website, e-mail etc. DNS is what makes a domain name work, by telling the world which IP address to contact.
    Often the provider of your domain name will provide DNS servers for your domain at no cost.
    What you need to do is leave the DNS servers with Godaddy and instead create a host record on these DNS servers. This is done through a management panel.
    http://help.godaddy.com/topic/163/article/666
    You will create an 'A' record or host record, most likely of www. This will point to your public IP on the internet. Which will make the host www.yourdomain.com operate.

    From what you have said I think you may have got confused and changed (or added to) the NS records for your domain name. These are the 'Name Server' records used for entry in the DNS system. You need to change these back to point to Godaddy's DNS and remove your entries:
    http://help.godaddy.com/topic/163/article/5057

    In order for the above to work you need a static public IP on your broadband connection. If you don't have this, you will have to look at using a system like www.dyndns.com

    Also, the reason you don't see the site http://localhost is because you are stipulating a host header by which the site will respond. Localhost is not included in this binding, therfore it wont respond. By leaving the host name blank, the site will respond to anything, internally or externally - which will probably suit your purpose.

    Hope this helps, Ross

    • Proposed as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Tuesday, February 3, 2009 3:33 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Monday, February 9, 2009 3:11 AM
    Monday, February 2, 2009 11:42 PM
  • Thank you Ross

    I have removed the host binding I have made and that solve the http://localhost issue. 

    I also have call Godady and they help me to build two name server ns1.mydomain.info and ns2.mydomain.info

    with redirect ip address of my home.

    about the static IP address. I have Comcast Home internet at home however my home IP address hasn't been changed in past 8 months so I was wondering should I still treat this as static or dynamic ip setup for DNS.

     One last thing, I am first timer and I needed your approval about these steps.

    on DNS Manager;

    I have created new zone on forward look up zone name: mydomain.info (primary zone)

    then I created two host with the name ns1 and

    ns2 with  ip address of 192.168.1.10 (server ip address).

    I also created reverse look up zone at range 192.168.1

     Is this a correct way to creat DNS for the site corresbonding to Godady name server?

     

    Thank you! nick

    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 7:43 AM
  •  Hi Nick,

    Unless you really want to, I don't see any need to run the DNS yourself. It is only another admin headache and potential security risk. The method you are describing means that you are hosting your own DNS with no resiliance. I would let Godaddy host the DNS for your domain (or DynDNS as below) and simply create the host records on their DNS management.

    I'm in the UK so don't know much about Comcast as an ISP, but a quick look on the net would indicate that you don't have a static IP, even although it may not change for a long period of time. I would still consider this as being a dynamic IP if you want your site to be reliable, in case a change occurs. You can check what your public IP is by visiting www.whatismyip.com
    If you choose to consider the IP as static, your site may continue to work until next year or maybe just tomorrow. If however you would like to keep the site alive through a public IP change, then Dyndns offer a free service for update of Dynamic IP's:

    http://www.dyndns.com/services/dns/dyndns/

    Using Dyndns may also be a good idea as instead of using Godaddy for DNS, you would be pointing at Dyndns servers. If you look at the link above you will find a good 'how-to' document.

    Your current setup of pointing the DNS to yourself is workable, but I wouldnt advise it. It wouldnt be reliable and you'd have to open up more firewall ports to make it work
    Creating the zone is correct but within the zone you need to create the entries with your public IP addresses, not private internal addresses.

    Incidentally, home broadband connections are not really the place for websites and it is often against the AUP of the ISP. If the site is just for a play about and a learning experience, no-one will care, but if you are planning something higher traffic - consider hosting.

    Hope this helps.

    Ross
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 12:09 PM