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What's wrong with my laptop? RRS feed

  • Question

  • My laptop starts successfully and I can access my desktop. However, when I try to click on a program-whether it's Word, Internet Explorer or My Documents etc.-it freezes. The message ''This application is not responding. The program may repsond again if you wait. Do you want to end this process?'' appears. I then have to force shut down.

    Also, my laptop does not recognise an internet connection even though my internet is working fine on my PC. I ran a scan on Microsoft Security Essentials but it did not pick anything up.


    Maahwish
    Monday, September 26, 2011 7:49 PM

All replies

  • This could be some kind of corruption or virus related issue or even hardware fault. But one thing at a time.

    Couple things I'd suggest to start, open command prompt. type cmd.exe, right click run as administrator. type chkdsk /f , then type y for following option

    type sfc /scannow 

    Let the repair process run and see if it fixes anything. Then restart machine.

    I'd suggest running another antivirus program aswell. not sure on the rules for links here so pm me if you are unsure of some free good ones.

     

    Finally you could try hardware diagnostics or a clean install, either one will draw a conclusion of what's wrong.

    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 2:40 PM
  • Thanks! Just a quick question: How do I get to command prompt? Via Safe Mode?

     

    Thank you :)


    Maahwish
    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 10:23 PM
  • I am experiencing the same problem.  I am able to get the logon window and can log on successfully. The desktop looks correct but when I attempt to start a program it appears as if nothing is happening.  To test this I attempted to start Freecell and it actually did start finally but it took about 7 minutes from the time I clicked on the icon until it started.  During this time the hard drive light blinks from time to time. 

    I went to the Start button and attempted to run control panel but the same thing happened.  I never did get this one to come up on the screen. 

    I also pressed Ctrl+alt+Delete to see if I could start task manager.  After a while the screen went black, and after several minutes I got a message that the task manager could not be started at that time. 

    I have run full antivirus scans and found nothing.  This is a new laptop with the I7 processor and 6 gb of memory.  I is a Toshiba laptop and when I spoke with their support group, I was told to re-install Windows 7 from the recovery DVD's.  This doesn't seem like a solution based on what I saw but I suppose it is an easy way to get out of something they don't understand. 

    I am still in the process of trying to figure this out and I have removed most of the software I installed and am running without Virus scan to see if that might be the problem.

    The Laptop came with Win7 Home Premium 64 bit and I upgraded to Win7 pro after getting the laptop.

    I usually can get it to work when I do a forced shutdown (power button) and restart.  The problem usually, but not always,  occurs after I close the cover on the laptop and open it at a later time. 

    Greg

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 12:02 AM
  • Thanks! Just a quick question: How do I get to command prompt? Via Safe Mode?

     

    Thank you :)


    Maahwish
    If windows vista/7 then the search bar on the start menu, you can just type "cmd.exe". If xp on start menu , run then "cmd.exe"  (without the speech marks of course).
    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 8:12 AM
  • It's a common practice for manufacturers to ask you to restore from recovery media. The reason being is that it removes the chance that you or someone/something  else has done something to system. If a restore to a factory state fails it implies either a problem with the media or a hardware fault.

    When you close the cover on your laptop it will go to sleep to save battery, some drivers and hardware have problems when trying to wake from sleep. If you don't get a bluescreen on this you could look through event viewer for errors after a sleep has occured. Then possible update a driver if required.

    If the problem has happened recently, try the system restore utility. This allows you to go back to a previous point in time with out removing your personal data.

    Last points, if you find an error you can dump the information on here and one the experienced members might be able to debug it. Finally if all else fails restore your machine via the recovery media, if this does not work (if under warranty) toshiba will collect and run diagnostics/fix any problems.

     

    Ethan

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 8:21 AM
  • This is a new laptop PC purchased about a week ago. About the only modification is that I upgraded from Win 7 Home Premium to Win 7 Professional.

    Thanks for the response.

     

    Greg

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 1:20 PM
  • As it is still new, I would suggest that you restore it back to factory condition, test it before upgrading to professional. If the problem continues take it back or send it back to where ever it is from as a faulty unit. If the there is no problem upgrade to professional again and see if the problem is rectified. 

    There shouldn't be any reason why professional is causing the issue. Either way you will find out if its a hardware or software issue. Hardware return to supplier, software we maybe able to fix =D.


    The answers/solutions that I provide are from personal experience. They are as is and come with no warranty.
    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 4:10 PM
  • Hi,
     
    I just want to know whether this problem still occurs in Safe Mode?
     
    “Thanks! Just a quick question: How do I get to command prompt? Via Safe Mode?”
     
