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How do I find the DNS address of my server? RRS feed

  • Question

  • A company has set my server to do active directory, dns, and dhcp.  When I do an ipconfig on a workstation, it shows the ip address for the dns server as my router.  What I would like to do is try and manually setup the workstation dns address to point to my server.  Should the dns address for my server be just the static ip of the server?
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 4:15 PM

Answers

  • Yes you are right the static ip of your active directory service is your dns server.The reason you are getting a different dns address is because your dhcp server service is confifured with the dns as your routers address, if you want to change it you should either change it in the server or else point it manually.

    http://www.mediacollege.com/computer/network/dns.html


    http://www.virmansec.com/blogs/skhairuddin
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Ren Tuesday, November 1, 2011 5:10 AM
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 4:27 PM
  • Hello,

    your DNS server should use a static IP address.

    If your computer need access to your domain and to internet resources (You have to configure your ISP DNS server as forwarder on your DNS server) then make it point to your internal DNS server as primary DNS server.

    To do that, you can proceed by two ways:

    • Do that manually
    • Do that using a DHCP server (Make sure that the right DNS server is configured in its options)

     


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.

    Microsoft Student Partner 2010 / 2011
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator: Security
    Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer: Security
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 Active Directory, Configuration
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 Network Infrastructure, Configuration
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure, Configuration
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows 7, Configuring
    Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Enterprise Administrator
    Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Server Administrator
    Microsoft Certified Trainer

    • Marked as answer by Jeff Ren Tuesday, November 1, 2011 5:10 AM
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 9:02 PM

All replies

  • Yes you are right the static ip of your active directory service is your dns server.The reason you are getting a different dns address is because your dhcp server service is confifured with the dns as your routers address, if you want to change it you should either change it in the server or else point it manually.

    http://www.mediacollege.com/computer/network/dns.html


    http://www.virmansec.com/blogs/skhairuddin
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Ren Tuesday, November 1, 2011 5:10 AM
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 4:27 PM
  • from your dhcp server you can set the dns server address.normally your domain controller will be your dns server.from that dns server.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc787034(WS.10).aspx


    Darshana Jayathilake
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 4:29 PM
  • Hello,

    your DNS server should use a static IP address.

    If your computer need access to your domain and to internet resources (You have to configure your ISP DNS server as forwarder on your DNS server) then make it point to your internal DNS server as primary DNS server.

    To do that, you can proceed by two ways:

    • Do that manually
    • Do that using a DHCP server (Make sure that the right DNS server is configured in its options)

     


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.

    Microsoft Student Partner 2010 / 2011
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator: Security
    Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer: Security
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 Active Directory, Configuration
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 Network Infrastructure, Configuration
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure, Configuration
    Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows 7, Configuring
    Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Enterprise Administrator
    Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Server Administrator
    Microsoft Certified Trainer

    • Marked as answer by Jeff Ren Tuesday, November 1, 2011 5:10 AM
    Sunday, October 30, 2011 9:02 PM
  • Hello,

    The way it is configured may cause internal problems, slow clients logging in, internal hosts not resolved, etc. Most routers will proxy DNS, they do not resolve. So more than likely the router has the ISP's public DNS servers in the WAN settings and DHCP is set up to give the router's IP as the DNS server. The actual DNS server, as some of the forum replies state, should be the servers local IP address.

    Go to the DHCP server (if it's the server it's option 6) and set it up so that the DNS option is the server's local IP address.

    If the DHCP is your router, go to DCHP and set up the DNS server the same. If you cannot do this, then go to the WAN properties of the router and change the DNS servers to the local IP address of the server. This way your router can still proxy on behalf of your local server's DNS.

    Make sure you have public forwarders or root servers set in the server's DNS, otherwise you will not resolve outside your configured zones.


    Miguel Fra / Falcon IT Services
    Computer & Network Support, Miami, FL
    Visit our Knowledgebase and Support Sharepoint Site


    • Edited by Miguel Fra Monday, October 31, 2011 12:36 AM
    Monday, October 31, 2011 12:31 AM