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Error: The volume cannot be extended (16TB Volume) RRS feed

  • Question

  • I get the error, "VdsError: The volume cannot be extended because the number of clusters will exceed the maximum number of clusters supported by the file system".

    I read a number of links in this forum and other Microsoft forums that seems to indicate that there is a 16 TB limit to the size of the Recovery Point (RP) volume when the cluster size of the volume is set to 4 KB.

    My question is this, can I extend the RP volume on my server that currently has 16 TB allocated with a cluster byte size of 64 KB?

    Here are some other details for my DPM server: Storage Pool total capacity = 83 TB; Unallocated space = 45 TB; DPM 2012 SP1; Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise SP1

    - Jenna

    Thursday, December 5, 2013 3:03 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi

    DPM always formats it's volumes using 4K cluster size, so unless you reformatted it using 64k clusters before DPM started using it, then you will not be able to extent it beyond the 16TB limit

    You can get the current NTFS cluster size using the following command where the volume GUID is that of the recovery point volume in question.

    C:\>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo \\?\Volume{6ad7aed9-9eb3-11e1-a426-806e6f6e6963}\
    NTFS Volume Serial Number :       0x3a76e34776e3030d
    NTFS Version   :                  3.1
    LFS Version    :                  2.0
    Number Sectors :                  0x000000001e9d2fff
    Total Clusters :                  0x0000000003d3a5ff
    Free Clusters  :                  0x0000000001baeacb
    Total Reserved :                  0x0000000000002cc0
    Bytes Per Sector  :               512
    Bytes Per Physical Sector :    512
    Bytes Per Cluster :               4096
    Bytes Per FileRecord Segment    : 1024
    Clusters Per FileRecord Segment : 0
    Mft Valid Data Length :           0x0000000018040000
    Mft Start Lcn  :                  0x00000000000c0000
    Mft2 Start Lcn :                  0x0000000000000002
    Mft Zone Start :                  0x0000000000c89140
    Mft Zone End   :                  0x0000000000c8f5e0
    Resource Manager Identifier :     8BD42C5E-9EB6-11E1-8A35-009C021DF7E4


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.



    Thursday, December 5, 2013 5:43 PM
    Moderator
  • When I run the fsutil command I get the following:

    C:\Windows\system32>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo f:
    NTFS Volume Serial Number :       0x36ae0e8eae0e4739
    Version :                         3.1
    Number Sectors :                  0x00000000111647ff
    Total Clusters :                  0x0000000000222c8f
    Free Clusters  :                  0x000000000021ee98
    Total Reserved :                  0x0000000000000000
    Bytes Per Sector  :               512
    Bytes Per Physical Sector :       <Not Supported>
    Bytes Per Cluster :               65536
    Bytes Per FileRecord Segment    : 1024
    Clusters Per FileRecord Segment : 0
    Mft Valid Data Length :           0x0000000000040000
    Mft Start Lcn  :                  0x000000000000c000
    Mft2 Start Lcn :                  0x0000000000000001
    Mft Zone Start :                  0x000000000000c000
    Mft Zone End   :                  0x000000000000cca0
    RM Identifier:        BA155124-2B17-11E3-8670-D89D6728E690

    Thursday, December 5, 2013 8:12 PM
  • Hi,

    What does the 16TB volume show for cluster size ?

    This volume shows total clusters = 0x222c8f = 2239631 * 65536 = 146776457216 bytes

    That volume is only 146776457216/1024/1024/1024=136GB in size.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Thursday, December 5, 2013 8:44 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for your further question.  It shows the following.  I performed the fsutil on the wrong volume above.

    C:\Windows\system32>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo \\?\Volume{e46fcf19-3316-11e3-ab3f-441ea1031026}\
    NTFS Volume Serial Number :       0xfafc48d2fc488b39
    Version :                         3.1
    Number Sectors :                  0x00000007cfffffff
    Total Clusters :                  0x00000000f9ffffff
    Free Clusters  :                  0x000000004cdeba3c
    Total Reserved :                  0x0000000000000000
    Bytes Per Sector  :               512
    Bytes Per Cluster :               4096
    Bytes Per FileRecord Segment    : 1024
    Clusters Per FileRecord Segment : 0
    Mft Valid Data Length :           0x00000000009c0000
    Mft Start Lcn  :                  0x00000000000c0000
    Mft2 Start Lcn :                  0x0000000000000002
    Mft Zone Start :                  0x00000000ad5bdc00
    Mft Zone End   :                  0x00000000ad5ca2e0
    RM Identifier:        E46FCF1D-3316-11E3-AB3F-441EA1031026

    Thus, is the maximum replica and recovery volume set at 16TB for DPM 2012 SP1 when the cluster size is 4096?

    Thursday, December 5, 2013 9:56 PM
  • HI,

    Yes, see the following post for ways to move forward.

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/4d17f1ca-75e7-4329-9939-5806ad04a2d8/modifying-disk-allocation-for-e-failed

    look at the bottom of the post under the section:

    Long Term Solution
    =============


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    • Marked as answer by Jenna Katie Friday, December 6, 2013 2:57 PM
    Friday, December 6, 2013 12:30 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you very much.
    Friday, December 6, 2013 2:57 PM