locked
need to do file grooming , archiving on user files to free up disk space RRS feed

  • Question

  • users fail to do housekeeping i need a method , and or software to do file grooming so as to identify old files , seldom accessed files etc , in order to free up disk space any suggestions please

    one problem i have is backup exec dates and time stamps users files so it appears that the file may have been accessed or used recently , when in fact it has not 

    Wednesday, October 6, 2010 10:54 AM

Answers

  • What version of OS do you use for the file server? if you have Win 2003 r2 or higer, did you look in to File Server Resource Manager? http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc754810(WS.10).aspx

    What version do you use for Backup Exec? Backup softwares shoult set backup date time stamp (archiving bit) but not anything else

    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Saturday, October 30, 2010 1:53 PM
    Wednesday, October 6, 2010 1:44 PM
  • Hi Barry King,

    What course of action should you take? Let me ask some questions first. How much productivity loss will there be when you ask your users to clean up files and what will there answer be when you ask them to clean up?

    Reactions I always get is I need everything. Let’s say that 100 ppl will spend on average half an hour cleaning up files and or sorting them. How much money is spend doing such an action? I see that investing in storage is most of the time cheaper than cleaning up. What does storage cost now a days? Almost nothing when you compare it to several years back. Look at free services as live from MS. There you get 25GB personal space in skydrive. This is also what users see on the internet. But only get a fraction at their work to store files in and have to clean up. Also what is the ease for end users to have their data on a media like CD/DVD or external drive. I think this only creates more complexity for users and this is something you would like to stay away from.

    My solution would be more on the line of moving/separating data to another storage disk. Make it read only and backup once. Or just leave all the data and buy more storage. Oke you need to spend money but cleaning up cost money to.

    I love to use SharePoint instead of files servers but that might go a little far.

    Hope this helps a bit?

     

    • Proposed as answer by Rick Slager Wednesday, October 13, 2010 6:02 AM
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Saturday, October 30, 2010 1:53 PM
    Thursday, October 7, 2010 11:33 AM

All replies

  • What version of OS do you use for the file server? if you have Win 2003 r2 or higer, did you look in to File Server Resource Manager? http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc754810(WS.10).aspx

    What version do you use for Backup Exec? Backup softwares shoult set backup date time stamp (archiving bit) but not anything else

    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Saturday, October 30, 2010 1:53 PM
    Wednesday, October 6, 2010 1:44 PM
  • Hi Rick

    By coincident i found the fsrm tool on the server late yesterday , it appears to allow me to generate reports on files identifying large files & least accessed files etc , i will try to use this

     

    as regards BACKUP EXEC we are running version 11d

    when i have identified dupilcate files , large files etc across the users folders

    what coarse of action would you take ? , simply ask the users to determine if they still require such files , or just back them up to cd/dvd  for instance then delete them off the server and give them the cd/dvd , or perhaps backup to an enternal disk all the files identified for all the users

    regards

     


    barry king
    Thursday, October 7, 2010 10:00 AM
  • Hi Barry King,

    What course of action should you take? Let me ask some questions first. How much productivity loss will there be when you ask your users to clean up files and what will there answer be when you ask them to clean up?

    Reactions I always get is I need everything. Let’s say that 100 ppl will spend on average half an hour cleaning up files and or sorting them. How much money is spend doing such an action? I see that investing in storage is most of the time cheaper than cleaning up. What does storage cost now a days? Almost nothing when you compare it to several years back. Look at free services as live from MS. There you get 25GB personal space in skydrive. This is also what users see on the internet. But only get a fraction at their work to store files in and have to clean up. Also what is the ease for end users to have their data on a media like CD/DVD or external drive. I think this only creates more complexity for users and this is something you would like to stay away from.

    My solution would be more on the line of moving/separating data to another storage disk. Make it read only and backup once. Or just leave all the data and buy more storage. Oke you need to spend money but cleaning up cost money to.

    I love to use SharePoint instead of files servers but that might go a little far.

    Hope this helps a bit?

     

    • Proposed as answer by Rick Slager Wednesday, October 13, 2010 6:02 AM
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Saturday, October 30, 2010 1:53 PM
    Thursday, October 7, 2010 11:33 AM
  • Another good tool is Treesize.  There is a free version and a professional version.  Just search the net for treesize and you will find it.

    It allows you to drill down on folders sort by size and see what's taking up so much space.  You can export to excel if you need to email department heads etc.  The professional version lets your run it from a script, so you could schedule reports if you wanted.  FSRM is nice too for scheduled reports.

    One cool feature I implemented in File Server Resource Manager is File Screens.  It sends an email alert to our department and the user whenever anyone attempts to save music files to any of shares.  Haven't had problems with MP3's since turning it on.

    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 6:44 PM
  • Hi Barry,

    I agree completely with Rick.  I would stay away from CDs/DVDs for a number of reasons:

    • their life expectancy is only around 8 years where as hard disks much longer
    • they have a tendancy to get lost, mislabeled, etc. - rendering them useless when the user is looking for their files
    • they are not managed by I.T., and thusly make it very easy for people to walk off with only copies of company files

    Although storage space is cheap these days, backup space is costly.  I have recently implemented a small NAS which I have asked users to store large files which they do not need to be backed up.  The NAS is RAID 1, so has some protection, however these files like software installations, drive images, etc. are enormous and do not need to be on the server and backed up daily/weekly/monthly (in my opinion).

    As for removing files; I use a program called WinDirStat (open source) which seems to do the same thing as treeview.  It has a graphical representation of drive space usage, and very quickly allows you to identify the big space hogs/users.  At this point I contact the user and look at deleting old files or moving them to the NAS.  I find that concentrating on the top few users is enough to keep things under control.

    Cheers,

     

     


    ++++ Greg ++++
    Tuesday, October 19, 2010 9:22 PM
  • Hi Rick

    thanks for the info , my IT Manager has agreed , the easiest way for us is too  acquire addtional

    disk space  hard drives

    not done these forum before, how to i terminate the dicussion now i have my anwsers ?


    barry king
    Wednesday, November 3, 2010 3:33 PM