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"Complete and unrestricted access" To windows 10 apparently means restricted from deleting junk files? RRS feed

  • Question

  • So to keep things brief, I'm an administrator, which as User Accounts explicitly states means that I have complete and unrestricted access to the computer/domain, and that I can make any desired changes.

    That being said, I'm still denied permission when I try to delete files, and told that I need administrator permission (I'm the only administrator, and I definitely do have my own permission)

    Who's funny joke was this and how do I give a user (myself) permission to actually change files? Please note that I'm not asking how to change the owner of a given file so that it can be accessed around this terrible terrible idea of "security". I'm specifically asking how to give myself, as admin, permission to just erase or move a file when needed, without having to go into the properties of each individual file and declare myself the owner, which is an absurd thing to ever have to do as administrator.

    Wednesday, September 4, 2019 3:06 AM

All replies

  • This forum is for *Intune* related questions so you should post in an appropriate forum.

    However, just because you are a local admin, doesn't mean you automatically have permissions to everything and it also doesn't mean that something isn't locking the file. The later is the most likely case as sometimes processes lock a file and then never release the lock for various reasons (none of which are normal).

    If it is a permissions issue, then you must first take ownership of the file to be able to grant permissions though as you cannot just change the permissions on a file that you are not the owner of.

    having to go into the properties of each individual file and declare myself the owner, which is an absurd thing to ever have to do as administrator.

    It's not absurd at all. It's explicitly how permissions in Windows was designed from the beginning for many reasons. As noted, being an administrator means that you can administer the system, it doesn't mean that you should automatically have permissions to everything by default. 


    Jason | https://home.configmgrftw.com | @jasonsandys

    Wednesday, September 4, 2019 12:20 PM