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How to configure DNS server to route a domain name to an ip address RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Pros,

    I am new to windows server configuration and all that takes me here was an issue:

    • I've registered a domain www.example.com
    • I own a windows 2k8 server (dedicated)
    • I map my valid IP (got from my ISP) to my server using DMZ server.
    • I have a site on server's localhost
    • when I type the valid IP address in browser, it takes me to my site.
    • AND NOW, I need to install and config DNS server to set my registered domain mapped to localhost in windows server 2k8

    Please guide me to do that easiest way.

    Thank you all in advance.



    • Edited by Vaheed Tuesday, November 1, 2011 7:21 PM
    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 9:10 AM

Answers

  • First, the Registrar requires you to have two DNS servers, one for NS1.example.com, and one for NS2.example.com.

    Second, to port remap/translate UDP 53 and TCP 53, as Tiger indicated, you will need two WAN IP addresses from your ISP.

    Third, these two DNS servers cannot be hosting your Active Directory infrastructures or cannot contain private internal IP addresses.

    Fourth, you will need to make sure that your two DNS servers are up and running 24/7 with 99.9999% uptime, otherwise if they go down, your public resources will not be available

    Fifth, you need a business class ISP line. A residential line won't work.

     

    FYI, It's usually much easier to just allow your registrar to host your public DNS requirements. The registrar has numerous DNS servers and offer 99.9999% uptime. I can see if you are hosting multiple zones, such as 20 or more, and purchase the equipment and additional ISP services to support it, but if you are just doing this for one public domain name, it's really not worth the time and money to do this.

    I used to run two public DNS servers at my home office years ago handling over 50 domain names, but to save electricity, ISP line costs ( had a T1 line about 10 years ago), backup solutions, etc, it was much easier I've found to simply allow my registrar to host all the zone. I retired my two DNS servers, sold them, reduced my ISP line requirements, and saved about $700/mo between ISP and electrical costs.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Edited by Ace Fekay [MCT] Thursday, November 3, 2011 11:29 PM - spelling
    • Proposed as answer by Tiger LiMicrosoft employee Friday, November 4, 2011 3:16 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:48 PM
    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:48 PM
    Thursday, November 3, 2011 3:05 PM
  • Vaheeds,

    As JM said, I thought I was pretty clear.

    However, if I understand your latest question, if you leave DNS at your registrar, but you want to host your own webserver on your machine at home, (this is assuming that your hosting provider allows you to modify DNS records), your hosting provider probably has some sort of "Control Panel" or "CPanel" (as some of them call it) that you would use. There is more than likely some sort of "Advanced DNS control panel" that you would use. When you find it, you can create a www record and a blank record (some control panels show it as "@") and enter the your ADSL WAN IP. In your router at home, you port remap (port translate) TCP 80 to the web server's internal, private IP address.

    Every hosting provider is different and unique, so none of us can provide more specific instructions. Further instructions on how to access the "Advanced DNS control panel" can be found with your hosting provider's help menu or contacting their support department for specific instructions.

    However, keep in mind, ADSL lines are usually "residential" lines and the ISP may not allow inbound services, such as web, mail, etc. You'll have to confer with your ISP if this is allowed with your ISP service.

    I hope I understood the question. If not, please be more specific.

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:04 PM
  • if you registered example.com, you would need to either specify something like ns1.example.com --> your DNS1's IP, and ns2.example.com --> your DNS2's IP.   Some registrars will allow you to specify the same IP for both hosts, but that isn't recommended since you would not have redundancy in your internet name resolution strategy.  Once you create your zone on your DNS server, you would have to create A records for ns1 and ns2 as well.

    Otherwise, if you have other NS records established (in another domain), you would specify them instead of ns records in your domain.

     


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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:37 PM
  • In addition to JM's suggestions, if you can't find where to create the www and @ records in the registrar's Control Panel (they all provide this ability), as I previously suggested, refer to their help files, or if it doesn't say how to, I would contact them for specific assistance.

    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
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    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:49 PM
  • To properly do it, the SOA and NS records of the zone must be an FQDN, such as ns1.YourDomain.com, and NOT just win-s1dtjv69lgg.

    It's showing this way because you've never set a Primary DNS Suffix on the machine (computer properties, Change name, advanced, add Primary DNS Suffix).