    You may run Command Prompt in Windows RE:
    1.       Start up your computer, press F8,then chose system repair.(Or put the Windows 7 installation disc in the disc drive, and then start the computer.)
    2.       Press a key when you are prompted.
    3.       Select a language, a time, a currency, a keyboard or an input method, and then click Next.
    4.       Click Repair your computer.
    5.       Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.
    6.       In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt.
    In case this problem persists and occurs in safe mode as well, you may try to perform an In-Place Upgrade to repair your system. However, the software you installed and your files wouldn’t lost during in-place upgrade:
     
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2255099
     
    If you have further question about this problem, please feel free and let me know
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    Friday, September 30, 2011 4:14 AM
  • There are many possible culprits here... the most likely being the degree of fragmentation on your hard drive, whether any data has been written to bad sectors on the drive, the amount of free space on the drive, the amount of ram onboard and the amount of virtual memory space available and whether it is on the same hard drive or partition as the system files, the number of startup items in the User profile folder, the number of background programs running, and then your drive caching and writing options, followed by whether DMA or even UDMA is enabled for the drive controllers...There may be seperate options to control the last item in your bios, as well as inside of windows device managers properties tabs for them.  I've listed these from start to finish as the most likely culprits to fix first, followed by next likely, then next most...etc.  AND there are many more possible things that could be contributing to a system bottleneck, as well. It WOULD BE A SMALL NOVEL's worth of writing for me, and a long boring technical read for you if I did, so here is what I would recommend you do and why...

    #1 :  DEFRAGMENT, DEFRAGMENT DEFRAGMENT.   Make this your mantra and live by it. It is not enough to assume that windows will defragment your computer every wednesday a.m. at 3:00 like it says it has been doing...it probably hasn't been left on overnight for this to happen...(mine either...). Analyze the disk first....nine times out of ten windows will tell you that you do not need to defragment the drive. now read the analysis report..

    There will never be more than two fragmented files on a thoroughly, properly defragmented drive. Any thing beyond two fragmented files is unnaceptable.  The two files that never get defragmented, by the way, are the paging file, the master file tables themselves (off user portion of disk) and the current sysvol.inf file used to build the desktop when you log in. I have seen windows systems die from never having been defragmented...no kidding there! (I have seen a small, 900 kb file that was stored in 10,000 pieces-meaning there were more on disk file records of where the file pieces were stored at taking up more space than the file they linked together!) WINDOWS will tell you it doesnt need to be defragged, usually...DO IT ANYWAYS, AND DO NOT BROWSE OR USE THE COMPUTER AT ALL WHILE IT IS DEFRAGGING, BECAUSE THOSE OPENED FILES OR APPS DON'T GET DEFRAGGED EITHER. I'm not yelling, just trying to communicate how vital to your system this one task is...it can be life or death to your windows, and speed or crawling to you.

    The next major issue you will definitely be encountering here is from having to force windows off...Avoid doing this at all costs. When the power is cut off to the hard drives, even the fastest, most modern hard drives of any maker or model will drop the read/write heads onto the disks,creating missing or "bad" sectors. The problem here is that windows does not perform write testing outside of setup on a fresh partition or formatting until you make it check for them by scheduling a disk check with the full surface scanning and fix file and folders errors enabled. During the full surface scan, which will be annoyingly time consuming, (but needed by all users) Windows will look for bad sectors and mark them as permanently unuseable. WINDOWS MAY WRITE TO A BAD SECTOR WITH EASE...It is when windows tries to read the data back later, and retrieves either corrupted data or just plain freezes, that the issue manifests. Every hard drive has bad sectors, every user should be aware of this,  our only hope is to find the bad sectors before they are written tO,  thus avoiding the "random" freezes and lockups. I've written a small novel here anyways, so I'm pasting you this link. Follow it, select windows, select all problem areas, and run the free app from MICROSOFT.  One final tip would be to visit the maker of your processors website to ensure you have the correct chipset drivers for your motherboard, as windows always uses generics in setup for greater compatibility with more makes and models...If you need more assistance, you may email me at    t.welch2112@yahoo.com

    because I have barely touched the tip of the iceberg on what can be done to get the most from your machine for no cost to you...all of these things you can do, and more.

    http://support.microsoft.com/fixit/


    "http://support.microsoft.com/fixit/default.aspx/". This is MICROSOFT'S new, FREE, fully automated, anonymous support portal, which can help users resolve windows and other product issues with a few mouse clicks. BOOKMARK THIS SITE, EVERYBODY !!!
    Friday, September 30, 2011 5:53 AM
  • There are many possible culprits here... the most likely being the degree of fragmentation on your hard drive, whether any data has been written to bad sectors on the drive, the amount of free space on the drive, the amount of ram onboard and the amount of virtual memory space available and whether it is on the same hard drive or partition as the system files, the number of startup items in the User profile folder, the number of background programs running, and then your drive caching and writing options, followed by whether DMA or even UDMA is enabled for the drive controllers...There may be seperate options to control the last item in your bios, as well as inside of windows device managers properties tabs for them.  I've listed these from start to finish as the most likely culprits to fix first, followed by next likely, then next most...etc.  AND there are many more possible things that could be contributing to a system bottleneck, as well. It WOULD BE A SMALL NOVEL's worth of writing for me, and a long boring technical read for you if I did, so here is what I would recommend you do and why...