    This is because if you will be making your DNS server public, that will shows up as the SOA and NS record for example.com, and the single name will be improper.

    And actually, the registrar requires two NS servers with different IPs. I'm not sure if you will get away with making both the same IP.

    Did you check with your ISP to see if your ADSL line allows inbound services, such as for web, mail, nameserver hosting, etc?

     

     

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 3:24 PM
  • It appears this model supports multiple WAN IPs. You still have to change the service to get the multiple IPs from your ISP. Here are some links I found searching your model - they have screenshots, too.

    http://screenshots.portforward.com/SMC/SMC7904WBRA-N/Address_Mapping.htm
    http://screenshots.portforward.com/SMC/SMC7904WBRA-N/Virtual_Server.htm
    http://screenshots.portforward.com/SMC/SMC7904WBRA-N/NAT_Settings.htm

    And here's the Users's Guide for your model. It has specific step by steps:
    http://www.smc.com/files/AH/MN_SMC7904WBRA-N.pdf

     

    Let us know if you have any more questions regarding the Windows end of it. For specific questions regarding your modem/firewall, if the links above don't help, I would suggest to contact SMC Support:
    http://www.smc.com/index.cfm?event=support&localeCode=EN_BEL

     

     

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Tuesday, May 1, 2012 2:35 PM
    Saturday, November 5, 2011 4:25 PM
  • Good job Vaheed.  As you see, managing DNS services from the registrar's systems is not only easy, but very cost effective.  Unless you have a business reason to run DNS yourself, it generally doesnt make sense these days for most scenarios.

    With regard to your question about hosting additional webs.  You have several options.

    If you wanted to run another website on the same web server, the most common approach is to just use HOST HEADERS.  This way, you can share the same IP and port numbers.  Alternatively, you could run the additional webs on different port numbers, but your users would need to be aware of the port.  From a technical perspective, on the DNS records, you would point them to the same public IP.  DNS is not aware of the port, its just for name resolution.  On your router, you would indeed create a mapping so that your router exposes the private resource to the public.  You would follow the same steps you did to expose port 80.  In this case, you would just specify the new port.

    While you can get some help on web (IIS) on this forum, the best place for IIS assistance is on the MS official forum: http://forums.IIS.net

     

     


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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Wednesday, November 9, 2011 1:51 PM
    Sunday, November 6, 2011 4:16 PM
  • I concur with JM! Good job, Vaheed!

    In addition, you can create additional A records for the same IP and use host headers on your webserver so you don't have to mess with port numbers. For example:

    domain1.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain1.com    89.165.122.216

    domain2.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain2.com    89.165.122.216

    domain3.com             89.165.122.216
    www.comain3.com    89.165.122.216

    etc...

     

    Then in your webserver, for each website you create, you create a hostheader for that specific website. For example:

    The hostheaders for www.domain1.com's website would be:

    And the hostheaders for www.domain2.com would be:

    etc...

     

    If you are using IIS, it would be in the properties for each website you create. If using a third party webserver, you would have to confer with the third party's webserver docs to find out how to enter them.

    Configure a Host Header for a Web Site (IIS 7)
    (Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vist.)
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753195(v=ws.10).aspx

    IIS7 Hostheaders - (with screenshots)
    (Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vist)
    THis also shows how to setup SSL certificates, but the main topic is how to set hostheaders in IIS7.
    http://www.digicert.com/ssl-support/ssl-host-headers-iis-7.htm

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Wednesday, November 9, 2011 1:51 PM
    Sunday, November 6, 2011 5:00 PM

All replies

  • I map my valid IP (got from my ISP) to my server using DMZ server.

    You have to forward needed traffic to your server. You can use TMG Forefront to do that or configure your router to do it.

    AND NOW, I need to install and config DNS server to set my registered domain mapped to localhost in windows server 2k8

    For public access, contact your ISP for assistance.

    For local access, create a DNS zone (let's call it domain.com) and create an A record named www with the wanted IP address. Once done, let your client computer use it for DNS resolution.

     


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.

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    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 10:05 PM
  • Are your DNS servers valid hostname servers registered with the registrar and registered under your public domain name?

    If not, it wil not work on the internet. If you want to make your own DNS server a registered hostname on the internet in order to make this work, it would be best to contact your ISP or your domain registrar that you registered your domain name at for specific instructions on how to do that. Keep in mind, the registrar requires a minimum of two hostname servers to be authorative for a publicly registered domain name.

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 12:30 AM
  • Hi,

     

    Thanks for posting here.

     

    Do you have NAT/Firewall or other internet gateway devices in your network coz you mentioned about DMZ ?

    Like what mentioned by Mr X and Ace , we need modify the SOA record of this internet domain to point to the internet address that you acquired form ISP and holding by you internet gateway device . After that we need set port forwarder to publish your internal DNS sever that hosting your own domain in order to response the incoming querying requests of this domain.

    DNS Server

    The DNS Server service enables DNS name resolution by answering queries and update requests for DNS names. DNS servers are required to locate devices and services that are identified by using DNS names and to locate domain controllers in Active Directory.

    System service name: DNS

    Application protocol

    Protocol

    Ports

    DNS

    UDP

    53

    DNS

    TCP

    53

     

     

    Creating an Internet DNS Domain Name

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc787342(WS.10).aspx

     

    The Structure of a DNS SOA Record

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/163971/en-us

     

    Configuring Access to Services Behind a Network Address Translator (NAT)

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb878046.aspx

     

    Thanks.

     

    Tiger Li


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 9:41 AM
  • Thank you all for your good comments,

    I install DNS on windows server 2k8 and I need to know how to configure DNS to something like:

    • ns1.mydomain.com
    • ns2.mydomain.com

    I registered a domain "example.com" and I have access to a panel that I can set NS1 and NS2 .

    I want to config my server DNS to have these NS1 and NS2, so I can set example.com to my valid IP.

    So, although I know that I am very newbie but I appreciate your kind helps.

    thank you.

     

     

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 6:40 PM
  • First, the Registrar requires you to have two DNS servers, one for NS1.example.com, and one for NS2.example.com.

    Second, to port remap/translate UDP 53 and TCP 53, as Tiger indicated, you will need two WAN IP addresses from your ISP.

    Third, these two DNS servers cannot be hosting your Active Directory infrastructures or cannot contain private internal IP addresses.

    Fourth, you will need to make sure that your two DNS servers are up and running 24/7 with 99.9999% uptime, otherwise if they go down, your public resources will not be available

    Fifth, you need a business class ISP line. A residential line won't work.

     

    FYI, It's usually much easier to just allow your registrar to host your public DNS requirements. The registrar has numerous DNS servers and offer 99.9999% uptime. I can see if you are hosting multiple zones, such as 20 or more, and purchase the equipment and additional ISP services to support it, but if you are just doing this for one public domain name, it's really not worth the time and money to do this.

    I used to run two public DNS servers at my home office years ago handling over 50 domain names, but to save electricity, ISP line costs ( had a T1 line about 10 years ago), backup solutions, etc, it was much easier I've found to simply allow my registrar to host all the zone. I retired my two DNS servers, sold them, reduced my ISP line requirements, and saved about $700/mo between ISP and electrical costs.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Edited by Ace Fekay [MCT] Thursday, November 3, 2011 11:29 PM - spelling
    • Proposed as answer by Tiger LiMicrosoft employee Friday, November 4, 2011 3:16 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:48 PM
    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:48 PM
    Thursday, November 3, 2011 3:05 PM
  • what are you trying to host or publish your DNS, do you have only one DNS and if not then consider publishing more than once DNS becuase it is one of the most critical thing.

    Well DNS can resolve your internal address if you cofigure your DMZ or have Cisco guy (in case if you cisco asa) do it by implementing an ACL.


    Where Technology Meets Talent
    Thursday, November 3, 2011 9:44 PM
  • I agree with Ace...unless you are not concerned with costs associated with running the DNS servers (hardware, LICENSING, maintenance, internet bandwidth, it really is more cost effective to host your DNS zones with your registrar.  As a matter of fact, most of them include that in the cost of registering the domain name, so there is no additional out of pocket expense.  They will provide you with a highly available, fault tolerant DNS solution.

    Just my opinion from personal experience as well.


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    Friday, November 4, 2011 12:18 AM
  • For me there is no difference between hosting DNS zones with my registrar or my own server. I just want to reach my goal, the goal is:

    I want to host my website myself (in my dedicated server). I have one valid IP address that point to my windows server 2008 using DMZ settings in my adsl modem router.