    #1 :  DEFRAGMENT, DEFRAGMENT DEFRAGMENT.   Make this your mantra and live by it. It is not enough to assume that windows will defragment your computer every wednesday a.m. at 3:00 like it says it has been doing...it probably hasn't been left on overnight for this to happen...(mine either...). Analyze the disk first....nine times out of ten windows will tell you that you do not need to defragment the drive. now read the analysis report..

    There will never be more than two fragmented files on a thoroughly, properly defragmented drive. Any thing beyond two fragmented files is unnaceptable.  The two files that never get defragmented, by the way, are the paging file, the master file tables themselves (off user portion of disk) and the current sysvol.inf file used to build the desktop when you log in. I have seen windows systems die from never having been defragmented...no kidding there! (I have seen a small, 900 kb file that was stored in 10,000 pieces-meaning there were more on disk file records of where the file pieces were stored at taking up more space than the file they linked together!) WINDOWS will tell you it doesnt need to be defragged, usually...DO IT ANYWAYS, AND DO NOT BROWSE OR USE THE COMPUTER AT ALL WHILE IT IS DEFRAGGING, BECAUSE THOSE OPENED FILES OR APPS DON'T GET DEFRAGGED EITHER. I'm not yelling, just trying to communicate how vital to your system this one task is...it can be life or death to your windows, and speed or crawling to you.

    The next major issue you will definitely be encountering here is from having to force windows off...Avoid doing this at all costs. When the power is cut off to the hard drives, even the fastest, most modern hard drives of any maker or model will drop the read/write heads onto the disks,creating missing or "bad" sectors. The problem here is that windows does not perform write testing outside of setup on a fresh partition or formatting until you make it check for them by scheduling a disk check with the full surface scanning and fix file and folders errors enabled. During the full surface scan, which will be annoyingly time consuming, (but needed by all users) Windows will look for bad sectors and mark them as permanently unuseable. WINDOWS MAY WRITE TO A BAD SECTOR WITH EASE...It is when windows tries to read the data back later, and retrieves either corrupted data or just plain freezes, that the issue manifests. Every hard drive has bad sectors, every user should be aware of this,  our only hope is to find the bad sectors before they are written tO,  thus avoiding the "random" freezes and lockups. I've written a small novel here anyways, so I'm pasting you this link. Follow it, select windows, select all problem areas, and run the free app from MICROSOFT.  One final tip would be to visit the maker of your processors website to ensure you have the correct chipset drivers for your motherboard, as windows always uses generics in setup for greater compatibility with more makes and models...If you need more assistance, you may email me at    t.welch2112@yahoo.com

    because I have barely touched the tip of the iceberg on what can be done to get the most from your machine for no cost to you...all of these things you can do, and more.

    http://support.microsoft.com/fixit/


    "http://support.microsoft.com/fixit/default.aspx/". This is MICROSOFT'S new, FREE, fully automated, anonymous support portal, which can help users resolve windows and other product issues with a few mouse clicks. BOOKMARK THIS SITE, EVERYBODY !!!
    Friday, September 30, 2011 6:07 AM
  • Try a clean boot.
    With Best Regards, Boovendan M
    Friday, September 30, 2011 6:37 AM
  • Thanks for the detailed response.  I admit I did not check the degree of fragmentation on the hard drive, but because this is pretty much a new laptop out of the box, I would not expect this to be the situation. 

    I ran Chkdsk with a full surface scan and nothing bad was found. 

    I have  6 GB or ram.

    The drive has over 500 GB of available space.

    I have had to force close Windows because nothing would respond.  Is there a better way than the one I used which is to hold down the power button?

    Eventually I did a system recovery and it now seems to run fine.  At this point I have upgraded to Win 7 Pro, but have not installed Virtual PC or the XP system. 

    One thing I believe I didn't mention is that I was running Firefox as my browser when I had these problems.  I do not know if that contributed anything to the problem, but at this point, I have not re-installed firefox. 

    Again, thank you for the extensive answer and I will continue to install missing pieces until I am at the point I need to be.

    Greg

    Sunday, October 2, 2011 8:01 PM
  • You mentioned you installed virtual pc and xp mode when the problem occurred?.
    The answers/solutions that I provide are from personal experience. They are as is and come with no warranty.
    Monday, October 3, 2011 9:46 AM