    I register a domain name, and I am not gonna host my website by web hosting providers.

    HOW CAN I MAKE MY REGISTERED EXAMPLE.COM DOMAIN, POINT TO MY OWN WEBSERVER?

    Thank you all for your patience.

     

     

    Friday, November 4, 2011 10:05 AM
  • vaheeds, Ace already provided you with that information in his last response.  Is there something that you did not understand and require more clarification?


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    Friday, November 4, 2011 12:12 PM
  • Vaheeds,

    As JM said, I thought I was pretty clear.

    However, if I understand your latest question, if you leave DNS at your registrar, but you want to host your own webserver on your machine at home, (this is assuming that your hosting provider allows you to modify DNS records), your hosting provider probably has some sort of "Control Panel" or "CPanel" (as some of them call it) that you would use. There is more than likely some sort of "Advanced DNS control panel" that you would use. When you find it, you can create a www record and a blank record (some control panels show it as "@") and enter the your ADSL WAN IP. In your router at home, you port remap (port translate) TCP 80 to the web server's internal, private IP address.

    Every hosting provider is different and unique, so none of us can provide more specific instructions. Further instructions on how to access the "Advanced DNS control panel" can be found with your hosting provider's help menu or contacting their support department for specific instructions.

    However, keep in mind, ADSL lines are usually "residential" lines and the ISP may not allow inbound services, such as web, mail, etc. You'll have to confer with your ISP if this is allowed with your ISP service.

    I hope I understood the question. If not, please be more specific.

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
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    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:04 PM
  • Hi Ace,

    I pay for register example.com with a domain registrar company (just domain name, not host). the registrar company only provide me a panel that let's me change DNS of domain by inputting DNS1:--- and DNS2:---. I CAN'T ADD ANY RESOURCE RECORD OR SOMETHING. what should I do now? should I register a domain with another company? or install DNS server on my own web server?

    Thank you.

    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:30 PM
  • if you registered example.com, you would need to either specify something like ns1.example.com --> your DNS1's IP, and ns2.example.com --> your DNS2's IP.   Some registrars will allow you to specify the same IP for both hosts, but that isn't recommended since you would not have redundancy in your internet name resolution strategy.  Once you create your zone on your DNS server, you would have to create A records for ns1 and ns2 as well.

    Otherwise, if you have other NS records established (in another domain), you would specify them instead of ns records in your domain.

     


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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:37 PM
  • In addition to JM's suggestions, if you can't find where to create the www and @ records in the registrar's Control Panel (they all provide this ability), as I previously suggested, refer to their help files, or if it doesn't say how to, I would contact them for specific assistance.

    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:49 PM
  • As  JM mentioned I installed DNS server on my machine, and create a NEW ZONE with name 'example.com'.

    then I add two A record, NS1.example.com with x.x.x.x(static ip) and NS2.example.com x.x.x.x(same static ip).

    was that correct?

    Friday, November 4, 2011 3:06 PM
  • Friday, November 4, 2011 3:14 PM
  • To properly do it, the SOA and NS records of the zone must be an FQDN, such as ns1.YourDomain.com, and NOT just win-s1dtjv69lgg.

    It's showing this way because you've never set a Primary DNS Suffix on the machine (computer properties, Change name, advanced, add Primary DNS Suffix).

    This is because if you will be making your DNS server public, that will shows up as the SOA and NS record for example.com, and the single name will be improper.

    And actually, the registrar requires two NS servers with different IPs. I'm not sure if you will get away with making both the same IP.

    Did you check with your ISP to see if your ADSL line allows inbound services, such as for web, mail, nameserver hosting, etc?

     

     

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Friday, November 4, 2011 3:47 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 3:24 PM
  • I think I have to get another static Ip for second dns server, should I have another physical server for second dns server?

    and thank you guys for your good helps. 

    Friday, November 4, 2011 3:40 PM
  • That's what they require - 2 DNS servers, but I think you may be able to get away with it with two WAN IPs translated to the one DNS server. Give it a a try. I've heard others that have done it that way.

    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Friday, November 4, 2011 3:53 PM
  • thank you Ace , you help me alot . now I am not confuse any more.

    Are you available for further advises by email, forum or another ways? it's OK if you don't.

    any way, I thank you all guys very much.

    Friday, November 4, 2011 4:07 PM
  • Ace, just to add about the two IPs, I faintly recall years ago assisting a client that did not want to obtain a second IP and they just created two records pointing to the same IP (don't recall who the registrar was).  Again I am not sure that all registrars allow this (since I normally wouldn't implement this single IP solution), nor would I or any DNS administrator suggest that this is the proper way to proceed.

    However, if vaheeds has to pay for an additional public IP just to NAT it back to the same host, I would recommend that he first check with the registrar to see if they accept two host names back to one IP.

     

     


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    Friday, November 4, 2011 6:32 PM
  • JM, you are right. I start a thread in my registrar support site to know about these ambiguities. and when I make sure about that I try this again.

    Thank you anyway.

    Friday, November 4, 2011 7:43 PM
  • One more thing about the additional IP, if you get an additional one, you may need to upgrade your router to a router that supports multiple WAN IPs. Not all routers do.

    The ISP may upgrade the ADSL modem to support this, too. But from what I recall, all the ADSL lines I've ever dealt with are DHCP WAN IPs (not static) and usually residential lines.

    Maybe Vaheed, you are in a location that does offer business static ADSL lines, but I am not sure.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Friday, November 4, 2011 10:10 PM
  • I have a SMC7904WBRA-N adsl modem router that has many capabilities such as Demilitarized Zone that I can map public ip addresses to client ip address in my LAN. so I think there is no concern about requirements. 

    • Edited by Vaheed Saturday, November 5, 2011 6:24 AM
    Saturday, November 5, 2011 5:43 AM
  • It appears this model supports multiple WAN IPs. You still have to change the service to get the multiple IPs from your ISP. Here are some links I found searching your model - they have screenshots, too.

    http://screenshots.portforward.com/SMC/SMC7904WBRA-N/Address_Mapping.htm
    http://screenshots.portforward.com/SMC/SMC7904WBRA-N/Virtual_Server.htm
    http://screenshots.portforward.com/SMC/SMC7904WBRA-N/NAT_Settings.htm

    And here's the Users's Guide for your model. It has specific step by steps:
    http://www.smc.com/files/AH/MN_SMC7904WBRA-N.pdf

     

    Let us know if you have any more questions regarding the Windows end of it. For specific questions regarding your modem/firewall, if the links above don't help, I would suggest to contact SMC Support:
    http://www.smc.com/index.cfm?event=support&localeCode=EN_BEL

     

     

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Tuesday, May 1, 2012 2:35 PM
    Saturday, November 5, 2011 4:25 PM
  • Hi Ace,

    I can't say how helpful you were to me! with your advises I could get the job done finally!

    I thought that I have to run a DNS server myself, If I want to map my domain name to the public IP of my office web server, because the control panel that my registrar brought to me was very simple and I just was able to change the ns1 and ns2 of my domain.

    After getting experienced in this thread, I realized that I can take control of my domain myself! So I sent the request to my registrar via support panel and they give me the full control panel of domain name(and all responsibilities of crashing stuff etc.).

    Then I went to domain management console> DNS Management and add two A record to it

    • www.example.com ------> xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
    • example.com ------> xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx

    like this:

    And this is it!, after 24 hours the web address is working great and is pointing to my web server default website.

    So what if I want to have another site on same web server, but on another port (for example port 51234 instead of 80).I mean something like example.com:51234. I think I have to get another static IP from my ISP. am I right?

    any way, Thank you all who help me get this done!


    • Edited by Vaheed Sunday, November 6, 2011 11:19 AM
    Sunday, November 6, 2011 11:15 AM
  • Good job Vaheed.  As you see, managing DNS services from the registrar's systems is not only easy, but very cost effective.  Unless you have a business reason to run DNS yourself, it generally doesnt make sense these days for most scenarios.

    With regard to your question about hosting additional webs.  You have several options.

    If you wanted to run another website on the same web server, the most common approach is to just use HOST HEADERS.  This way, you can share the same IP and port numbers.  Alternatively, you could run the additional webs on different port numbers, but your users would need to be aware of the port.  From a technical perspective, on the DNS records, you would point them to the same public IP.  DNS is not aware of the port, its just for name resolution.  On your router, you would indeed create a mapping so that your router exposes the private resource to the public.  You would follow the same steps you did to expose port 80.  In this case, you would just specify the new port.

    While you can get some help on web (IIS) on this forum, the best place for IIS assistance is on the MS official forum: http://forums.IIS.net

     

     


    Guides and tutorials, visit ITGeared.com.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Wednesday, November 9, 2011 1:51 PM
    Sunday, November 6, 2011 4:16 PM
  • I concur with JM! Good job, Vaheed!

    In addition, you can create additional A records for the same IP and use host headers on your webserver so you don't have to mess with port numbers. For example:

    domain1.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain1.com    89.165.122.216

    domain2.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain2.com    89.165.122.216

    domain3.com             89.165.122.216
    www.comain3.com    89.165.122.216

    etc...

     

    Then in your webserver, for each website you create, you create a hostheader for that specific website. For example:

    The hostheaders for www.domain1.com's website would be:

    And the hostheaders for www.domain2.com would be:

    etc...

     

    If you are using IIS, it would be in the properties for each website you create. If using a third party webserver, you would have to confer with the third party's webserver docs to find out how to enter them.

    Configure a Host Header for a Web Site (IIS 7)
    (Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vist.)
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753195(v=ws.10).aspx

    IIS7 Hostheaders - (with screenshots)
    (Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vist)
    THis also shows how to setup SSL certificates, but the main topic is how to set hostheaders in IIS7.
    http://www.digicert.com/ssl-support/ssl-host-headers-iis-7.htm

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    • Marked as answer by Vaheed Wednesday, November 9, 2011 1:51 PM
    Sunday, November 6, 2011 5:00 PM
  • hello how you guys doing, man this thread helped me alot....this is the same question im pondering for days......thanx alot for everybody...

    Friday, November 18, 2011 7:24 AM
  • oh wait i got dought.....this thread is about creating nameservers ns1 and ns2 using single static ip, but ur showing A records created to point towards 89.165.122.216.......how s this possible......how this A records can act as nameservers ?
    Friday, November 18, 2011 7:37 AM
  • In addition, you can create additional A records for the same IP and use host headers on your webserver so you don't have to mess with port numbers. For example:

    domain1.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain1.com    89.165.122.216

    domain2.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain2.com    89.165.122.216

    domain3.com             89.165.122.216
    www.comain3.com    89.165.122.216

    etc...

     

    Then in your webserver, for each website you create, you create a hostheader for that specific website. For example:

    The hostheaders for www.domain1.com's website would be:

    And the hostheaders for www.domain2.com would be:

    etc...

    Hi Ace,

    I take your advice for hosting multiple domain names on one web server, and it works great for me!

    Tuesday, May 1, 2012 2:44 PM
  • oh wait i got dought.....this thread is about creating nameservers ns1 and ns2 using single static ip, but ur showing A records created to point towards 89.165.122.216.......how s this possible......how this A records can act as nameservers ?

    Vaka.ca,

    They are not "nameserver" records, rather they are "A" (host) records. A nameserver record is the DNS server that hosts the zone name.

    The "www" "A" records for that IP (89.165.122.216) were for Vaheed. The IPs would be different for your own webserver.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 EA, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This post is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Tuesday, May 1, 2012 3:10 PM
  • In addition, you can create additional A records for the same IP and use host headers on your webserver so you don't have to mess with port numbers. For example:

    domain1.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain1.com    89.165.122.216

    domain2.com             89.165.122.216
    www.domain2.com    89.165.122.216

    domain3.com             89.165.122.216
    www.comain3.com    89.165.122.216

    etc...

    Then in your webserver, for each website you create, you create a hostheader for that specific website. For example:

    The hostheaders for www.domain1.com's website would be:

    And the hostheaders for www.domain2.com would be:

    etc...

    Hi Ace,

    I take your advice for hosting multiple domain names on one web server, and it works great for me!

    I'm happy to hear you found the information helpful!

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 EA, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This post is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn

    Tuesday, May 1, 2012 3:10 PM
  • oh wait i got dought.....this thread is about creating nameservers ns1 and ns2 using single static ip, but ur showing A records created to point towards 89.165.122.216.......how s this possible......how this A records can act as nameservers ?

    Vaka, if you are having problems configuring something, I would suggest to start a new thread and provide details about your own environment, setup, IPs, etc, and what you're trying to achieve, and we will be more than happy to assist you.

    .


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 EA, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This post is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn

    Tuesday, May 1, 2012 3:11 PM